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Full text of "Annual report of the city of Somerville"

CITY OF SOMERVILLE 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



1892 




SOMERVILLE JOURNAL PRINT. 
1893. 



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CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1892. 



MAYOR. 

WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, 
188 Central Street. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Charles B. Osgood, President. 



WARD ONE. 



S. Walker Janes . 
Edric Eldridge 



Frank E. Fitts 
Warren J. Robinson 



Charles B. Osgood 
William L. Barber 



William A. Hunnewell 
Newell F. Caswell 



WARD TWO. 



WARD THREE. 



WARD FOUR. 



142 Washington Street. 
88 Pearl Street. 



17 Pleasant Avenue. 
ll^Greene Street. 



71 Oilman Street. 
36 Marshall Street. 



9 Mason Avenue. 
49 Cherry Street. 



CLERK. 

George I. Vincent. 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

Isaiah H. Wiley, Pi-esident. 



WARD ONE. 



Isaiah H. Wiley . 
Joseph A. Bartlett 
Herbert E. Merrill 
Lewis Stockbridge 



James W. Bean 
Franklin J. Hamblin 
Michael E. Flynn 
Fred W. Gilbert 



Thomas S. Wentworth 
Lewis B. Hollis . 
John Andrews 
Calvin H. Whitney 



Franklin F. Phillips . 
Charles A. G. Winther 
Franklin E. Huntress 
J. WiLLARD Jones . . • 



WARD two. 



ward three 



WARD FOUR. 



54 Mt. Vernon Street. 
64 Cross Street. 
44 Florence Street. 
33 Pinckney Street. 

40 Columbus Avenue. 
30 Walnut Street. 
1 Tremont Place. 
101 School Street. 



350 Broadway. 
476 Broadway. 
34 Albion Street. 
158 Pearl Street. 



211 Holland Street. 
408 Highland Avenue. 
318 Elm Street. 
217 Beacon Street. 



CLERK. 

Charles S. Robertson. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Osgood, Robinson; Councilmen Hamblin, 
Merrill, Jones. 

City Engineering. — Aldermen Barber, Osgood; Councilmen 
Flynn, Jones, Bartlett. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1892. 6 

Claims. — His Honor the Mayor; Alderman Hunnewell; the 
President of the Common Council; Councilmen Hollis, Hamblin. 

Finance. — His Honor the Mayor; Aldermen Fitts, Janes; the 
President of the Common Council ; Councilmen Hamblin, Phillips, 
Wentworth, Stockbridge. 

Fire Department. — Aldermen Fitts, Caswell; Councilmen Bean, 
Bartlett, Andrews. 

Fuel and Street Lights. — Aldermen Robinson, Eldridge ; 
Councilmen Huntress, Whitney, Merrill. 

Highways. — Aldermen Barber, Janes; Councilmen Winther, An- 
drews, Flynn. 

Legislative Matters. — His Honor the Mayor; Alderman Os- 
good; the President of the Common Council; Councilmen Bean, 
Phillips. 

Ordinances. — Aldermen Hunnewell, Osgood; Councilmen Stock- 
bridge, Gilbert, Huntress. 

Printing. — Aldermen Janes, Hunnewell; Councilmen Huntress, 
Whitney, Bean. 

Public Grounds. — Aldermen Eldridge, Fitts; Councilmen Win- 
ther, Hollis, Bartlett. 

Public Property. — Aldermen Hunnewell, Eldridge ; Councilmen 
Wentworth, Phillips, Gilbert. 

Soldiers' Relief. — Aldermen Caswell, Janes ; Councilmen Went- 
worth, Stockbridge, Gilbert. 

Water. — Aldermen Caswell, Osgood; the President of the Com- 
mon Council ; Councilmen Hollis, Hamblin. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Elections. — Aldermen Robinson, Eldridge, Osgood. 

Enrolled Ordinances. — Aldermen Barber, Fitts, Hunnewell. 

Licenses. — Aldermen Eldridge, Barber, Robinson. 

Police. — His Honor the Mayor; Aldermen Fitts, Hunnewell. 

Sewers. — Aldermen Osgood, Robinson, Caswell. 

State Aid. — Aldermen Janes, Robinson, Barber, Caswell. 

Special Building Permits. — Aldermen Barber, Fitts. 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Elections and Returns. — Councilmen Whitney, Winther, Flynn» 
Enrolled Ordinances and Resolutions. — Councilmen Jones^ 
Merrill, Andrews. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

William H. Hodgkins, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 

Isaiah H. Wiley, President of the Common Council, ex officio. 

(Term, three years.) 

WARD ONE. 

S. Newton Cutler (elected 1891). 
Horace C. White, M. D. (elected 1889). 
Sanford Hanscom, M. D. (elected 1890). 

ward two. 

James F. Beard (elected 1889). 
Thomas M. Durell, M. D. (elected 1890). 
Alvah B. Dearborn, M. D. (elected 1891). 

WARD THREE. 

Norman W. Bingham (elected 1891). 

QuiNCY E. DicKERMAN (elected 1889). 

Helen J. Sanborn (elected 1890). 

WARD FOUR. 

Giles W. Bryant, M. D. (elected 1889). 

Martin W. Carr (elected 1890). 

Benjamin G. Brown (elected 1891). 

Clarence E. Meleney, Superintendent a?id Secretary. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1892. 

ASSESSORS. 

(Term, three years.) 

Benjamin F. Thompson (term expires 1893). 
George W. Hadley (term expires 1894). 
Samuel T. Richards (term expires 1895). 



ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

(Term, one year.) 

WARD ONE. 

Joshua H. Davis (resigned May 25). 
Edward G. Wiswell (elected May 27). 

WARD TWO. 

William A. Flaherty, 

WARD three. 
Edgar T. Mayhew. 

ward four. 

Harry A. True. 

Clerk, Albert B. Fales. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Term: Physician, three years; other members, two years.) 

J. Frank Wellington (term expires 1893), Chairman. 

Charles H. Crane (term expires 1894). 

Alvah B. Dearborn, M. D. (term expires 1895). 

Clerk, William P. Mitchell. 

Agent, Caleb A. Page. 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Office, Police Building, Bow Street. 

William ^. Hodgkins, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 

(Term, four years.) 

Charles G. Brett (term expires 1893). 

Edward B. West (term expires 1895). 

James G. Hinckley (term expires 1896). 

Nathan H. Reed (term expires 1894). 

Agent ^ Charles C. Folsom. 

Secretary^ Frank W. Kaan. 



SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD. 

Office, Prospect Street, corner Somerville Avenue. 
( Term, three years.) 

George D. Wemyss (term expires 1894), 

5 Austin Street. 

Albion A. Perry (term expires 1893), 

366 Broadway. 

George A. Kimball (term expires 1895), 

5 Munroe Street. 

Nathaniel Dennett, Siipt. Water Works. 

Frank E. Merrill, Clerk. 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS. 

(Term: City Clerk, one year; other members, three years.) 

Cromwell G. Rowell (term expires 1894), Chairman. 

Charles P. Lincoln (term expires 1895). 

William B. Hawes (term expires 1893). 

George I. Vincent, City Clerk. 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

(Term, three years.) 

Charles S. Lincoln, Chairman (term expires 1894). 
William E. Weld, Secretary (term expires 1893). 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1892. 

James E. Whitaker (term expires 1893). 

John B. Viall (term expires 1893). 

J. Henry Flitner (term expires 1895). 

Christopher E. Rymes (term expires 1894). 

Elijah C. Clark (term expires 1895). 

Charles H. Brown (term expires 1894). 

Charles A. West (term expires 1895). 

Librarian, Harriet A. Adams. 



CITY CLERK AND CLERK OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

George I. Vincent. 



CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

John F. Cole. 



MESSENGER TO CITY COUNCIL. 

Jairus Mann. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Selwyn Z. Bowman. 



CITY AUDITOR. 

Charles S. Robertson. 



CITY ENGINEER. 
Horace L. Eaton. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Thomas H. Fames. 



10 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS AND SUPERINTENDENT OF 
PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LIGHTS. 



Thomas R. Roulstone. 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 
Melville C. Parkhurst. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

James R. Hopkins. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF ELECTRIC LINES. 
James R. Hopkins. . 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Alvah B. Dearborn, M. D. 



INSPECTOR OF MILK AND VINEGAR. 

Thomas Cunningham. 



INSPECTOR OF PROVISIONS AND OF ANIMALS INTENDED 

FOR SLAUGHTER. 

D. Warner Danforth. 



CLERK OF COMMITTEES. 

William P. Mitchell. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1892. 11 



CLERK OF ASSESSORS. 

Albert B. Fales. 



Suitable Person to Cause to be Properly* Interred the Bodies of 

Honorably Discharged Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines, 

Under Chapter 395, Acts of 1889. 

Jesse J. Underhill. 



CONSTABLES. 



Jairus Mann. William D. Hayden. 

Robert R. Perry. Samuel R. Dow. 

Charles C. Folsom. Joseph J. Giles. 

Edward McGarr. George Cullis. 

Christopher C. Cavanagh. Dennis Kelley. 

Eugene A. Carter. Charles L. Ellis. 

Clarence Tucker. 



FIELD DRIVERS. 

Christopher C. Cavanagh. Charles S. Thrasher. 
George H. Carleton. George W. Bean. 

John E. Fuller. Charles L. Ellis. 

Jacob W. Skinner. John G. Knight. 

Theodore E. Heron. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

Lambert M. Maynard. Ammiel Colman. 



POUND KEEPER. 

Charles A. Small. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Ammiel Colman, 34 Marshall Street. 



12 ANNUAL REPORFS. 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK. 

Samuel T. Littlefield. 



MEASURER OF GRAIN. 

John Craig. 



PUBLIC WEIGHER IN CHARGE OF CITY SCALES, UNION 

SQUARE. 

Fulton O'Brion. 



WEIGHERS OF COAL. 

John Craig. D. Warner Danforth. 

George K. Walcott. Thaddeus Harrington. 

Charles H. Tucker. C. C. Wooley. 

G. E. Slack. Edward L. Dunning. 

George E. Newcomb. William I. Newcomb. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY AND STRAW. 

John Craig. Thaddeus Harrington. 

Charles A. Tucker. C. C. Wooley. 

G. E. Slack. Edward L. Dunning. 



WEIGHERS OF BEEF. 

D. Warner Danforth. Thaddeus Harrington. 

Charles H. Tucker. George K. Walcott. 

C. C. Wooley. G. E. Slack. 



WEIGHERS OF BOILERS AND HEAVY MACHINERY. 

Thaddeus Harrington. Charles H. Tucker. 
George K. Walcott. C. C. Wooley. 

G. E. Slack. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1892. 



13 



UNDERTAKERS. 



William A. Flaherty. 
Edward H. Marsh. 
Alfred E. Mann. 
Horace D. Runey. 
John Ducey. 



Patrick H. Rafferty. 
Thomas J. Barker. 
Patrick Rafferty. 
William A. Frink. 
George F. McKenna. 



Edward McCaffrey. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



xMelville C. Parkhurst, Chief. 



Robert R. Perry, Captain. 
Edward McGarr, Sergeant. 
Dennis Kelley, Sergeant. 
John E. Fuller. 
Albion L. Staples. 
JuDSON W. Oliver. 
George W. Bean. 
George L. Smith. 
Edward M. Carter. 
John F. Johnson. 
Eugene A. Carter. 
Edward E. Hamblen. 
Charles E. Woodman. 
Arthur E. Keating. 
Stephen S. Smith. 
George T. E. Coles. 
Eugene H. Gammon. 
Ira S. Carlton. 
Charles W. Stevens. 



Samuel R. Dow, Sergeant. 
Chris. C. Cavanagh, Sergeant. 
Phineas W. Skinner. 
Samuel A. Brown. 
John Hafford. 
George A. Bodge. 
Theodore E. Heron. 
George H. Carleton. 
Hubert H. Miller. 
Francis A. Perkins. 
Charles S. Thrasher. 
William H. Johnson. 
John G. Knight. 
Jacob W. Skinner. 
David A. Bolton. 
James M. Harmon. 
Michael T. Kennedy. 
Ezra A. Dodge. 
Ulysses G. Skinner. 



Melville C. Parkhurst, Lock-up Keeper. 



MAYOR'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, I 
January 13, 1892. ( 

Ordered, That the committee on printing be and is hereby autliorized and 
instructed to have printed, for public use, six hundred copies of the address 
delivered by his Honor the Mayor at the inauguration of the present City Govern- 
ment, the expense incurred to be charged to Printing and Stationery account. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 13, 1892. 
Read twice and adopted in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



Approved : 

January 15, 1892. WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, Mayor 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 

OF 

HON. WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, 

Delivered Jan. 4, 1892. 



Intrusted by our fellow-citizens with the conduct of the public 
affairs of the city during the present year, we assemble to-day, gentle- 
men of the City Council, to subscribe to the oath of office prescribed 
by the city charter, and formally organize the city government of 1892. 
As we take up the new, or added, responsibilities connected with the 
management of municipal government, it is fitting that we invoke the 
favor of Almighty God, that our city may be exempt from tumult and 
calamity, that we .may be sustained by that power which ruJeth over 
all, and that the government in all its departments may be admin- 
istered in that spirit of righteousness which exalteth the nation. 

Since the organization of the first city government, twenty years 
ago, its has been customary for the newly-inducted mayor to present 
to the City Council at its inauguration a somewhat extended report of 
the condition of the various departments of the public service. In 
the preparation of this address it has seemed to me proper to depart 
somewhat from this custom, for the reason that I approach the duties 
of public office after an interval of seventeen years, while all the 
members of the new Board of Aldermen and six members of the 
Common Council have been connected with the government during 
the past year, and some of them for two or more years, and are, in 
consequence, already familiar with the condition of these depart- 
ments. Besides, I am happy to say that my predecessor at the clos" 
ing session of the City Council of 1891, in a valedictory address which 
has been published in the papers, presented a synopsis of the work 
accomplished during the past three years, including also a brief state- 
ment of the financial condition of the city at the close of the year. 



lo ANNUAL REPORTS. 

This, it seems to me, will prove valuable to us all, and precludes the 
necessity of extended comment at this time. I have endeavored to 
improve the limited opportunity afforded me since the close of the 
year to acquaint myself with the condition of some of the depart- 
ments, and all the reports I have received will be submitted to you at 
an early day. In the discharge of your official duty they will soon, 
claim your careful consideration. They will be submitted in such 
fulness of detail as will enable you to receive all the information 
which I now possess. 

It is difficult, if not impossible, for the mayor-elect, in the 
preparation of an inaugural address, to refer to all, or even many, of 
the important topics which will soon demand the action of the City 
Council, and the city charter has wisely provided that the mayor 
" shall from time to time communicate to both boards such informa- 
tion and recommend such measures as the business of the city may 
in his opinion require." I may desire to avail myself of this privilege 
as I become more familiar with the needs of the city. 

I deem it advisable to include in this address the report of the 
city treasurer as it has been submitted to me. In it he states fully 
and in interesting detail the condition of the 

FINANCES. 

From the last annual report it appears that the funded debt of 
the city January 1, 1891, was as follows : — 

Funded Debt, City Loan $678,000 

Funded Debt, Water Loan 379,500 

Total Funded Debt $1,057,500 

The debt was increased during the year as follows : — 

For the completion of the Charles G. Pope School- 
house in Ward Two ( Prospect Hill District ) . . $14,000 

For the completion of the Jacob T. Glines School- 
house in Ward Three 12,000 

For the completion of the Highland Schoolhouse 

addition 5,000 

For the extension and improvement of the Water 

Works 10,000 

P'or the cost of gravel land on North street .... 4,000 

Total increase $45,000 



mayor's inaugural address. 



19 



The debt was decreased during the year by the payment from 
the tax levy of the following : — 

City Loan Bonds $57,000 

Leaving the Funded Debt January i, 1892, $1,045,500, classified as 
follows, viz. : — 



City Loan Bonds bearing 


interest at 4 per 


cent. . 


. . $470,000 


<( (( (( <( 


(( 


" 5 


(( 


. . 200,000 


Water Loan Bonds " 


i( 


» 4 


(( 


. . 238,000 


(< (( (( i( 


li 


" 5 


(( 


. . 127,500 


(( >( (< (f 


(( 


" 5i 


(( 


. . 10,000 


Total 


. $1,045,500 



The above represents the net indebtedness of the city; the un- 
funded liabilities, for temporary loans, etc., being equalled by its 
assets, which consist of uncollected taxes, sewer and sidewalk assess- 
ments, etc. 

The following tables are respectfully submitted for future 
reference : — 









Reduction of 


Reduction of 


Tax Rate 




Amount 


Increase 


Funded Debt 


Funded Debt 


per 


Year. 


of 


of 


by 


by 


$1,000 




Funded 


Funded 


Contribution to 


Annual 


of Valua- 




Debt. 


Debt. 


Sinking Funds. 


Payments. 


tion. 


Town . . . 


$593,349 










1872 . 






643,354 


$50,005 


. 






1873 . 






809,354 


166,000 








1874 . 






1,419,854 


610,500 


. 






1875 . 






1,571,854 


152,000 








1876 . 






1,606,854 


45,000 


$45,130 62 


$io,6oo 


$2 07 


1877 . 






1,606,854 


10,000 


48,828 58 


10,000 


2 30 


1878 . 






1,596,854 




51,004 64 


10,000 


2 91 


1879 . 

1880 . 






1,585,000 
1,585,000 








53,061 76 
55.739 35 


11,854 


3 42 

2 72 


1881 . 






1,585,000 








58,498 64 




2 59 


1882 . 






1,585,000 








61,390 59 




2 65 


1883 . 






1,585,000 








64,479 01 




2 70 


1884 . 






1,585,000 








67,719 33 




2 78 


1885 . 






*1,525,000 








71,305 66 




2 87 


1886 . 






1,525,000 








66,894 23 




2 57 


1887 . 






1,525,000 








70,252 88 




2 56 


1888 . 






*860,500 


25,000 


. . 


37,000 


1 28 


1889 . 






952,500 


130,000 




38,000 


1 27 


1890 . 






1,057,500 


150.000 


. 


45,000 


1 38 


1891 . 






1,045,500 


45.000 


• • • 


57,000 


1 55 



* Sinking funds applied. 



20 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



^EAR. 


Valuation. 






Tax Levy. 


Rate. 


1872 . . 


. $22,755,325 . . . $274,374 45 . 


. $13 00 


1873 . . 


29.643,100 






. 389,214 48. . 


. 12 80 


1874 . . 


30,837,700 






473,235 50 . 


. 15 00 


1875 . . 


31,317.000 






. 518,161 40 . 


. 16 20 


1876 . . 


. 26 573,400 






504,745 24 . 


. 18 60 


1877 . . 


25,479,400 






471,789 14 . 


. 18 10 


1878 . . 


20,976,900 






409.497 10 . 


. 19 00 


1879 . . 


18,950,100 






352,553 80 . 


18 00 


1880 . . 


20,458,100 






402,927 71 . 


. 19 10 


1881 . . 


22,569,100 






452,945 45 . 


. 19 50 


1882 . . 


23,162.200 






425,721 16 . 


. 17 80 


1883 . . 


23,812,900 






411,645 43 . 


16 70 


1884 . . 


24,331,100 






418,750 26 . 


. 16 60 


1885 . . 


24,878,400 






428,605 44 . 


16 60 


1886 . . 


26,003,200 






416,987 28 . 


15 40 


1887 . . 


27,471,800 






424,309 14 . 


14 80 


1888 . . 


28,765,400 






421,458 60 . 


. 14 00 


1889 . . 


30,004,600 






440,324 40 . 


. 14 00 


1890 . . . 


32.557,500 






447,704 00 . . 


14 00 


1891 . . . 


36 843,440 . 


. 




539,127 10 . . 


14 00 



To provide for the payment of the current expenses, State and 
County taxes, and debt requirements for the past year, the annual 
tax levy was made as follows : — 

Real Estate, valuation $32,767,200 

Personal Property, valuation 4,076,200 

Total valuation $36,843,400 

A rate of $14.00 on $1,000 valuation, with 11,658 
polls assessed at $2.00, and seven ( women ) at 
50 cents, gives the total amount of the tax 
levy $539,127 10 



The appropriations provided for by the tax levy were as fol- 
lows : — 

CURRENT EXPENSES. 
(Limited by the provisions of Chapter 312, Acts and Resolves of 1885.) 

Fire Department ........... $32,000 00 

Plealth Department 7,000 00 

Highways 45,000 00 

Indigent Soldiers and Sailors 500 00 

Miscellaneous . 6,500 00 

Ordinances ( revising ) 500 00 

Police 20,000 00 

Amount carried forward $111,500 00 



MAYOR S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. Zl 

Amount brought forward =, $111,500 00 

Police Station Incidentals 2,500 00 

Public Library 3,000 00 

Public Grounds 3,500 00 

Printing and Stationery 6,000 00 

Relief and Burial of Indigent Soldiers and Sailors, 3,000 00 

Salaries 28,200 00 

School Contingent 21,000 00 

School Fuel 7,500 00 

Schoolhouse Incidentals 13,550 00 

School Teachers' Salaries 102,000 00 

Sewers 10,000 00 

Sidewalks 10,000 00 

Street Lights 22,500 00 

Support of Poor 14,000 00 

Watering Streets 4,000 00 

Total amount that could legally be appropriated, $362,250 Of) 

DEBT REQUIREMENTS. 

Interest $55,000 00 

Reduction of Funded Debt 57,000 00 

112,000 00 

Total amount of appropriations provided by the 

tax levy $474,250 00 

By the provisions of the new ordinance, appropriations were 
made from the income of the water works as follows : — 

Water Maintenance . $20,000 00 

Water Works Extension • • • 35,000 00 

Total $55,000 00 

Several important matters have been referred to you by the last* 
City Council, and will soon engage your attention. I mention them 
in the order in which they have been given to me from the records of 
the city clerk : — 

1. Plans and specifications which have been procured for the 
enlargement of house of Engine Number One, at the corner of High- 
land avenue and Walnut street. 

2. Completion of the Broadway Parkway, in accordance with 
plans submitted by the highway committee of 1891. 

3. Proposition of the trustees of J. C. Ayer estate to give land 
for a park between Cedar street and Willow avenue. 

4. The subject of acquiring land for the enlargement of the pro- 



22 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

posed Powder House Park. The act of the Legislature of 1891, 
authorizing taking of land for this purpose, is inserted for reference. 

[Chap. 311.] 

An Act to authorize the City of Somerville to lay out and main- 
tain a public park. Be it enacted^ etc., as follows : — 

Section 1. The city of Somerville by its city council may, at 
any time within three years after the passage of this act, take, main- 
tain, and hold in fee or otherwise, and by gift upon such conditions 
as the city council may deem advisable, or by purchase or otherwise, 
for the purpose of a public park, the land with the structures thereon 
upon which the Powder House is located in said city, and so much of 
said lands adjacent thereto or in the vicinity of said Powder House as 
said city council shall deem advisable. 

Sect. 2. The said city shall, within sixty days after taking of 
any lands as aforesaid otherwise than by purchase or gift, file and 
cause to be recorded in the registry of deeds for the county of Mid- 
dlesex a description thereof sufficiently accurate for identification, 
with a statement of the purpose for which the same were taken. 

Sect. 3. The said city shall pay all damages sustained by any 
person or corporation in property, by the taking of any lands or by 
any other thing done by said city under the authority of this act. 
Any person or corporation sustaining damages as aforesaid under this 
act, who fails to agree with said city as to the amount of damages sus- 
tained, may have the damages assessed and determined in the manner 
provided by law when land is taken for the laying out of highways, on 
application at any time within the period of three years from the 
taking of such land or other property or the doing of such other 
injury under the authority of this act. 

Sect. 4. All acts heretofore done by said city in regard to taking 
said lands or any of them, by gift or otherwise, for park purposes are 
hereby ratified and made lawful. 

Sect. 5. No money shall be appropriated at any time for the 
laying out or maintaining of said park except upon a two-thirds vote 
of each branch of the city council taken by yea and nay. 

Sect. 6. This act, except as provided in the following section, 
shall not take effect unless accepted by said city of Somerville upon a 
majority vote of each branch of the city council taken by yea and nay. 

Sect. 7. So much of this act as authorizes the submission of the 
question of its acceptance to the city council of Somerville shall take 
effect upon its passage. S^App roved May /, i8gi. 

5. Subject of laying a trunk sewer in location of the Boston & 
Lowell Railroad ; and petitions for various sewers. 

6. Subject of the expediency of the city owning its own water 
supply. 



mayor's inaugural address. 25 



REPORTS. 

The reports of the heads of various departments include requests 
and recommendations which I will briefly state. 

The chief engineer of the lire department requests the City 
Council to provide means for erecting the proposed addition to the 
house of Engine Number One, to furnish accommodations for a chem- 
ical engine, and the apparatus of the fire alarm telegraph system, as 
appears in plans approved by the committee on fire department of 
1891 ; and that preliminary measures be taken to provide a new 
station in Ward One sufiicient in size to provide for a steam fire- 
engine, hose wagon, and ladder truck. 

The chief of police suggests that the number of patrolmen should 
be increased from year to year to keep pace with the increase of 
population, and that the ratio of increase should be, at least, one new 
man for every one thousand of the population. The suggestion seems 
to be reasonable, and I commend it to your consideration. 

The overseers of the poor will, in their forthcoming report, I 
am informed, recommend the erection of a brick building on one of 
the city lots to be used as an almshouse, the cost, including boiler 
and piping, not to exceed $15,000. They are of the opinion that a 
necessity for such a building exists for emergency cases, as well as to 
provide a proper place to care for the poor who need a home at the 
city's expense. This subject has been fully discussed in the inaugural 
addresses of two of my predecessors, and I submit the subject in this 
form, awaiting the annual report of the overseers of the poor. 

There, are topics of a public nature which may be discussed 
more advantageously in the beginning of a new administration than 
at any other time, and I will refer to some which seem to require 
attention and may soon demand our action. The Somerville of to-day 
is developing rapidly and making vigorous strides, both in population 
and valuation. The city of 1872, with a population estimated at 
16,000, and an assessed valuation the year before of §15,775,000, has 
increased in twenty years to a population estimated to be 43,000 and 
an assessed valuation of $36,843,480. During this period of progress- 
our resources have been severely tested in providing schoolhouses,. 
streets, sewers, and other public conveniences required by the great 
increase of population. The growth at the first was in isolated locali- 



24 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ties, in some cases widely separated, so much so that the city appeared 
to be a succession of villages, or small towns, each with its churches, 
schoolhouses, its local attachments, and, possibly, prejudices. As 
means of access both by steam and street railway have been provided 
the various sections have expanded and stretched out toward each 
other. These years have been the formative period of what is to be a 
compact, vigorous city. It has been fortunate in its government. 
Cool heads have guided its affairs, strong, steady hands have borne its 
burdens, and though at times taxation has been somewhat heavy in 
•consequence of public improvements, the government has been con- 
servative and equitable. The wise laws enacted to prevent municipal 
extravagance have been zealously enforced ; the credit of the city has 
not only been unimpaired, but its securities have been among the 
most desirable for safe investment. The moral character of its in- 
habitants has been as creditable as its financial record. Its schools 
are considered equal to those of any other city. Its churches are 
increasing steadily in number and influence; while its constant,, 
unwavering attitude toward the liquor traffic has placed it in the fore 
front of the " no-license " cities of the Commonwealth. 

The responsible duty of maintaining the fair reputation and of 
advancing the material prosperity of the city has been laid upon us. 
Any plan or system designed to accomplish this desired result will 
merit and receive our careful consideiation. There is much we would 
all gladly do to render the name of Somerville synonymous with all 
that stands for enterprise and public spirit, and even civic munificence. 
While we are not favored as other cities not far removed from us with 
citizens of wealth who have contributed of their means and perpetuated 
their memory in the gifts of costly school and public buildings, — 
while all these, so desirable in themselves, mean to Somerville not 
only considerable expenditure of the public money, but the closest 
scrutiny of the public need, yet I believe that the time is at hand 
when these and kindred subjects must be carefully considered with 
special reference to the future welfare of our city. 

I am satisfied from personal observation and reliable reports that 
our highways require considerable outlay to place them in satisfactory 
condition, and that the means to accomplish this should be provided 
as soon as possible. I believe that the tax-payers would not object 
to a more liberal expenditure in the improvement and maintenance 
of streets. The appropriations for highways have not varied much 



mayor's inaugural address. 25 

for several years. When we consider the rapid development of our 
territory, the demand for new and continual repairs required on the 
old streets, together with the disproportion of appropriations to the 
work to be done, the members of the City Government who have had 
charge of the highway department deserve praise for the work 
accomplished with the means at their command. The condition of 
our streets first attracts the attention of one seeking a home in our 
city. They are the first outward indication of what the city furnishes 
the tax-payer in return for his money. Somerville avenue, Medford 
street, Washington street, Broadway near the Boston line, and other 
principal thoroughfares, seem to require more or less extensive 
repairs. In this connection I suggest that you consider the expedi- 
ency of paving Somerville avenue. I do not know that it would be 
possible to accomplish what has been here suggested within the 
narrows limits of a single year; but careful consideration of the street 
department may result in the adoption of a comprehensive plan which 
shall form a basis of systematic improvements to be carried forward 
from year to year until completed. I believe this to be dictated by a 
true economy, which will prevent a large annual expenditure for 
merely temporary repairs. 

There are a few subjects, to which I desire to call the attention 
of the City Council, that it seems to me are worthy of your favorable 
consideration and approval, if, in your opinion, the financial condition 
will admit. 

1. That a larger amount be appropriated for the care and main- 
tenance of streets; that our principal thoroughfares be carefully 
examined with a view to the condition of each, and that the Broadway 
Parkway be completed according to plans already matured. 

2. The subject of providing additional accommodations for the 
High School will probably be brought to your attention at an early 
date. I am not in possession of sufficient evidence to warrant a 
formal recommendation. The subject was considered last year. My 
predecessor and, I believe, a former City Council favored an addition 
on the west side of the building. Some definite action is considered 
imperative. In the regular course of business some plan will be 
submitted to the City Council, and I bespeak for it your careful 
consideration. 

3. I favor a request made by the chairman of the trustees of 
the Public Library for a moderate increase of appropriation for the 



26 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

purchase of books. We all, I believe, will concur in the opinion that 
the library is well managed. Many of the books most in use are worn 
out and should be replaced. The number of issues of books now 
exceeds 100,000 annually. Of late the trustees have sought to 
increase the efBciency of the library by adding the histories of the 
surrounding cities and towns, and gathering all the information 
possible relating to the early history of Somerville and its families. 
Books of this nature soon become scarce and valuable, and it is more 
economical to purchase them at the time of publication than after 
they have passed out of print. 

4. I recommend a proper observance of the semi-centennial 
anniversary of the incorporation of Somerville. An association 
composed of many of our citizens has been organized to secure a 
celebration of the interesting event, and prepare a programme, which 
shall be honorable in itself and worthy of a permanent record. The 
date of the Act of Incorporation is March 3, 1842. Ordinarily it is 
considered desirable to celebrate such events on the day of the event 
commemorated ; but owing to the fact that the weather in March is 
likely to be inclement, and will preclude such an observance as will 
please the majority of our citizens, it has been deemed advisable to 
postpone the celebration until the Seventeenth of June. Such a cele- 
bration will stimulate the public spirit of our citizens and tend to 
develop more interest in the history of the place. I am informed that 
the association may request financial aid from the City Council to 
assist in defraying the expenses of the celebration. Should such a 
request be received, and the appropriation can be legally made, I 
recommend that it be granted, subject to such limitations as the City 
Council may deem advisable. 

5. I favor the erection of a memorial to commemorate the 
services of the soldiers and sailors of Somerville who served in 
the war which crushed rebellion, destroyed slavery, and preserved the 
Union of the States. Whether the memorial shall take the form of 
a substantial and useful public building, or a monumental shaft, as 
suggested by my predecessor one year ago, I will not now presume to 
say. If I believe, as has been said, that ''the truest and best memorial 
already exists in the hearts of the people," I also believe that the 
truest and best expression of it should stand in some visible memorial 
solemnly dedicated to that purpose. I believe that the patriotic 
spirit exhibited by the tax-payers two years ago in their petition for 



mayor's inaugural address. 2T 

the erection of a memorial still lives. This is not the time or place 
to discuss the subject, nor am I wedded to any plan, but I commend 
it to your careful consideration in the firm belief that the city within 
whose limits lies ground made historic by the Continental Army in 
the early days of the Revolution will not fail to commemorate by an 
enduring memorial the services of her own brave sons who sacrificed 
life, or suffered hardship and privation that the American Republic 
might not perish from the earth. 



Gentlemen of the City Council : — 

Eighteen years ago, as a member of the Common Council of 
1874, I subscribed to the oath of office and succeeded in the presi- 
dency of the Council the gentleman who to-day retires from the 
mayoralty. It is a singular coincidence that I am here to-day to 
subscribe to a similar oath, and follow him in the highest office our 
citizens can confer. I will not deny that I receive this trust with 
some degree of solicitude. The duties so familiar to him are new 
and untried to me. He has reached the goal and won his prize, 
while my feet first touch the course. I am grateful to my fellow- 
citizens for the confidence they have reposed in me. I subscribe to 
the oath of office without any mental reservation whatever. I shall 
devote myself with such capacity and energy as I possess to the 
administration of this high trust, and will do all in my power to aid 
you in the responsibilities to which you are called. I ask your co- 
operation and support in efforts to advance the highest interests of 
the city. Without it all personal endeavors may fail. The people 
expect us to be faithful. Let us be loyal servants. Let it be our 
sincere desire and lofty purpose to render honest, impartial, disin- 
terested service, guided by no faction, controlled by no party or 
creed. Thus shall we secure the richest of all rewards — the con- 
sciousness of doing right. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 25, 1893. 
Referred to committee on finance, and sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 27, 1893. 
Referred to committee on finance in concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk pro tern. 



In Committee on Finance, February 14, 1893. 

To the City Council of Somerville : The committee on finance, to which 
was referred the annual report of the treasurer and collector of taxes for the year 
1892, reports that the treasurer's books have been examined by this committee,. 
and compared with the books of the auditor, also with the statements received 
from the several committees, boards, and officers of the city. 

We have also verified the amount of cash on hand by actual count, and by 
the reports from the officers of the banks of deposit, and have discovered no 
errors. 

The committee found that the books and accounts of the treasurer were kept 
in a neat and business-like manner. It is therefore recommended that the report 
be accepted and printed in the annual reports of the year 1892. 

WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, 

FRANK E. FITTS, 

FRANKLIN F. PHILLIPS, 

FRED W. GILBERT, ^ Comnnttee, 

LEWIS STOCKBRIDGE, 

FRED'K A. P. FISKE, 

FRANK W. KAAN, 

CALVIN H. WHITNEY, 



In Board of Aldermen, February ^15, 1893. 
Accepted and sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, ^February 15, 1893. 
Accepted in concurrence. PHii^M'^ it - jgfk ^ ^ 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Treasurer's Office, January 20, 1893. 
To the Honorable the Mayor and City Council of the City of Somerville : 

Gentlemen, — The undersigned presents herewith the twenty- 
first annual report of the financial condition of the city, and a state- 
ment showing in detail the receipts and disbursements for the year 
ending December 31, 1892. 

The value of the property of the city December 31, 1891, was 
$1,685,637.46. The property acquired during the year was as 
follows : — 

Nathan Tufts Park $21,591 45 

Edgerly Schoolhouse addition 11,217 50 

Water-Works extension 34,863 17 

Land on Tufts street . . . . . . . 2,142 00 

The Union Schoolhouse land and building, situated on Prospect 
street, valued in the inventory at $2,600.00, was sold during the year 
for the sum of $2,340.00, and the gravel-land in Winchester, valued at 
$500.00, was sold for that sum, making the value of the public prop- 
erty December 31, 1892, as per Table A, $1,752,351.58. 

The funded debt December 31, 1891, as per Table B of the last 
annual report, was $1,045,500.00. 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 66 to 76, interest at five per 

cent. $11,000 00 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 78 to 88, interest at five per 

cent 11,000 00 

Water Loan Bond No. 281, interest at four per cent. 1,000 00 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 309 to 311, interest at four 

per cent. . 3,000 00 



Amount carried forward . . . . . $26,000 00 



32 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward .... $26,000 00^ 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 395 and 396, interest at four 

per cent 2,000 00 



amounting to . . . . . . . . |28,000 00 

became due during the year and were renewed by issuing the 
following : — 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 448 to 458, payable 1900, in- 
terest at four per cent. $11,000 00 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 459 to 468, payable 1901, in- 
terest at four per cent. ..... 10,000 00 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 469 to 475, payable 1902, in- 
terest at four per cent. ..... 7,000 00 



amounting to $28,000 00 

The following city loan bonds became due during the year, and 
were paid from the appropriation and the dividends received from 
the Maverick National Bank, viz. : — 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 721 to 798, interest at four per 

cent $78,000 00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 924 to 928, interest at four per 

cent , 5,000 00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1,013 to 1,022, interest at four 

per cent 10,000 00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1,107 to 1,110, interest at four 

percent 4,000 00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1,147 to 1,153, interest at four 

per cent 7,000 00 



amounting to $104,000 00 

To provide funds for current expenses in anticipation of the 
dividends to be received from the Maverick National Bank the 
following bonds were issued : — 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1,224 to 1,233, payable]1893, 

interest at four per cent. . . . . . $10,000 00 



Amou7it carried forward . . . . . • $10,0U0 00 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



33 



Amount brought 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 

interest at four per 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 

interest at four per 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 

interest at four per 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 

interest at four per 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 

interest at four per 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 

interest at four per 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 

interest at four per 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 

interest at four per 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 

interest at four per 

amounting to 



forward 


. 


. $10,000 00 


1,234 to 1,243, 


payable 1894 




cent. 


, , 


10,000 00 


1,244 to 1,253, 


payable 1895, 




cent. 


, , 


.' 10,000 00 


1,254 to 1,263, 


payable 1896 




cent. 




10,000 00 


1,264 to 1,273, 


payable 1897, 




cent. 


. 


10,000 00 


1,274 to 1,283, 


payable 1898, 




cent. 


. . 


10,000 00 


1,284 to 1,293, 


payable 1899, 




cent. 


, 


10,000 00 


1,294 to 1,303, 


payable 1900, 




cent. 


, 


10,000 00 


1,304 to 1,313, 


payable 1901, 




cent. 


. 


10,000 00 


1,314 to 1,323, 


payable 1902, 




cent. 




10,000 00 




$100,000 00 



To provide for the cost of paving Union square and parts of 
Somerville and Webster avenues, the following bonds, authorized by 
a special act of the Legislature, and not to be considered or reckoned 
in determining the limit of indebtedness, were issued 



City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 1 to 5, 

interest at four per cent. 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 6 to 10, 

interest at four per cent. 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 11 to 15, 

interest at four per cent. 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 16 to 20, 

interest at four per cent. 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 21 to 25, 

interest at four per cent. 



payable 1893 
payable 1894 
payable 1895 
payable 1896 
payable 1897 



$5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 



Amount carried forward 



$25,000 00 



34 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 26 to oO, payable 1898 

interest at four per cent. .... 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 31 to 35, payable 1899 

interest at four per cent. .... 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 36 to 40, payable 1900 

interest at four per cent. .... 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 41 to 45, payable 1901 

interest at four per cent. .... 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 46 to 50, payable 1902 

interest at four per cent. . . . . 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 51 to 55, payable 1903 

interest at four per cent. .... 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 56 to 60, payable 1904 

interest at four per cent. .... 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 61 to 65, payable 1905 

interest at four per cent. .... 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 66 to 70, payable 1906 

interest at four per cent. .... 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 71 to 75, payable 1907 

interest at four per cent. .... 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 76 to 80, payable 1908 

interest at four per cent. .... 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 81 to 85, payable 1909 

interest at four per cent. .... 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 86 to 90, payable 1910 

interest at four per cent. .... 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 91 to 95, payable 1911 

interest at four per cent. .... 
City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 96 to 100, payable 1912 

interest at four per cent. . . . . 

amounting to ....... , 

making the funded debt December 31, 1892, as 
$1,141,500.00. 



$25,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

$100,000 00 

per Table B, 



The funded debt was further increased during the year by 
appropriations made as follows : — 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 35 

Nathan Tufts Park . . . . ... $25,00000 

Schoolhouse, Edgerly improvement .... 20,000 00 

Sewers in West Somerville 8,000 00 



amounting to . . . . . . . . $53,000 00 

In consequence of the opinion of the attorney-general, that 
money borrowed temporarily in anticipation of the collection of taxes 
should be included in ascertaining the authorized limit of municipal 
indebtedness, the bonds for the above mentioned appropriations, 
amounting to $53,000.00, were not issued. But as the money has 
been expended and must hereafter be provided, either by issuing 
bonds or including the amount in the tax l(ivy, it is proper to con- 
sider it part of the funded debt, which, after deducting a balance of 
$40,081.75 standing to the credit of reduction of funded debt account, 
makes the net funded debt amount to $1,154,418.29. 

The current expenses, public improvements, state and county 
taxes, and debt requirements were provided for by the following 

RESOURCES. 

Assessors' warrant for the tax levy, assessed upon the polls and 
estates of the inhabitants as follows, viz. : — 

Real estate, valuation $34,950,800 00 

Personal property, valuation .... 3,142,300 00 



Total valuation . . . . . $38,093,100 00 

A rate of $15.00 on $1,000 valuation, with 
9,855 single polls, 
2,620 property polls, 



12,475 polls at $2.00 each, and 22 (women) at 

$0.50 each, gives the total amount of the tax 

levy $596,357 50 

Borrowed on funded debt account to provide for 

the cost of public improvements . . . 153,000 00 

Revenue from the water works .... 77,640 91 



Amount carried forward .... $826,998 41 



36 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought Jorward .... $826,998 41 

State corporation and bank taxes . . . 17,250 07 

Received from various sources .... 43,822 34 

Received Maverick Bank dividends . . . 77,185 00 

Unexpended balances from 1891 . . . 12,725 43 



Total amount of resources . . . $977,981 25 



23 41 




251 95 






$5,545 17 




4 06 



The appropriations, credits, and balances of the various accounts 
were as follows : — 

Accounts. Appropriations. Credits. Expenditures 

and Balances. 

Broadway Parkway : — 

Received from Overlay and 

Abatement account . . $4,500 00 

Received from Schoolhouse in 

Ward Three account . . $773 87 

Received from Highland School- 
house Addition account 

Received for loam, etc. 

Expenditures . . . . 

Unexpended balance . 

Fire Department : — 

Appropriation .... 37,000 00 

Received for old materials, etc. 194 73 

Expenditures .... 40,991 94 

Deficiency . . . . . 3,797 21 

Health Department : — 

Appropriation .... 8,000 00 

Received for permits, licenses, 

etc 263 00 

Expenditures .... 11,816 76 

Deficiency 3,553 76 

Highways : — - 

Appropriation .... 55,000 00 

Received for labor and materials, 4,199 70 

Expenditures .... 58,863 29 

Unexpended balance . . . 336 41 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 37 



Accounts. Appropriations. Credits. Expenditures 

and Balances. 

Highways, Paving Union square and 
parts of Somerville and 
Webster avenues : — 

Appropriation, Funded Debt ac- 
count . . - . . . $100,000 00 
Received for labor and materials, $351 86 

Expenditures .... $96,249 77 

Balance unexpended to 1893 . 4,102 09 

Indigent Soldiers and Sailors : — 

Appropriation .... 500 00 
Received from State of Massa- 
chusetts 587 00 

Expenditures .... 1,174 00 

Deficiency ..... 87 00 

Interest : — 

Appropriation . $57,000 00 
Transferred to other 
accounts . 12,500 00 

44,500 00 

Received interest on taxes, etc. 10,013 46 

Expenditures . . . . 42,909 26 

Unexpended balance ... 11,604 20 

Miscellaneous : — 

Appropriation . . $5,000 00 
Transferred from In- 
terest account . , 3,700 00 

8,700 00 



Received costs on taxes and 

assessments, licenses, etc. . 3,826 85 

Expenditures . • . . . 17,125 85 

Deficiency 4^599 qO 

J^athan Tufts Park : — 

Appropriation, Funded Debt ac- 
count . . . . 25,000 00 
Received for old house, etc. 170 50 
Expenditures .... . 21,761 95 
Unexpended balance to 1893 . 3,408 55 



38 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Accounts. 
Overlay and Abatement : — 

Appropriation 
Transferred to other 
accounts 



,271 95 
8,823 99 



Applied and to be applied to 
abatements on taxes i . 



Appropriations. Credits. 



$13,447 96 



Expenditures 
and Balances. 



$13,447 96 



Police : — 

Appropriation . . . . 
Received bank and corporation 

taxes 

Received court fees, fines, etc. 
Expenditures . . . . 
Unexpended balance . 

Police Station Incidentals : — 

Appropriation . . . . 
Received for rent 
Expenditures .... 
Unexpended balance 

Printing and Stationery : — 

Appropriation .... 
Received discount on bill . 
Expenditures .... 
Deficiency .... 

Public Grounds : — 

Appropriation . $4,300 00 

Transferred from In- 
terest account . . 1,400 00 



Received for grading . 
Expenditures ... 
Unexpended balance . 

Public Library : — 

Appropriation . . . . 
Received, dog licenses, fines, etc. 
Balance from 1891 . . . 
Expenditures « . • • 
Deficiency balance to 1893 . 



24,000 00 



3,500 00 



6,300 00 



5,700 00 



4,000 00 



$17,250 07 




2,071 90 






42,989 21 




332 76 



430 00 



8 25 



567 12 



3,775 68 
154 32 



6,853 46 
545 21 



6,259 60 

7 52 



1,462 01 




3 48 






5,80C 93 




335 44 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



39 



Accounts. 

iReduction of Funded Debt : — 

Appropriation .... 

Received Maverick Bank divi- 
dends . . . . 

Received of City of Boston, 
water rates .... 

Expenditures .... 

Balance to be expended in 1893, 

Relief and Burial of Indigent Sol- 
diers and Sailors : — 

Appropriation 

Received from State of Massa 

chusetts .... 
Expenditures 
Deficiency .... 

Salaries : — 

Appropriation ... 
Expenditures .... 
Deficiency 

School Teachers' Salaries : — 

Appropriation .... 
Expenditures .... 
Deficiency ..... 

School Contingent : — 

Appropriation .... 
Received for tuition of non-resi- 
dent pupils, etc. 
Expenditures .... 
Deficiency 

School Contingent, Janitors' Sala- 
ries : — 

Appropriation 

Expenditures .... 

Unexpended balance . 

School Fuel : — 

Appropriation .... 
Expenditures .... 
Unexpended balance . . . 



Appropriations. Credits. 



Expenditures 
and Balances, 



$60,000 00 



3,000 00 



31,085 00 



108,000 00 



13,000 00 



10,000 00 



7,150 00 



$Y7,185 00 
6,896 71 



87 50 



65 00 



$104,000 00 
40,081 71 



4,029 92 
942 42 



31,451 20 
366 20 



.108,058 81 
58 81 



13,196 81 
131 81 



9,794 92 
205 08 



7,147 68 
2 32 



40 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Accounts. 

Schoolhouse Incidentals : — 

Appropriation . $10,000 00 
Transferred from In- 
terest account . . 1,500 00 



Appropriations. 



Credits. 



Schoolhouse in Ward Two : — 

Balance from 1891 
Expenditures .... 

Schoolhouse in Ward Two, Prospect 
Hill District : — 

Balance from 1891 

Transferred from Highland 

Schoolhouse addition 
Expenditures .... 
Unexpended balance to 1893 

Schoolhouse, Edgerly addition : — 

Appropriation, Funded Debt 
account ..... 
Expenditures .... 
Unexpended balance to 1893 

Schoolhouse in Ward Three: — 

Balance from 1891 . $773 87 

Transferred to Broad- 
way Parkway ac- 
count . . .773 87 



Schoolhouse, Highland addition : — 

Balance from 1891 . $318 03 
Transferred to other 

accounts . . 318 03 



Semi-Centennial Celebration : — 

Transferred from Interest ac- 
count 

Expenditures . . . . 
Unexpended balance to 1893 . 



600 00 



856 26 
294 62 



20,000 00 



5,700 00 



Expenditures 
and Balances. 



Received proceeds of sale of land 


$11,500 00 






on Prospect street . 




$2,340 00 




Received for old materials, etc. 




137 07 




Expenditures .... 






$17,734 18 


Deficiency ..... 






3,757 11 



600 00 



260 88 
890 00 



11,217 50 

8,782 50 



5,535 11 
164 89 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



41 



Accounts. 

Sewers : — 

Appropriation .... 
" Funded Debt ac- 

count ..... 
Received for permits, etc. . 
Expenditures .... 
Unexpended balance to 1893 

Sidewalks : — 

Appropriation .... 
Received for labor, material, etc. 
Expenditures .... 
Deficiency ..... 

State of Massachusetts : — 

Appropriation . . . . 
Expended, State Tax . 

County of Middlesex : — 

Appropriation .... 
Expended, County Tax 

Street Lights : — 

Appropriation 

Expended . . . . 

Unexpended balance . 

Support of Poor : — 

Appropriation .... 
Received for support of paupers, 

aid furnished, etc. . 
Expenditures . . . 
Unexpended balance . 

Watering Streets : — 
Appropriation 

Transferred from Interest acct 
Received from abutters 
Expenditures 
Unexpended balance 

Water Loan Interest : — 

Received of City of Boston, 
water rates, including balance 
from 1891, $5,150 80 
Expenditures .... 



Appropriations. 

$10,000 00 
8,000 00 



Credits. Expenditures 

and Balances. 



10,000 00 



27,457 50 



30,657 03 



27,000 00 



14,000 00 



5,000 00 
200 00 



$656 54 



617 54 



3,099 90 



7,984 77 



15,895 00 



$15,550 29 
3,106 25 



10,661 53 
43 99 



27,457 50 



30,657 03 



26,529 45 
470 55 



17,015 30 
84 60 



12,828 06 
356 71 



15,895 00 



42 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Accounts. 

Water Maintenance : — 

Received of City of Boston, 
water rates .... 

Received for labor and materials, 

Received from Water Service 
account ..... 

Balance from 1891 . . . 

Expenditures .... 

Unexpended balance to 1893 

Water-works Extension: — 

Balance from 1891 
Received from City of Boston, 
water rates .... 
Received for labor and materials , 
Expenditures .... 
Unexpended balance to 1893 

State of Massachusetts : — 

Metropolitan Sewer Account : — 
Appropriation .... 
Expended, Sewer Tax 

Excess and Deficiency : — 

Transferred from Overlay and 
Abatement account to provide 
for accounts overdrawn . 



Appropriations. 



J,136 02 



4,323 99 



Credits. 


Expenditures 
and Balances. 


$29,000 00 




1,414 08 




760 14 




599 58 






$30,689 87 




1,083 9S 



4,423 41 

31,000 00 
2,261 47 



$749,357 50 $228,623 75 
228,623 75 



37,124 64 
560 24 



3,136 02 



$977,981 25 



$977,981 25 



$977,981 25 



RECAPITULATION. 



Appropriations as per tax levy . 

Appropriations as per Funded Debt 
account 

Received, revenue from water works, 

Received, State Bank and Corpora- 
tion Taxes ..... 

Received from various sources . 

Received Maverick National Bank 
dividends 

Amount carried forward . 



$596,357 50 

153,000 00 
77,640 91 

17,250 07 
43,822 34 

77,185 00 
,255 82 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



43 



Amount brought forward , . $965,255 82 




Balance from 1891 .... 12,725 43 




Expenditures 


$916,136 53 


Balances to be expended in 1893 


61,844 72 


$977,981 25 


$977,981 25 


The assets of the city available for the payment of its unfunded 


liabilities are as follows: — 




Cash 


139,653 03 


City loan bonds . . . . . . . 


53,000 00 


Public Library . . . . . 


335 44 


Real-estate liens . . . . . 


888 40 


Sewer assessments . . . . . 


5,143 96 


Sidewalk assessments ..... 


5,571 00 


State of Massachusetts, indigent soldiers and sailors 


573 00 


State of Massachusetts, burial of indigent soldiers 




and sailors . . . . . . 


175 00 


State of Massachusetts, State aid 


6,669 50 


Taxes ........ 


179,403 80 


Water-service assessments .... 


1,722 00 


Total amount of available assets 


. $293,135 13 


The liabilities are : — 




Highways, paving Union square and parts of Somer 




ville and Webster avenues 


14,102 09 


Nathan Tufts Park 


3,408 55 


Overlay and abatement ..... 


2,402 74 


Overplus on tax sales 


102 13 


Reduction of funded debt ..... 


40,081 71 


Schoolhouse in Ward Two, Prospect Hill District 


890 00 


Schoolhouse, Edgerly addition .... 


8,782 50 


Semi-Centennial Celebration . . . . 


164 89 


Sewer accounts ...... 


3,106 25 


Sundry persons ...... 


450 10 


Temporary loans . . . . . . . 


228,000 00 


Water maintenance . . .... 


1,083 93 


Water-works extension ..... 


560 24 


Total amount of unfunded liabilities 


$293,135 13 



44 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The financial condition of the city, exclusive of its public prop- 
erty, is as follows : — 

City Loan Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent. . $466,000 00 

a u u u u " 5 u " . . 165,000 00 

City Loan taving Bonds bearing interest at 4 per 

cent 100,000 00 

City Loan Sewer Bonds bearing interest at 5 per 

cent. 35,000 00 

Water Loan Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent. . 260,000 00 

" " " " " '' 5 " '' < . 105,500 00 

" " " " " " b% " . 10,000 00 

City Loan Bonds not issued . . . . . 53,000 00 

Total amount of City Loan Bonds, $819,000 00 

" Water Loan Bonds, 375,500 00 



Total funded debt $1,194,500 00 

There is standing to the credit of reduction of funded debt ac- 
count the sum of $40,081.71, of which $33,185.00 is to be applied to 
the reduction of the city debt and $6,896.71 to the reduction of the 
water debt, leaving the net funded debt December 31, 1892, as 
follows : — 

Funded debt, city loan $785,815 00 

Funded debt, water loan 368,603 29 



Net indebtedness December 31, 1892 . . $1,154,418 29 

Total cash receipts for the year, including balance 

of $37,007.03 from the year 1891 . . . $1,603,952 72 

Total cash disbursements . . . . . 1,564,299 69 



Leaving in the treasury the sum of . . $39,653 03 

A detailed statement of the public property, funded debt, and 
the receipts and disbursements of the various accounts will appear 
in the appendix. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN F. COLE, 

2reasurer. 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



TABLE A. 



PUBLIC PROPERTY DEC. 31, 1892. 



Central Hill land ( 12 acres, 27,920 feet ) . . . 
City Hall . . . . . . ^10,000 00 



Furniture .... 

Public Library .... 

Public Library building 

Steam fire-engine house 

Furniture . . . . 

Steam fire-engine and apparatus 
Steam fire-engine, hose carriage 
and apparatus 

High Schoolhouse 

Furniture .... 

Philosophical apparatus 



3,000 00 



$10,000 00 

500 00 

4,000 00 

2,000 00 

$40,000 00 

3,500 00 

500 00 



Prescott Schoolhouse, land (21,444 feet) 

and building .... $40,000 00 
Furniture 2,000 00 



Luther V. Bell Schoolhouse, land 

(23,396 feet) and building . . $40,000 00 
Furniture 3,000 00 



$100,000 00 



13,000 00 

8,500 00 

28.338 45 



16,500 00 



44,000 00 



42,000 00 



43,000 00 



Amount carried forward 



$295,338 45 



46 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward ..... $295,338 45 
Forster Schoolhouse, land (27,499 feet) 

and building .... $37,922 24 

Furniture 1,500 00 

39,422 24 



Morse Schoolhouse, land (29,109 feet) 

and building $56,334 95 

Furniture . . . . . 1,696 52 



Highland Schoolhouse, land (23,260 

feet) and building . . . $51,68197 
Furniture 1,624 60 



Lincoln Schoolhouse, land (17,662 feet) 

and building .... $14,742 17 
Furniture . . . . . 744 93 



Prospect Hill Schoolhouse, land (25,313 

feet ) and building . . . $20,000 00 
Furniture 600 00 



Jackson Schoolhouse, land (11,212 feet) 

and building . ... $8,000 00 
Furniture 300 00 



Bennett Schoolhouse, land (20,560 feet) 

and building .... $8,000 00 
Furniture . ... . . 300 00 



Webster Schoolhouse, land ( 11,050 feet) 

and building .... $8,000 00 
Furniture . . . . . 300 00 



Harvard Schoolhouse, land (9,810 feet) 

and building .... $2,500 00 
Furniture 100 00 



58,031 47 



53,306 57 



15,487 10 



20,600 00 



8,300 00 



8,300 00 



8,300 00 



— 2,600 00 

Amount carried forward ..... $509,685 83 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 47 

Amount brought forward ..... $509,685 83 
.Edgerly Schoolhouse, land ( 26,428 feet) 

and building .... $42,000 00 

Furniture 1,100 00 

43,100 00 



Brastow Schoolhouse, land (10,019 feet) 

and building . . . . $6,000 00 
Furniture 250 00 



Franklin Schoolhouse, land (33,017 feet) 

and building .... $14,000 00 

Furniture . . . . . 300 OC 



Beach-street Schoolhouse, land (6,000 

feet) and building . . . $4,500 00 
Furniture 250 00 



Spring Hill Schoolhouse, land (4,991 

feet) and building . . . $1,600 00 
Furniture 100 00 



Davis Schoolhouse, Tufts street, land 

(88,152 feet) and building . . $19,748 22 
Furniture 726 99 



Cummings Schoolhouse, School street, 

land (11,300 feet) and building, $14,643 21 
Furniture . . . . . 714 16 



Bingham Schoolhouse, Lowell street, 

land (21,017 feet) and building, $14,553 56 
Furniture ..... 551 33 



Burns Schoolhouse, Cherry street, land 

(16,080 feet) and building . . $14,662 40 
Furniture 587 12 



6,250 00 



14,300 00 



4,750 00 



1,700 00 



20,475 21 



15,357 37 



15,104 89 



15,249 52 

Amount carried forward . . . . . $645,972 82 



48 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . . . . . 
O. S. Knapp Schoolhouse, Concord 
square, land (24,517 feet) and 

building $31,851 81 

Furniture . . . . . 1,123 08 



$645,972 82 



32,974 89 



Charles G. Pope Schoolhouse, Washing- 
ton street, land (27,236 feet) and 
building . . . . . $63,143 74 
Furniture . . . . . 1,747 48 



Jacob T. Glines Schoolhouse, Jaques 
street, land (28,800 feet) and 

building $46,226 13 

Furniture 981 57 



64,891 22 







47,207 70 


City Farm, land (10 acres, 12,523 feet) 


. 


30,000 00 


Cedar-street Schoolhouse 


$700 00 




Furniture ..... 


100 00 


800 00 


City stables and dwelling-houses . 


. 


<J\J\J \J\} 

7,000 00 


Equipments for highway repairs 


. 


7,750 00 


Watering-carts and sheds 


■ 


2,300 00 


No. 1 Hose-house, land (4,312 feet) and 






building ..... 


$2,300 00 




Furniture ..... 


400 00 




John E. Wool hose carriage and 






apparatus ..... 


2,000 00 


4,700 00 


' 




>[o. 2 Hose-house, land ( 5,400 feet) and 






building ..... 


$7,500 00 




Furniture . . . . rf. 


300 00 




Winter Hill hose carriage and ap- 






paratus ..... 


, 2,000 00 


9,800 00 






Amount carried forward 


$853,396 63 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



49 



Amount brought forward .'.... 
No. 3 Hose-house, land (5,226 feet) and 

building $9,000 00 

Furniture . ... . 300 00 

George H. Foster hose carriage and 

apparatus . . . . . 2,000 00 

R. A. Vinal hook-and-ladder truck 

and apparatus .... 3,400 00 

Prescott hook-and-ladder truck and 

apparatus ..... 100 00 



1853,396 63 



No. 4 Hose-house, land (9,100 feet) and 

building $11,000 00 

Furniture 400 00 

George O. Brastow hose carriage 

and apparatus .... 2,000 00 

Relief hose carriage . . . 600 00 

Steam fire-engine and equipment .... 
No. 5 Hose-house, land ( 39,456 feet ) and 

building $16,113 68 

Furniture and apparatus . . 2,630 94 

Fire-alarm telegraph 

Police-station, land (15,232 feet) and 

building (Bow street) . . . $40,000 00 

Furniture 3,000 00 



Police stable ....... 

Prospect street, land (7,918 feet) and building 
Public Park ( cost $212,993.20) . 
Joy street, land (2,960 feet) . 
Walnut street, land (10,980 feet) . 
Elm street, land ( 18,000 feet ) 
Holland street (5 acres, 6,806 feet) 
Gravel-land in Waltham ( about 35 acres ) 
Gravel-land in Wakefield ( about 1^ acres ) 



14,800 00 



14,000 00 
4,515 00 



18,744 62 

15,800 00 



43,000 00 

3,858 35 

7,000 00 

125,000 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

3,600 00 

12,000 00 

15,000 00 

5,000 00 



Amount carried forward 



. $1,237,214 60 



50 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward ' . 
Gravel-land on North street ..... 
The Nathan Tufts Park ( unfinished ) . . 
Edgerly Schoolhouse Improvement (unfinished) 
Somerville water-works (cost f 572,048.52) . 
Oliver street, land (63,069 feet) .... 
Whipple street, land, lots Nos. 30 and 31 ( 15,240 feet). 



$1,237,214 m 

4,000 oa 

21,591 45 

11,217 50 

570,439 76 

7,500 OO 

388 27 



Total value of public property 



1,752,351 5g 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



51 



TABLE B. 

FUNDED DEBT DECEMBER 31, 1892. 

CITY LOAN BONDS. 



Date. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


January 1, 1892. 


1,224 to 1,233 


4 


Jan. 1, 1893. 


$1,000 


$10,000 


July 1, 1885. 


856 to 880 


4 


July 1, 


1893. 


1,000 


25,000 


October 1, 1884. 


799 to 852 


4 


Oct. 1 


1893. 


1,000 


54,000 


October 1, 1889. 


929 to 933 


4 


Oct. 1, 


1893. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1890. 


1,023 to 1,032 


4 


Oct. 1 


1893. 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1, 1890. 


1,111 to 1,114 


4 


Oct. 1 


1893. 


1,000 


4,000 


October 1, 1891. 


1,154 to 1,160 


4 


Oct. 1 


1893. 


1,000 


7,000 


January 1, 1892. 


1,234 to 1,243 


4 


Jan. 1, 


1894. 


1,000 


10,000 


July], 1888. 


887 to 909 


4 


Julyl 


1894. 


1,000 


23,000 


October 1, 1889. 


934 to 938 


4 


Oct. 1 


189J. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1890. 


1,033 to 1,042 


4 


Oct. 1 


1894. 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1, 1890. 


1,115 to 1,118 


4 


Oct. 1 


1894. 


1,000 


4,000 


October 1, 1891. 


1,161 to 1,167 


4 


Oct. 1 


1894. 


1,000 


7,000 


January 1, 1892. 


1,244 to 1,253 


4 


Jan. 1 


1895. 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1, 1876. 


190 to 194 


5 


Oct. 1 


1895. 


1,000 


25,000 


October 1, 1876. 


195 to 334 


5 


Oct. 1 


1895. 


1,000 


140,000 


October 1, 1889. 


939 to 943 


4 


Oct. 1 


1895. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1590. 


1,043 to 1,052 


4 


Oct. 1 


1895. 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1, 1890. 


1,119 to 1,122 


4 


Oct. 1 


1895. 


1,000 


4,000 


October 1, 1891. 


1,168 to 1,174 


4 


Oct. 1 


1895. 


1,000 


7,000 


January 1, 1892. 


1,254 to 1,263 


4 


Jan. 1 


1896. 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1, 1889. 


944 to 948 


4 


Oct. 1 


1896. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1890. 


1,053 to 1,062 


4 


Oct. 1 


1896. 


2,000 


10,000 


October 1, 1890. 


1,123 to 1,126 


4 


Oct. 1 


, 1896: 


1,000 


4,000 


October 1, 1891. 


1,175 to 1,181 


4 


Oct. 1 


, 1896. 


1,000 


7,000 


January 1, 1892. 


1,264 to 1,273 


4 


Jan. 1 


, 1897. 


1,000 


10,000 


Amount 


carried forward 








$421,000 













52 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE B. — CITY LOAN BONDS. 



Coiuhided. 



Date. 



Amount 
July 1, 1888. 
October 1, 1889. 



October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
January 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
January 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
January 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
January 1 
October 1 
October 1 
January 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 



1890. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1889. 
1890. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1889. 
1890. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1890. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1891. 
1891. 
1891. 
1891. 
Total 



Number of Bonds. 



brought forward 
910 to 913 
949 to 969 
1,063 to 1,072 
1,127 to 1,130 
1,182 to 1,188 
1,274 to 1,283 

970 to 993 
1,073 to 1,082 
1,131 to 1,134 
1,189 to 1,195 
1,284 to 1,293 
994 to 1,002 
1,083 to 1,092 
1,135 to 1,138 
1,196 to 1,202 
1,294 to 1,303 
1,093 to 1,102 
1,139 to 1,142 
1 203 to 1,208 
1,301 to 1,313 
1,143 to 1,146 
1,209 to 1,211 
1,314 to 1,323 
1,212 to 1,214 
1,215 to 1,217 
1,218 to 1,220 
1,221 to 1,223 
amoimt of City 



Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 



4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
Loan 



When due. 



July] 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Jan. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Jan. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Jan. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Jan. I 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Jan. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Bonds 



1897. 
1897. 
1897. 
1897. 
1897. 
1898. 
1898. 
1898. 
1898. 
1898. 
1899. 
1899. 
1899. 
1899. 
1899. 
1900. 
1900. 
19U0. 
19' 0. 
1901. 
I'OOl. 
1901. 
1902. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 



Denomi- 
nation. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



Amount. 

$421,000 

4,000 

21,000 

10,000 

4,000 

7,000 

10,000 

24,000 

10,000 

4,000 

7,000 

10,000 

9,000 

10,000 

4,000 

7,000 

10,000 

10,000 

4,000 

6,000 

10,000 

4,000 

3,000 

10,000 

3,000 

3,000 

3,000 

3,000 

$631,000 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



5S 



TABLK B. — Continued. 
SEWER LOAN BONDS. 



Date. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


July 1, 1876. 


1 to 7 


5 


July 1, 1896. 


$5,000 


$35,000 



WATER LOAN BONDS. 



Date. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


July 1, 1888. 


282 


4 


July 1, 1893. 


$1,000 


$1,000 


October 1, 1885. 


89 to 99 


5 


Oct. 1, 1893. 


1,000 


11,000 


October 1, 1889. 


312 to 314 


4 


Oct. 1, 1893. 


1,000 


3,00a 


October 1, 1890. 


397 to 398 


4 


Oct. 1, 1893. 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888. 


283 


4 


July 1, 1894. 


1,000 


1,000- 


October 1, 1881. 


100 to 111 


5 


Oct. 1, 1894. 


1,000 


12,000 


October 1, 1889. 


315 to 317 


4 


Oct. 1, 1894. 


1,000 


3,000- 


October 1, 1890. 


399 to 400 


4 


Oct. 1, 1894. 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888. 


284 


4 


July 1, 1895. 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1882. 


112 to 124 


5 


July 1, 1895. 


1,000 


13,000 


October 1, 1889. 


318 to 320 


4 


Oct. 1, 1895. 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890. 


401 to 402 


4 


Oct. 1, 1895. 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1882. 


125 to 136 


5 


July 1, 1896. 


1,000 


12,000 


July 1, 1882. 


137 


5 


July 1, 1896. 


500 


500 


July 1, 1888. 


285 


4 


July 1, 1896. 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889. 


321 to 323 


4 


Oct. 1, 1896. 


1,000 


3,000' 


October 1, 1890. 


403 to 404 


4 


Oct. 1, 1896. 


1,000 


2,000' 


July 1, 1882. 


138 to 151 


5 


July 1, 1897. 


1,000 


14,000 


July 1, 1888. 


286 


4 


July 1, 1897. 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889. 


324 to 326 


4 


Oct. 1, 1897. 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890. 


405 to 406 


4 


Oct. 1, 1897. 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1882. 


152 to 166 


5 


July 1, 1898. 


1,000 


15,000 


Amount 


carried forward 


. . . 




. . . 


$107,500 



M 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE B. — WATER LOAN BONDS. 



Continued. 



Date. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


Amount 


brought forward 


. 


. . 




$107,500 


July 1, 1888. 


287 


4 


July 1, 1898. 


$1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889. 


327 to 329 


4 


Oct. 1 


1898. 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890. 


407 to 408 


4 


Oct. 1 


, 1898. 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1882. 


167 to 181 


5 


Julyl 


1899. 


1,000 


15,000 


July 1, 1882. 


182 


5 


Julyl 


1899. 


500 


500 


July 1, 1888. 


288 


4 


Julyl 


1899. 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889. 


330 to 342 


4 


Oct. 1 


1899. 


1,000 


13,000 


October 1, 1890. 


409 to 410 


4 


Oct. 1 


1899. 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1882. 


183 to 194 


5 


Julyl 


, 1900. 


1,000 


12,000 


July 1, 1882. 


195 


5 


Julyl 


1900. 


500 


500 


July 1, 1888. 


289 


4 


Julyl 


1900. 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1884. 


200 to 202 


4 


Oct. 1 


1900. 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1889. 


343 to 344 


4 


Oct. 1 


1900. 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890. 


416 to 417 


4 


Oct. 1 


1900. 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1892. 


rt448 to «458 


4 


Oct. 1 


1900. 


1,000 


11,000 


July 1, 1888. 


290 


4 


Julyl 


1901. 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1884. 


203 to 212 


4 


Oct. 1 


1901. 


1,000 


10,000 


October ], 1892. 


a459 to 468 


4 


Oct. 1 


1901. 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1885. . 


214 to 219 


4 


Julyl 


1901. 


1,000 


6,000 


October 1, 1889. 


345 to 346 


4 


Oct. 1 


1901. 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890. 


418 to 419 


4 


Oct. 1 


1901. 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1885. 


220 to 226 


4 


Julyl 


1902. 


1,000 


7,000 


July 1, 1886. 


229 to 238 


4 


Julyl 


1902. 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1, 1889. 


347 to 348 


4 


Oct. 1 


1902. 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890. 


420 to 421 


4 


Oct. 1 


1902. 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1892. 


469 to 475 


4 


Oct. 1 


1902. 


1,000 


7,000 


July 1, 1886. 


239 to 256 


4 


Julyl 


1903. 


1,000 


18,000 


Amount 


carried forward 




.... 


. . . 


$253,500 



, APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



55 



TABLE B. — WATER LOAN BONDS. 



Continued. 



Date. 



Amount 
October 1, 1889. 
October 1, 1890. 
July 1, 1886. 
October 1, 1889. 
October 1, 1890. 
October 1, 1889. 
October 1, 1890. 
July 1, 1876. 
October 1, 1889. 
October 1, 1890. 
July 1, 1886. 
July 1, 1888. 
October 1, 1889. 
October 1, 1890. 
July 1, 1888. 
October 1, 1889. 
October 1, 1890. 
July 1, 1888. 
October 1, 1889. 
October 1, 1890. 
July 1, 1888. 
October 1, 1889. 
October 1, 1890. 
July 1, 1888. 
October 1, 1889. 
October 1, 1890. 
July 1, 1888. 

Amount 



Number of Bonds. 



brought forward 
349 to 350 
448 to 449 
257 to 266 
351 to 352 
450 to 451 
353 to 355 
452 to 453 
30 to 31 
356 to 358 
454 to 455 
267 to 276 

291 
359 to 361 
456 to 457 

292 
362 to 364 
458 to 459 

293 
365 to 367 
423 to 424 

294 
368 to 370 
426 to 427 

295 

371 to 373 

428 to 429 

296 

carried forward 



Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 



4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
5i 
, 4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



When Due. 



Oct. 1, 1903, 
Oct. 1, 1903, 
July 1, 1904, 
Oct. 1, 1904. 
Oct. 1, 1904. 
Oct. 1, 1905. 
Oct. 1, 1905. 
July 1, 1906. 
Oct. 1, 1906. 
Oct. 1, 1906. 
July 1, 1907. 
July 1, 1907. 
Oct. 1, 1907. 
Oct. 1, 1907. 
July 1, 1908. 
Oct. 1, 1908. 
Oct. 1, 1908. 
July 1, 1909. 
Oct. 1, 1909. 
Oct. 1, 1909. 
July 1, 1910. 
Oct. ], 1910. 
Oct. 1, 1910. 
July 1, 1911. 
Oct. 1, 1911. 
Oct. 1, 1911. 
July 1, 1912. 



Denomi- 
nation. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
],000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



Amount. 



$253,500 
2,000 
2,000- 
10,000' 
2,000" 
2,000' 
3,000' 
2,000 
10,000 
3,000 
2,000 
10,000 
1,000 
3,000 
2,000 
1,000' 
3,000 
2,000 
1,000 
3,000 
2,000' 
1,000 
3,000" 
2,000- 
1,000 
3,000' 
2,000- 
1,000 
$332,500 



56 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE B. — WATER LOAN BONDS. 



Concluded. 



Date. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When Due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount, 


Amount 


brought forward 


. 


. . 


. 


$332,500 


October 1, 1889. 


374 to 376 


4 


Oct. 1, 1912. 


$1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890. 


430 to 431 


4 


Oct. 1, 1912. 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888. 


297 


4 


July 1, 1913. 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889. 


377 to 379 


4 


Oct. 1, 1913. 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890. 


432 to 433 


4 


Oct. 1, 1913. 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888. 


298 


4 


July 1, 1914. 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889. 


380 to 382 


4 


Oct. 1, 1914. 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1891. 


434 to 435 


4 


Oct. 1, 1914. 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888. 


299 


4 


July 1, 1915. 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889. 


383 to 384 


4 


Oct. 1, 1915. 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890. 


436 to 437 


4 


Oct. 1, 1915. 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888. 


300 


4 


July 1, 1916. 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889. 


385 to 386 


4 


Oct. 1, 1916. 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890. 


438 to 439 


4 


Oct. 1, 1916. 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888. 


301 


4 


July 1, 1917. 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889. 


387 to 388. 


4 


Oct. 1, 1917. 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890. 


440 to 441 


4 


Oct. 1, 1917. 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888. 


302 


4 


July 1, 1918. 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889. 


389 to 390 


4 


Oct. 1, 1918. 


1,000 


2,000 


•October 1, 1890. 


442 to 443 


4 


Oct. 1, 1918. 


1,000 


2,000 


•October 1, 1889. 


391 to 392 


4 


Oct. 1, 1919. 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890. 


444 to 445 


4 


Oct. 1, 1919. 


1,000 


2,000 


•October 1, 1890. 


446 to 447 


4 


Oct. 1, 1920. 


1,000 


2,000 


Total 


amount of Water 


Loan 


Bonds . . 


. . . 


$375,500 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



57 



TABLE B. — Continued. 
CITY LOAN PAVING BONDS. 



Date. 


Number of 


Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


October 1, 1892. 


1 


to 


5 


4 


Oct. 1, 1893. 


$1,000 


$5,000- 


October 1, 1892. 


6 


to 


10 


4 


Oct. 1, 1894. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


11 


to 


15 


4 


Oct. 1, 1895. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


16 


to 


20 


4 


Oct. 1, 1896. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


21 


to 


25 


4 


Oct. 1, 1897. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


26 


to 


30 


4 


Oct. ], 1898. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


31 


to 


35 


4 


Oct. 1, 1899. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


36 


to 


40 


4 


Oct. 1, 1900. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


41 


to 


45 


4 


Oct. 1, 1901. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


46 


to 


50 


4 


Oct. 1, 1902. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


51 


to 


55 


4 


Oct. 1, 1903. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


56 


to 


60 


4 


Oct. 1, 1904. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


61 


to 


65 


4 


Oct. 1, 1905. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


66 


to 


70 


4 


Oct. 1, 1906. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


71 


to 


75 


4 


Oct. 1, 1907. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


76 


to 


80 


4 


Oct. 1, 1908. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


81 


to 


85 


4 


Oct. 1, 1909. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


86 


to 


90 


4 


Oct. 1, 1910. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


91 


to 


95 


4 


Oct. 1, 1911. 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892. 


96 


to 


100 


4 


Oct. 1, 1912. 


1,000 


5,000 


Total 


amount of Paving 


Bonds 






$100,000 











RECAPITULATION. 



City Loan Bonds 
Sewer Loan Bonds 
Water Loan Bonds 
City Loan Paving Bonds 



Total amount of funded debt 



$631,000 

35,000 

375,500 

100,000 

$1,141,500 



58 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE C. 

STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS SHOWING APPROPRIA- 
TIONS, EXPENDITURES, ETC., TO DEC. 31, 1892. 



Credit. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 

Taxes, amount assessed 
Property and debt balance 



Debit. 

Eire Department . . . . $37,000 00 

Health Department .... 8,000 00 

Highways 55,000 00 

Highways, paving Union square and 

parts of Somerville and Webster 

avenues 100,000 00 

Indigent Soldiers and Sailors . . 500 00 

Interest 57,000 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . . 5,000 00 

Nathan Tufts Park .... 25,000 00 

Police 24,000 00 

Police Station Incidentals . . . 3,500 00 

Public Library 4,000 00 

Public Grounds . . . . . 4,300 00 

Printing and Stationery . . . 6,300 00 

Reduction of Funded Debt . . . 60,000 00 

Renewals of Funded Debt . . . 28,000 00 
Relief and Burial of Indigent Soldiers 

and Sailors .... 3,000 00 

Salaries ...... 31,085 00 

School Teachers' Salaries . . . 108,000 00 

School Contingent .... 13,000 00 

School Contingent, Janitors' Salaries . 10,000 00 

School Fuel 7,150 00 



$512,835 00 
181,000 00 

$693,835 00 



Amounts carried forward 



$589,835 00 $693,835 00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



59' 



Amounts brought forward 
Schoolhouse Incidentals 
Schoolhouse, Edgerly addition 
Sewers . 
Sidewalks 
Street Lights 
Support of Poor 
Watering Streets 



$589,835 00 
10,000 00 
20,000 00 
18,000 00 
10,000 00 
27,000 00 
14,000 00 
5,000 00 



$693,835 OO 



$693,835 00 



BROADWAY PARKWAY. 



Credit. 



Overlay and Abatement, amount transferred . 
Highland Schoolhouse addition, amount transferred . 
Schoolhouse in Ward Three, amount transferred 
Cash, received of West End Street 

Railway . . . . $247 95 

Mike Finnon, pay roll account . 4 00 



Debit. 




Cash, paid laborers 


$788 50 


Highways account, laborers 


250 40 


Christopher Burke, teaming, etc 


2,337 08 


Jeremiah McCarthy, edgestones 


1,053 41 


Thomas Casey, loam 


584 78 


Jonathan Brown, loam 


25 02 


Heirs of Edwin Sawyer, loam 


103 63 


Jonathan Stone, loam 


88 55 


George McKenna, teaming 


17 50 


John R. Farnham, trees 


49 00 


Willard Ladd, trees . 


18 00 


A. Parker, stone posts 


90 00 


Portland Stone Ware Co., pipe 


2 64 


Ames Plow Co., wire 


18 86 


J. E. Herrick, cement 


3 90 


Amounts carried forward . 


$5,431 17 



$4,500 00 

23 41 

773 8r 



251 95 



$5,549 23- 



$5,549 23 



60 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
I. H. Brown & Co., lumber 
David W. Lewis, grate and bar, 
Parker & Wood, seed 
Bradley Fertilizer Co., fertilizer, 
Sewers account, catch-basin 



Excess and Deficiency, balance 
to credit of account 



$5,431 17 


8 


37 


6 


00 


16 


00 


25 


00 


58 


53 



$5,549 23 



$5,545 17 



4 06 



$5,549 23 



CASH. 



Credit. 



Broadway Parkway 

County of Middlesex . 

Fire Department 

Funded Debt 

Health Department 

Highways 

Highways, paving Union square and 

parts of Somerville and Webster 

avenues 
Indigent Soldiers and Sailors 
Interest .... 
Maverick National Bank 
Miscellaneous 
Nathan Tufts Park 
Overlay and Abatement 
Police ..... 
Police Station Incidentals 
Printing and Stationery 
Public Grounds 
Public Library 
Relief and Burial Indigent Soldiers and 

Sailors .... 
Salaries ..... 

Amount carried forward . 



$5,545 17 

30,657 03 

40,991 94 

132,000 00 

11,816 76 

58,863 29 



96,249 77 
1,174 00 

42,974 26 
135,246 44 

17,125 85 

21,761 95 
140 00 

42,989 21 
3,775 68 
6,853 46 
6,259 60 
5,800 93 

4,029 92 
31,458 12 

$695,713 38 



Al^PENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



61 



Amount brought forward . 
School Teachers' Salaries 
School Contingent 
School Contingent, Janitors' Salaries 
School Fuel ..... 
Schoolhouse Incidentals 
Schoolhouse in Ward Two . 
Schoolhouse in Ward Two, Prospect 

Hill District 
Schoolhouse, Edgerly addition 
Semi-Centennial Celebration 
Sewers . . . .' 

Sidewalks .... 
State Aid .... 
State of Massachusetts 
State of Massachusetts, Metropolitan 

Sewer 
Street Lights 
Sundry Persons . 
Support of Poor . 
Temporary Loans 
Watering Streets . 
Water Loan Interest 
Water Maintenance 
Water Services 
Water-works Extension 
Balance to debit in account 1893 



$695,713 38 

108,058 81 

13,196 81 

9,794 92 

7,147 68 

17,734 18 

600 00 

260 88 

11,217 50 

5,535 11 

24,237 15 

20,880 57 

6,804 50 

27,457 50 

3,136 02 
26,529 45 
127 50 
17,015 30 
463,000 00 
12,828 06 
15,415 00 
30,689 87 

9,794 86 
37,124 64 
39,653 03 



$1,603,952 72 



Debit. 



Balance from 1891 
Broadway Parkway 
City of Boston, water rates 
Pire Department . 
Funded Debt 
Health Department 



$37,007 03 

251 95 

77,640 91 

194 73 

228,000 00 
263 00 



Amounts carried forward . 



$343,357 62 $1,603,952 72 



62 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . 
Highways ...... 

Highways, paving Union square and 

parts of Somerville and Webster 

avenues . . . . . 
Interest 

Maverick National Bank 
Miscellaneous 
Nathan Tufts Park 
Overlay and Abatement 
Police . 

Police Station Incidentals 
Printing and Stationery 
Public Grounds . 
Public Library 
Reduction of Funded Debt 
Salaries 

School Contingent 
Schoolhouse Incidentals 
Sewers .... 
Sewer Assessments 
Sidewalks 

Sidewalk Assessments . 
State Aid 
State of Massachusetts, Indigent 

Soldiers and Sailors 
State of Massachusetts, State Aid 
Support of Poor . 
Taxes . 

Temporary Loans 
Watering Streets . 
Water Maintenance 
Water Services 
Water Service Assessments 
Water-works Extension 



^343,357 


62 $1,603,952 72 


4,199 


70 


351 


86 


10,013 


46 


35,246 44 


3,826 


85 


170 


50 


5 


94 


19,321 


97 


430 


00 


8 


25 


567 


12 


1,462 


01 


77,185 00 


6 


92 


65 


00 


2,477 


07 


656 


54 


11,715 43 


617 


54 


8,233 47 


33 


50 


432 


50 


5,581 


50 


3,099 


90 


598,754 


36 


453,000 


00 


7,984 


77 


1,414 


08 


377 


45 


11,094 


50 


2,261 


47 




Sl,603,952 72 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT, 63 

CITY OF BOSTON, WATER RATES. 

Credit. 

Cash, received of City of Boston, return on water 

rates $77,640 91 

Debit. 
Water Maintenance .... f 20,000 00 
Water-works Extension . . . 40,000 00 

Water Loan Interest .... 15,895 00 
Reduction of Funded Debt, water 

bonds . . . . . 1,745 91 

$77,640 91 



EXCESS AND DEFICIENCY. 

Credit. 

Broadway Parkway, credit balance of 
account ..... 
Highways, credit balance of account .. 
Interest, credit balance of account 


$4 06 

336 41 

11,604 20 



CITY LOAN BONDS. 

Credit. 

Balance to debit in account 1893 . .... $53,000 00 

Debit. 
Funded Debt, bonds not sold . . . . . $53,000 00 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 

Credit. 
Taxes, amount assessed . . .... $30,657 03 

Debit. 
Cash, paid county tax . . . .... $30,657 03 



Amount carried forward . . $11,944 67 



$11,944 67 


332 76 


154 


32 


7 


52 


205 


08 


2 


32 


470 


55 



64 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward . 

Police, credit balance of account . 

Police Station Incidentals, credit bal- 
ance of account 

Public Grounds, credit balance of ac- 
count . . . . . 

School Contingent, Janitors' Salaries, 
credit balance of account 

School Fuel, credit balance of account, 

Street Lights, credit balance of account, 

Support of Poor, credit balance of 

account . . . . 84 60 

Watering Streets, credit balance of 
account .... 

Overlay and Abatement, transferred . 

Debit. 

Fire Department, debit balance of 
account .... 

Health Department, debit balance of 
account .... 

Indigent Soldiers and Sailors, debit 
balance of account 

Miscellaneous, debit balance of ac- 
count ..... 

Printing and Stationery, debit balance 
of account .... 

Relief and Burial of Indigent Soldiers 
and Sailors, debit balance of 
account .... 

Salaries, debit balance of account 

School Teachers' Salaries, debit bal- 
ance of account 

School Contingent, debit balance of 
account .... 

Schoolhouse Incidentals, debit balance 
of account .... 

Sidewalks, debit balance of account 



356 


71 




4,323 


99 


$17,882 52 






$3,797 


21 


' 


3,553 


76 




87 


00 




4,599 


00 




545 


21 




942 


42 




366 


20 




58 


81 




131 


81 




3,757 


11 




43 


99 


$17,882 52 







APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 65 

FIRE DEPARTMENT, ENGINE HOUSE, EAST SOMERVILLE. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, Funded Debt account . . . . $6,500 00 

Debit. 
Property and debt balance $6,500 00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed . . . . $37,000 00 
Cash, received of E. I. Braddock & Co., 

old zinc, copper, etc. . . $125 73 
Frank W. Leavitt, old hose car- 
riage ..... 15 00 
Lorenzo W. Dow, manure . 54 00 

194 73 



Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit of 

account . 3,797 21 



$40,991 94 



Debit. 




Cash, paid James R. Hopkins, chief en- 




gineer . . . . 


$1,400 00 


Nathaniel C. Barker, assistant 




engineer .... 


500 00 


Two steamer engineers 


2,280 00 ■ 


Two assistant engineers 


2,000 00 


Nine drivers . . . . 


9,000 00 


Benjamin W. Daley, substitute 




driver ..... 


32 03 


Frank L. Draper, substitute 




driver 


114 16 


Richard F. Clarkson, substitute 




driver ..... 


127 24 


Oscar Sheltus, substitute driver. 


188 78 


Amounts carried forward . 


$15,642 21 $40,991 94 



66 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward 

Charles H. Bridges, substitute 
driver ..... 

Edgar F. Shaw, substitute driver, 

Frank Hersey, substitute driver, 

Arthur Merrill, special service, 

Edward O. Webber, special ser- 
vice ..... 

Edward Poor, special service 

Fred B. Clapp, special service . 

Arthur C. Sellon, special service, 

Walter N. Milliman, special ser- 
vice ..... 

Lorenzo H. Dale, special service, 

Henry J. Turner, special service, 

William G. Johnson, special ser- 
vice . . . . . 3 00 

Bernard C. Phillips, special ser- 
vice ..... 

Ira A. Mix, special service 

Frederick Di Beck, special ser- 
vice 

John Ford, special service 

Merrill N. Bent, special service, 

John A. Quinn, special service, 

James Singleton, special service, 

John A. Shannon, special service, 

Alfred Pv. Higgins, special ser- 
vice . . ... 2 50 

Thomas W. Joy, special service, 2 50 

James D. Perkins, Jr., special 
service ..... 

Edwin H. Bright, special service, 

Steamer Company No. 1, call- 
men . . . 

Steamer Company No. 4, call- 
men . . . . , 

Amounts carried forward . . 



$15,642 21 


$40,991 94 


97 21 




262 14 




182 48 




3 00 




3 00 




3 00 




3 00 




3 00 




3 00 




3 00 




2 50 





3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 



2 50 




7 50 




1,242 00 




1,202 00 




$18,693 54 


$40,991 94 



$18,693 54 


$40,991 94 


1,022 00 




1,092 00 




1,022 00 




992 00 




1,742 00 




981 25 





APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 67 

Amounts brought J orward 

Hose Company No. 1, callmen 

Hose Company No. 2, callmen 

Hose Company No. 3, callmen 

Hose Company No. 5, callmen 

Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 
callmen .... 

Edward F. Backus, lineman 

James R. Hopkins, disburse- 
ments 32 00 

R. W. Willey & Co., hay and 

grain 982 26 

Leavitt, Sanborn, & Co., hay and 
grain ..... 

A. M. Prescott, hay and grain . 

Nathan Tufts & Sons, hay and 
grain . . 

Fulton O'Brion, hay and grain . 

E. B. Vreeland, hay and grain . 

A. J. Sawyer & Co., hay and grain, 

G. W. Ladd, hay and grain 

C. W. Ingalls, horseshoeing 

Seward Dodge, horseshoeing 

Charles F. Scott, horseshoeing . 

Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing . 

Thomas F. Culliton, horseshoe- 
ing 

W. H. Richardson, horseshoeing, 

Charles Maguire, horseshoeing . 

Charles L. Underbill, black- 
smithing . . . . 10 05 

E. Teel & Co., hose wagon and 

repairing apparatus, etc. . 775 50 

Frank W. Leavitt, repairing ap- 
paratus, etc. .... 122 00 

Charles Waugh & Co., repairing 

apparatus, etc. . . , 205 77 



424 


89 


412 


98 


164 


20 


160 


55 


91 


85 


47 


62 


16 


10 


97 


75 


94 


96 


83 


62 


61 


54 


46 


90 


46 


40 


24 


10 



Amounts carried forward . . $29,445 83 $40,991 94 



68 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
Jacob Woodbury, repairing ap- 
paratus, etc. . . . . 
H. D. Brown, repairing appara- 
tus, etc 

D. J. Bennett, harness work 

F. Ivers & Son, harness work, 
etc. .... 

E. Spalding, harness work 
Hill & Langtry, harness work 
Dodge, Haley, & Co., harness 

work . . . . 
Charles E. Berry, harness work 

etc. .... 

J. B. Dupont, hardware 
W. E. Plumer. hardware 
Richard Dowd, hardware . 
W. I. Heald, hardware 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
Howe & Flint, hardware . 
David W. Crocker, hardware 
J. A. Durell, hardware 

F. C. Fuller & Son, hardware 
I. H. Brown, carpentering 

G. D. B. Robinson, carpenter 
ing .... 

Elijah Walker, carpentering 
Thomas Gordan, carpentering 
Arthur W. Berry, carpentering 
Mclntire & Holland, carpenter 

ing .... 

John R. Thompson, carpentering 
N. C. Barker, carpentering 
W. S. Walker, carpentering 
James F. Davlin, plumbing 
Young & Maynard, plumbing 
H. W. Covell, plumbing 

Amounts carried forward . 



$29,445 83 


$40,991 94 


10 85 




2 75 




80 95 




101 80 




16 25 




44 71 





2 70 



62 


50 


50 


90 


68 


54 , 


44 


03 


18 


49 


37 


72 


18 


02 


11 


80 


3 


79 


9 


63 


50 


88 


347 


97 


146 


79 


31 


56 


20 


60 


18 


67 


7 


48 


11 


25, 


2 


50 


47 


33 


39 


37 


17 


87 


. $30,773 


53 $40,991 94 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



69 



Amounts brought forward 


. $30,773 


53 $40,991 94 


C. W. Cahaian, plumbing . 




75 


W. J. Logan, painting 


100 


65 


J. H. Hollis, painting 


46 


50 


J. Q. Twombly, painting . 


15 


60 


J. F. Burton, painting 


16 


30 


A. Fisher, painting . 


2 


00 


John H. Stevens, lumber . 


9 


05 


Star Brass Manfg. Co., repairing 






gauge .... 


\ 9 40 


C. W. Adams, repairs 


15 


00 


Duncan C. Greene, repairs 




40 


Eastern Electrical Supply Co. 






supplies 


34 


83 


N. E. Gamewell Co., electrica 






supplies 


642 


21 


Electrical Safety Co., electrica 






supplies 


48 


18 


Charles Bly, electrical supplies 


31 


33 


Cochran Chemical Co., electri 






cal supplies . 


4 75 


John L. Crafts, repairs 


35 


35 


James Bartley, supplies 


17 


41 


H. W. Burgess, supplies . 


9 


63 


Boston Belting Co., hose . 


900 


00 


Boston Woven Hose & Rubber 






Co., hose and repairs 


458 


00 


Revere Rubber Co., hose . 


146 


35 


Harry Hunt, repairing hose 


12 


50 


Cornelius Callahan Co., hose. 






etc. . . . . . 


402 


95 


J. A. & W. Bird & Co., vitriol . 


68 


25 


Pettengill, Andrews Co., vitriol, 


55 


04 


A. S. Jackson, ladders, etc. 


233 


18 


McDormand, Warner, & Co., 






ladders . . . . . 


22 


50 


Fuller, Dana, & Fitz, wire 


55 


30 


Amounts carried forward . 


$34,166 94 $40,991 94 



70 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 

Ira C. Hersey, assignee, bell 

spring .... 
Chapman Valve Manfg Co., tools 
Horace E. Walker Manfg. Co. 

pipe .... 
American Fire Engine Co., gong 
H. W. Johns Manfg. Co., paint 
Boston Nickel Plating Co., ex 

tinguishers 
H. C. Howes, buckles 
James Forgie & Son, brushes 
Lappen Bros., sponges 
Charles W. Badger, sponges 
Thomas Hollis, soap, etc. 
John G. Lesure, drugs 
George H. Cowdin, drugs 
E. F. Chaffee, drugs 
Charles R. Simpson, veterinary 

services .... 
H. B. Welles, veterinary services 
John P. Squire & Co., oil . 
Charles L. Davenport, salt 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., chairs 
George F. Roach, wardrobe 
Jordan, Marsh, & Co., bedding 
S. L. Chandler, bedding . 
Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel 
B. F. Wild & Co., fuel 
George M. Winslow & Co., fuel 
J. J. Underhill, fuel . 
James M. Burckes & Son, mason 

work .... 
Scoville Manfg. Co., buttons 
J. E. Marshall, insignia 
A. W. Mitchell Manfg. Co. 

badges .... 



$34,166 94 $40,991^94 

1 21 

4 50 

8 85 
18 10 
13 76 

4 00 
6 00 

4 00 

5 35 
1 22 

59 65 
12 00 

6 05 
75 

24 50 
34 00 
37 70 

* 3 00 
45 75 
22 50 
43 70 

25 60 
544 82 
177 50 
143 10 

4 75 • 

156 25 

9 61 
43 25 

58 21 



Amoujits carried forward 



$35,686 62 $40,991 94 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



71 



Amounts brought forward 
Silsby Manfg. Co., freight 
New England Telephone and 

Telegraph Co., rentals and 

tolls . , . 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
Charlestown Gas Co., gas . 
City of Boston, water for 

hydrants 
City of Boston, water for houses 
Loring & Phipps, plans 
H. D. & W. S. Durgin, ice 
Boston Ice Co., ice . 
Union Glass Co., jars 
Samuel Barker, shades 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 
Citizen Publishing Co., printing 
Somerville Electric Light Co. 

labor .... 
Ray's Laundry, washing 
Mrs. Calvert, washing 
Samuel H. Stevens, washing 
A. Sellon, washing 
Irving C. Jackson, washing 
Fred A. Blackburn, labor . 
George L. Blackbird, labor, 
Samuel E. Coombs, labor . 
William E. Peirce, labor . 
Joseph A. Sanders, labor . 
James I. King, labor 
Albert F. Jones, labor 
Danforth S. Steele, labor . 
Jairus Mann, travelling expenses 

special committee . 
J. H. Thompson, carriage hire 
Howard Lowell, carriage hire 
S. J. Wood, filing saws, etc. 



$35,686 62 
41 25 



129 30 
495 84 
161 11 

3,220 00 

130 00 
120 00 

37 50 
12 00 

4 35 
8 25 

12 75 
4 00 

4 00 

74 09 
23 13 

13 88 
10 00 

6 37 

131 00 
59 00 
74 00 

38 50 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 

2 00 

30 41 
17 50 

5 00 

3 55 



,991 94 



Amounts carried forward . 



$40,561 40 $40,991 94 



72 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward 
T. E. Edwards, repairing lock, 
W. A. Greenough, directory 
Boston City Hospital, medical 
attendance . . . . 
Charles E. Farnham, expressing, 

E. R. Perham, expressing . 
Barker & Tibbetts, expressing, 
Oilman's Express, expressing 
Thorpe's Express, expressing 
Glines & Co., expressing . 
George Morton, expressing 

F. D. Woodbridge, expressing . 
Charles A. Holmes, repairing 

pipe ..... 4 25 

William A. Folsom & Co., steam 
fitting ..... 

Boston Bolt Co., iron work 

Parker & Wood, tools 

John S. Cleary, conductor 

F. H. Flagg, wheelwright work, 

Thomas Dowd, plastering 

W. W. White & Co., maps 

Somerville Journal Co., printing, 

E. W. Ring, washing . 

J. P. Routh, drugs . . 

William Eccles & Son, cleaning 

carpets . . . . . 2 60 

William F. Lowe, washing pow- 
der 22 60 

J. A. Litchfield, soap . . 4 50 

James C. Fitzgerald, use of team, 3 00 

Arthur T. Hatch, premium of 

insurance .... 75 00 

Smith & Robertson, premium of 

insurance .... 66 25 



$40,561 40 


$40,991 94 


1 00 




2 00 




38 00 




25 85 




23 20 




1 30 




15 




2 20 




80 




3 00 


. 


2 88 





69 


64 


9 


60 


2 


50 


4 


14 


11 


75 


11 


75 


11 


70 


37 


00 


3 


38 




50 



$40,991 94 



. APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 73 

FUNDED DEBT. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1892 ^1,045,500 00 

Cash, received from sale of City Loan 

Paving Bonds Nos. 1 to 100, $100,000 00 
Water Loan Bonds Nos. 448 to 

475 28,000 00 

City Loan Bonds, bonds not 

sold 53,000 00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1,224 to 
1,323 100,000 00 



281,000 00 
$1,326,500 00 



Debit. 
Cash, paid sundry persons : — 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 66 to 

76 $11,000 00 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 78 to 

88 . . . . . . 11,000 00 

Water Loan Bond No. 281 . 1,000 00 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 309 to 

311 3,000 00 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 395 to 

,396 2,000 00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 721 to 

798 78,000 00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 924 to 

928 ..... 5,000 00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1,013 to 

1,022 10,000 00 

City Loan Bonds No. 1,107 to 

1,110 4,000 00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1,147 to 

1,153 . . ... 7,000 00 



$132,000 00 
Balance to debit in account 1893, 1,194,500 00 

$1,326,500 00 



74 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



Credit. 



Appropriations, amount assessed 
Cash, received of W. P. Mitchell, per. 

mits to keep swine and goats 

and collect grease . 
Martin Gill, rent of land . 
Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit 

of account .... 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Caleb A. Page, salary as in 

spector . 
Disbursements . 
Henry Gray, collecting offal 
Martin Gill, collecting offal 
Jeremiah McCarthy, collecting 

ashes .... 
John F. Elkins, collecting ashes 
A. M. Prescott, collecting ashes 

and offal 
Henry Gray, wagons and shed 
Christopher Burke, wagon 
T. M. Drown, professional ser 

vices . . . . , 
W. French Smith, chemical an 

alysis .... 
Thomas N. Hart, rent of P. O 

box .... 

A. M. Dennett, nursing 
H, S. Pond, rent of land . 
N. C. Barker, use of team . 
Brown & Smith, carriage hire 
L. H. Brown, carriage hire 

Amounts carried forward . 



. 


$8,000 00 


^213 00 




50 00 




3,553 76 






8 816 76 




o. \j J. V % \y 




$11,816 7a 


$1,100 00 




86 05 




1,000 10 




3,248 98 




2,249 50 




2,150 00 




34 50 




550 00 




65 00 





500 00 



8 00 



4 00 




15 00 




50 00 




1 00 




2 50 




29 50 




$11,044 13 


$11,816 76 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



75 



Amounts brought forward 


$11,044 13 f 11,816 76 


William J. Blaisdell, painting 




wagons ..... 


72 00 


Seward Dodge, repairing wagons, 


85 17 


L. A. Wright, repairing wagons, 


3 60 


Howe & Flint, hardware . 


3 30 


Whitney & Snow, hardware 


4 45 


The Heliotype Printing Co., 




maps ..... 


37 50 


Somerville Journal Co., adver- 




tising ..... 


89 55 


Citizen Publishing Co., adver- 




tising 


34 25 


Thomas Groom & Co., stationery. 


113 00 


William T. Sedgwick, writing 


2 25 


Edith Johnson, writing 


1 50 


J. F. Wellington, disbursements. 


2 50 


Hopkinson & Harden, buckets. 




etc. ..... 


4 50 


N. E. Vaccine Co., virus . 


14 99 


G. H. Cowdin, peppermint tubes, 


7 14 


West & Jenny, sulphur 


8 13 


Charles H. Crane, sulphur 


1 40 


John Welch, compensation for 




damages .... 


5 00 


C. A. Southwick, labor 


64 25 


J. D. Perkins, labor . . 


2 50 


Thomas M. McFarland, labor , 


1 00 


John O'Brien, labor . 


4 00 


William F. Walker, labor . 


56 25 


Daniel Merrill, labor 


21 00 


Sundry persons, burying ani- 




mals ..... 


102 50 


Charles E. Farnham, expressing. 


90 


Laborers, pay roll . . 


30 00 




$11,816 76 



76 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



HIGHWAYS. 



Credit. 



Appropriations, amount assessed 
Cash, received of H. W. P. Colson, side 
walk .... 
John H. Stevens, sidewalk 
Ceylon Hoyt, sidewalk 
Charles F. Swan, sidewalk 
David A. Gregg, sidewalk . 
Hiram R. Mills, sidewalk 
Jonathan Stone, sidewalk 
Edward S. Sparrow, sidewalk 
Ormand H. Fuller, sidewalk 
Charles H. Lockhart, sidewalk 
A. W. Follett, sidewalk 
Annie Elston, sidewalk 
James A. Strout, sidewalk 
Matthew Carley, sidewalk 
Edward B. Morgan, sidewalk 
Augusta M. Stilphen, sidewalk 
J. Frank Wellington, sidewalk 
Mary T. Graham, sidewalk 
Marilla J. Butler, sidewalk 
Henry Donaghey, sidewalk 
George H. Derby, driveway 
William M. Hanson, driveway 
Daniel J. Buckley, driveway 
George E. Newcomb, driveway 
William J. McLean, driveway 
S. Armstrong & Co., driveway 
Kerr Chemical Co., driveway 
Father O'Brien, driveway . 
Thomas Ormand, rent 
Arthur Murley, rent . 
John P. Squire & Co., labor 

Amounts carried forward , 



. 


$55,000 00 


$127 


63 


36 


92 


47 20 


21 


07 


48 41 


. 24 60 


. 48 


51 


96 


30 


33 


58 


44 21 


77 


14 


21 


07 


. 21 


07 


19 57 


104 


12 


15 


87 


12 


00 


45 


15 


68 


00 


24 


00 


30 


50 


11 


53 


7 


38 


4 


25 


2 


00 


42 


06 


25 


05 


24 


88 


72 00 


96 


00 


55 


23 


$1,307 30 $55,000 00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



77 



Amounts brought forward 


$1,307 30 


$55,000 00 


N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 






Co., labor .... 


6 75 




Thomas H. Eames, old iron 


2 50 




North Packing & Provision Co., 






use of road roller . 


18 00 




A. J. Herrick, horse . 


50 00 




Christopher Burke, horses 


100 00 




Welch & Hall, horses 


145 00 




Broadway Parkway account, 






labor and materials 


250 40 




Sidewalks account, use of teams, 






labor, and materials . " 


2,045 15 




Watering Streets account, pav- 






ing 


218 50 




Schoolhouse Incidentals ac- 






count, labor and teaming 


56 10 








4,199 70 








$59,199 70 


Debit. 






Cash, paid laborers .... 


f 29,762 90 




Thomas H. Eames, salary as 






superintendent 


1,600 00 




Thomas H. Eames, board of 






horses ..... 


418 31 




R. W. Willey & Co., hay and 






grain . . . . 


1,751 43 




G. W. Ladd, hay and grain 


1,905 64 




Fitch & Ladd, hay and grain 


525 56 




Fulton O'Brion, hay and grain, 


314 88 




A. Clement, horseshoeing . 


212 74 




Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing . 


213 40 




Seward Dodge, horseshoeing 


167 72 




Charles S. Scott, horseshoeing, 


144 02 




G. W. Ingalls, horseshoeing 


4 08 




J. B. Ruffer, horseshoeing 


8 20 




Amounts carried forward . 


$37,028 88 


$59,199 70 



78 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
John Kellogg, horseshoeing 
F. DoOris, blacksmithing . 
Charles L. Underhill, black- 
smithing . . . . 
David W. Crocker, repairing 
carts . . . . . 
F. H. Flagg, repairing carts 
Miller & Shaw, repairing roller, 
George Tyler & Co., repairing 

roller 
William Campbell & Co., repair- 
ing roller 

D. J. Bennett, harness work 

E. Spalding, harness work 
T. L. Barrican, harness work 
W. H. Bustin & Son, harness 

work .... 
L. Barrican, harness work 
Hill & Langtry, harness work 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
W. I. Heald, hardware 
J. A. Durell, hardware 

F. C. Fuller & Son, hardware 
Howe & Flint, hardware , 
W. L. Snow, hardware 
Dupont & Cote, hardware 
Perrin, Seamans, & Co., hard 

ware .... 
C. W. H. Moulton & Co., hard 

ware .... 
Wetherell Brothers, hardware 
Waldo Brothers, hardware 
L. A. Wright, repairing tools 
John Fuller, repairing tools 
Jonathan Stone, repairing tools 
F. J. Wood, repairing tools 

Amounts carried forward . 



$37,028 88 

8 23 

364 93 

45 20 

251 75 
19 05 
58 19 

39 00 



159,199 70 



8 


40 


445 


50 


32 


00 


15 


30 


7 


00 


1 


75 


72 00 


262 


21 


34 


03 


6 


90 


25 


64 


5 75 




20 




25 



118 46 



12 90 




10 20 




14 50 




44 60 




8 75 




4- 30 




75 




$38,946 62 


$59,199 70 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



79 



Amounts brought forward 
Sherburne & Co., waste 
Jeremiah McCarthy, stone 
Massachusetts Broken Stone Co 

stone 
Dennis Shea, stone . 
Frank W. Mead, stone 
James Hughes, stone 
Christopher Burke, stone 
West End Street Railway Co 
N. E. Fitz & Co., wharfage 
W. A. Sanborn, bricks 
John Thresher, bricks 
Christopher Burke, sand 
A. Allen, sand . 
H. Parker, circles 
J. F. Elkins, teaming 
Christopher Burke, teaming 
T. F. Crimmings, teaming 
George McKenna, teaming 
Frank Buttimer, teaming . 
Martin Gill, teaming 
Henry Gray, teaming 
John Ducey, teaming 
Owen Cunningham, teaming 
William Cunningham, teaming 
Thomas Allen, teaming 
George H. Sampson, powder 
Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel 
J. E. Herrick, lime . 
Walter Bates, concreting . 
H. W. Johns Man'f'g Co., paint 
George W. Morrill, painting, etc. 
David Young, repairing roof 
L. C. Seavey, repairing roof 
W. A. Snow& Co., fence . 
W. C. Smith, Agent, springs 



$38,946 62 

64 81 

2,956 45 

2,361 82 

1,022 35 

1,263 90 

393 60 

518 98 

439 02 

161 20 

216 80 

502 70 

205 40 

11 25 

98 00 

402 50 

262 50 

352 50 

586 50 

247 50 

320 00 

87 50 

52 50 

37 50 

15 00 

57 50 

136 45 

621 55 

167 30 

10 71 

63 13 

97 06 

5 96 

3 59 

115 38 

36 00 



159,199 70 



Amounts carried forward . . $52,841 53 $59,199 70 



80 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
Boston Belting Co., belting 
Frederick A. Chandler, carpen 

tering .... 
James F. Davlin, plumbing 
S. W, Fuller, lumber 
John F. Ayer & Co., lumber 
F. C. Ayer, Agent, lumber 
William H. Wood & Co., lumber 
Ames Plow Co., drag 
Abbot Downing Co., street 

sweeper 
Isburgh & Co., buggy 
J. L. & H. K. Potter, watering 

cart .... 
Welch & Hall, horses 
P. H. Dardis, horses 
A. J. Herrick, veterinary services 
Thomas Hollis, drugs 
Hosmer, Robinson, & Co., grain 
Samuel Walker Oil Co., oil 
Adams & Harrington, oil . 
Somerville Journal Co., printing, 
Citizen Publishing Co., printing, 
McDonnell Brothers, printing . 
Charles C. Stearns & Son, street 

signs ..... 
John Stutson, street signs 
Heirs of Mark Fiske, filling 
Jeremiah McCarthy, teaming 
N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., rentals and tolls 
L. H. Brown, carriage hire 
Horatio Gore & Co., labor 
Town of Medford, half cost of 

maintaining Middlesex-avenue 

bridge 



$52,841 53 

5 25 

162 08 

424 98 

148 44 

12 02 

90 53 

15 00 

6 32 

35 00 
140 00 

400 00 

1,575 00 

500 00 

300 75 

6 00 

87 82 

65 37 

57 20 

67 25 

40 50 

42 30 

28 35 
17 85 
62 00 

107 50 

74 20 
6 00 

29 26 



604 29 



859,199 70 



Amounts carried forward . . $57,952 79 $59,199 70 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 81 

Amounts brought forward 
City of Waltham, taxes 
Town of Wakefield, taxes 
City of Boston, water 
Oilman's Express, expressing . 
E. R. Perham, expressing 
Munroe's Express, expressing . 
School Contingent account, 

rental of telephone 
Sidewalks account, labor, etc., 
Highways, Paving Union Square 

account, labor . . . 75 58 

Sidewalk Assessments account, 

sidewalks .... 78 86 

ThomasGroom& Co., stationery, 58 50 



$57,952 79 


$59,199 70 


131 75 




32 38 




113 60 




4 15 




5 25 




1 41 




3 00 




406 02 





$58,863 29 



Excess and Deficiency, balance 

to credit of account . . 336 41 



$59,199 70 



HIGHWAYS, PAVING UNION SQUARE AND PARTS OF 
SOMERVILLE AND WEBSTER AVENUES. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount appropriated by borrowing 





on funded debt account 


. 


$100,000 00 


Cash, 


, received of Jeremiah McCarthy, 








recutting flagging . 


$74 09 






Sidewalks account, edgestones . 


230 89 






Highways account, labor . 

Debit. 
paid laborers .... 


46 88 


351 86 




$1,513 88 


Cash, 


$100,351 86 




Rockport Granite Co., paving 


- 






blocks ..... 


56,115 50 






Horatio Gore & Co., contract 








work ..... 
Amounts carried forward . 


18,965 38 






$76,594 76 


$100,351 86 



82 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts Iwought forward 

William H. Gore & Co., contract 
work .... 

Jeremiah McCarthy, edgestones 

M. W. Sands, bricks . 

N. M. Cofran & Co., bricks 

A. Parker, circles 

Sidewalk account, circle 

Sewers account, labor 

Whitney & Snow, hardware 

E. D. Sawyer & Co., lumber 

A. M. Prescott, teaming 

Somerville Electric Light Co., 
moving poles 

Somerville Journal Co., adver- 
tising and printing 

Boston Herald Co., advertising, 

Globe Newspaper Co., advertis- 
ing 

West End Street Railway Co., 
wharfage .... 

Horace L. Eaton, disbursements, 

T. Edward Ames, disbursements, 

Balance to credit in account 
1893 



176,594 76 $100,351 



13,555 


74 


3,828 


64 


661 


05 


80 


00 


26 


04 


11 


52 


10 


44 


12 


00 


5 


51 


77 


50 



9 80 

96 05 
21 00 

47 60 



1,200 40 

7 75 

8 97 




$96,249 77 
4,102 09 


$100,351 86 





INDIGENT SOLDIERS AND SAILORS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed . . . . 

State of Massachusetts, indigent soldiers and sailors, 

one-half of amount paid in 1892 
Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit of account. 



Debit. 



Cash, paid sundry persons 



$500 00 



587 00' 
87 00 


$1,174 00 
$1,174 00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 83 



INTEREST. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed 
Cash, received on deposits in banks 

N. W. Harris & Co., premium 

on bonds 
Blake Brothers & Co., premium 

on bonds .... 

Brewster, Cobb, & Estabrook, 

premium on bonds 
Sundry persons, on taxes and 

assessments. 



Debit. 

Cash, paid on funded debt : — 

^570,000 one year at 4 per cent., $22,800 00 

$200,000 one year at 5 per cent., 10,000 00 

$32,800 00 

Less coupons unpaid . . 100 00 



. 


$57,000 00 


$682 78 




1,612 80 




75 20 




20 00 




7,622 68 


10 018 4fi 








$67,013 46 



$32,700 00 
Sundry persons, coupons unpaid, 100 00 



$32,800 00 



On temporary loans: — 
Somerville Hospital, on note of 

$13,000 nine months eight 

days at 4^ per cent. . . $451 75 

Nellie A. Hutchins, guardian, on 

note of $10,000 eleven months 

eighteen days at 4^ per cent., 435 00 

Nellie A. Hutchins, guardian, on 

note of $15,000 eleven months 

fourteen days at 4^ percent., 645 00 



Amounts carried Jorward . . $1,531 75 $67,013 46 



84 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . $1,53175 $67,013^4^ 

Nellie A. Hutchins, guardian, on 
note of $30,000 four months 
at 4>^ per cent. ... 450 00 

Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, on note of $100,000 
four months seven days at 
4}^ per cent 1,587 50 

Brewster, Cobb, & Estabrook, on 
note of $20,000 four months 
at 4>^ per cent. . . . 300 00 

Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, on note of $50,000 six 
months at 4^^ per cent. . 1,125 00 

Blake Brothers & Co., on note 
of $50,000 seven months at 
3>^ per cent 1,020 83 

Blake Brothers & Co., on note 
of $50,000 seven months at 
31^ per cent. . . . 1,020 84 

Blake Brothers & Co., on note 
of $25,000 seven months at 
31^ per cent. ... 510 41 

Blake Brothers & Co., on note 
of $25,000 seven months at 
Zy, per cent. ... 510 42 

Blake Brothers & Co., on note 
of $20,000 seven months at 
'6^2 percent. . . .408 33 

Blake Brothers & Co., on note 
of $55,000 seven months at 
3>^ per cent. . . . 1,122 92 

National Security Bank, over- 
drafts . . . . . 521 26 



$10,109 26 



Amount carried forward . .... $67,013 46 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



85 



Amount brought forward . 

On funded debt 

On temporary loans . 

Semi-Centennial Celebration, 
amount transferred 

Miscellaneous, amount trans- 
ferred .... 

Public Grounds, amount trans 
ferred .... 

Schoolhouse Incidentals, amount 
transferred 

Watering Streets, amount trans 
ferred .... 



Excess and Deficiency, balance 
to credit of account 



$67,013 46 



$32,800 00 
10,109 26 

$42,909 26 

5,700 00 

3,700 00 

1,400 00 

1,500 00 

200 00 

$55,409 26 

11,604 20 



$67,013 46 



MAVERICK NATIONAL BANK. 

Credit. 

Property and Debt Balance, amount of loan on 

funded debt account . . . . . 

Cash, received dividends . . . . . . 



Debit. 



Cash, amount on deposit 



$100,000 00 
35,246 44 

$135,246 44 
$135,246 44 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Credit. 



Appropriations, amount assessed 
Interest, amount transferred 



$5,000 00 
3,700 00 



Amount carried forward . 



$8,700 00 



SQ ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward . . . . . $8,700 00 

Cash, received of sundry persons, costs 

on taxes and assessments . . $2,343 25 

Sundry persons, liquor licenses . 22 00 

Sundry persons, licenses to ped- 
dle .... . . 50 00 

Thomas Cunningham, milk in- 
spector's fees . . . , 149 50 

Fulton O'Brion, public weigher's 
fees 4 70 

Somerville Light Infantry, use 

of rifle range .... 25 00 

Maverick National Bank, check 
No. 5,035 lost ... 32 00 

George I. Vincent, city clerk : — 
Recording mortgages,$398 75 
Marriage certificates, 265 50 • 
Licensing dogs . 266 40 

Junk licenses . . 90 00 
Liquor licenses . 22 00 

Auctioneers' licenses, 32 00 



Amusements 


23 00 


Fire-works 


64 00 


Billiards and pool 


22 00 


Intelligence offices . 


10 00 


Naturalization fees . 


1 50 


Copy of records 


5 25 



1,200 40 

3,826 85 

Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit of 

account 4,599 00 



Debit. 

Cash, paid F. A. Chandler, carpenter- 
ing $259 47 

J. H. Keenan, carpentering , 123 80 

Fuller & Mathews, carpentering, 79 09 



17,125 85 



Amounts carried forward . . $462 36 $17,125 85 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



87 



Amounts brought forward 
Gillis Brothers, carpentering 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
Howe & Flint, hardware . 
J. A. Durell, hardware 
Enoch Robinson, hardware 
W. E. Plumer, hardware 
F. C. Fuller & Son, hardware 
C. W. Cahalan, plumbing . 
Young and Maynard, plumbing 
James F. Davlin, plumbing 
J. Q. Twombly, painting . 
W. M. McCrillis, painting . 
C. H. Tufts, painting 
Wallburg & Woehrn, painting 
Robert Duddy, horsekeeping 
F. J. Stanley, horsekeeping 
Horace L. Eaton, horsekeeping 
Charles F. Scott, horseshoeing 
Seward Dodge, horseshoeing 
Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing 
Charles L. Underbill, black 

smithing 
F. Dooris, blacksmithing . 
L. A. Wright, blacksmithing 
Jacob Woodbury, blacksmithing 
E. Spalding, harness work 
Joseph A. Pearson, harness 

work .... 
J. A. McKine, harness work 
Charles A. Blethen, harness 

work .... 
Hill & Langtry, harness work 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., furni- 
ture . . . . 
Kilborn Whitman & Co., furni- 
ture . . . . . 



$462 36 
74 70 
58 27 
41 42 
15 39 

2 75 

3 11 
60 

12 18 

8 60 

3 25 
44 16 
23 50 

9 21 
10 96 

342 50 

405 00 

65 00 

32 50 

12 30 

4 00 

9 95 

3 00 

40 

2 50 

10 45 

43 45 
90 

5 10 
1 00 

18 75 

12 00 



$17,125 85 



Amounts carried forward . 



$1,739 26 $17,125 85 



88 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . $1,739 26 $17,125 85 

Wemyss Brothers & Co., furni- 
ture 79 88 

Derby & Kilmer Desk Co., 
furniture . . . . 97 25 

Jordan, Marsh, & Co., carpets . 225 12 

Sprague & Hathaway Co., glass, 17 25 

Hollander, Bradshaw, & Folsom, 

book stands .... 3 95 

Thomas O'Callaghan & Co., 

mats 10 00 

H. A. Click, repairing furniture, 2 00 

T. A. Lewers, repairing furni- 
ture 1 25 

William Eccles, repairing furni- 
ture ..... 

E. O. Arnold, cleaning carpets , 
Union Glass Co., globes . 
L. C. Field, brushes 
William B. Plympton, polish 
Kendall & Slade, lamps 
William H. Poole, gas fitting 
Ingalls & Kendricken, steam fit 

ting . . . . , 

Tobias & Wall, tool bag . 

Charles L. Bly, electrical sup- 

phes 15 48 

Bigelow& Dowse, engineers' sup- 
plies ..... 16 38 

Frost & Adams, engineers' sup- 
plies ..... 61 63 

F. E. Whitney, engineers' sup- 
plies .... 

JR.. W. Karnan, supplies 
M. L. Vinal, supplies 
James Bartley, supplies 
J. H. Brooks, supplies 

Amounts carried forward , 





50 


11 


45 


3 


00 


4 


50 


1 


10 


7 


25 


41 


41 


15 


60 


7 


00 



19 75 




3 12 




3 60 




6 45 




4 75 




$2,398 93 


$17,125 85 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 89 



Amounts brought forward 


$2,398 93 $17,125 85- 


J. A. Chabot, repairing safe lock, 


1 00 


Ira G. Hersey, ballot boxes 


55 88 


W. T. Butler, repairing ballot 




boxes . . 


4 22 


Pulsion Telephone Supply Co., 




horse ..... 


225 00 


R. Tyner & Co., repairing buggy. 


26 15 


D. P. Bucknam, mason work 


2 25 


I. H. Brown & Co., lumber 


23 80 


S. W. Fuller, lumber 


7 34 


City of Boston, water 


42 19 • 


Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas . 


61 60 


Somerville Electric Light Co., 




lighting ..... 


315 18 


N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 




Co., tolls, etc. 


218 05 


A. Colman, sealer of weights and 




measures . . , 


100 oo 


Charles A. Small, pound keeper. 


60 42 


S. J. Woods, fitting keys, etc. . 


19 30 


Mrs. J. C. Ellis, rent of polling 




place ..... 


40 00 


Philip Eberle, rent of polling 




place 


25 00 


Ward officers .... 


1,357 00 


Alice T. Sleeper, clerical ser- 




vices . . . 


85 00 


Alice T. Sleeper, car fares 


3 20 


Katherine W. Wood, clerical ser- 




vices . . . . 


125' 00 


Cora F. Lewis, clerical services. 


260 50 


Gertrude G. Kendall, clerical 




services .... 


175 50 


Addie A. Snow, clerical services, 


149 50 


Laura E. McBain, clerical ser- 




vices ..... 


142 00 



Amounts carried forward . . $5,924 01 $17,125 85 



so ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . $5,924 01 $17,125 85 

Mary E. French, clerical services, 76 50 

Clara B. Snow, clerical services, 46 50 

Gertrude Pierce, clerical ser- 
vices . . ... 30 00 

Belle Horrell, clerical services, 32 00 

Charles G. Brett, clerical ser- 
vices 42 00 

Frank E. Merrill, clerical ser- 
vices 54-00 

William P. Pitman, clerical ser- 
vices 42 00 

William P. Cheney, clerical ser- 
vices 73 00 

Frederick S. Haynes, clerical 
services ..... 

George Welsh, clerical services, 

Charles Delano, clerical ser- 
vices ..... 

J. R. Wyman, refreshments 

The Alhambra, refreshments 

Silas D. Carter, refreshments, 

Charles Rickenburg & Co., re- 
freshments .... 

S. S. Higgins, turkeys 

Prospect Hill Market, turkeys, 

W. O. Turner, turkeys 

Sheeran & Houley, turkeys 

W. P. Blanchard, turkeys . 

City of Lowell, support of 

truants 241 42 

Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, 25 per cent, of liquor 
licenses . . . . . 11 25 

Thomas N. Hart, rent of P. O. 

box 4 00 

J. A. McLane, posting . . 107 10 



72 


00 


44 


00 


32 


00 


200 


00 


82 


20 


15 


00 


4 


50 


106 


03 


87 


40 


61 


41 


37 


89 


2 


15 



Amounts carried forward . . $7,428 36 $17,125 85 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 91 

Amounts brought forward 

S. H. Libby, services as auc- 
tioneer ..... 

Charles B. Stevens, recording, 

Byron Boyd, abstracts 

John E. Higgins, abstracts ^ . 

Charles L. Ellis, deputy collector, 

J. Lincoln Collins, brass work, 

Harry Russ, crayon . 

Jairus Mann, watching 

M. A. Mann, laundrying . 

C. M. Blake, newspapers . 

Charles S. Robertson, rubber 
stamps, clerical services, etc., 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery, 

Belknap & Co., type . 

J. H. Colbath, ringing bell, etc., 

G. W. Littlefield, ringing bell 

William Gray, ringing bell . 

Asbury Strahan, ringing bell 

George W. Jacobs, ringing bell . 

F. H. Wentworth, ringing bell . 

Fred S. Young, ringing bell 

Thomas HoUis, drugs 

H. Parker, stone work 

Joseph J. Giles, premium of 
insurance, etc. 

Boston Herald Co., advertising, 

H. D. & W. S. Durgin, ice 

Albert B. Fales, expenses of 

special committee ... 43 51 

Selwyn Z. Bowman, disburse- 
ments ..... 

Jairus Mann, disbursements 

E. W. Bailey, disbursements 

F. W. D. Duncklee, disburse- 
ments . . . . . 

Amounts carried fo7-ward . 



t28 


36 $17,125 85 


8 


40 


29 


23 


19 


00 


1 


00 


675 


00 


45 


00 


40 


00 


52 


50 


21 


00 


6 


00 


51 


45 


4 


25 


6 


60 


17 


00 


6 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


2 


50 


4 


00 


261 


00 


37 


50 


35 


00 



216 69 




21 29 




41 21 




9 85 




$9,098 34 


$17,125 85 



92 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 


. $9,098 34 $17,125 85 


C. R. Hultsman, disbursements 


3 80 


Carl B. Harvey, disbursements 


4 90 


William G. Stearns, disburse 




ments . . . • 


6 40 


B. F. Wild & Co., fuel 


216 25 


Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel 


18 00 


A. M. Prescott, teaming 


43 75 


E. R. Perham, expressing . 


16 60 


Charles E. Farnham, express 


- 


ing 


11 80 


Thorpe's Express, expressing 


15 


Woodbridge & Co., expressing 


75 


Oilman's Express, expressing 


30 


Bancroft's Express, expressing 


35 


N. L. Pennock, labor 


12 00 


E. P. Cook, labor 


13 00 


C. F. Dawes, labor . 


6 00 


John O'Brien, labor . 


4 00 


John B. Miller, labor 


7 75 


D. R. Spike, labor . 


4 00 


John Battles, labor . 


5 00 


C. A. Southwick, labor 


30 80 


William Denton, labor 


6 00 


Patrick O'Brien, labor 


6 00 


Patrick O'Connell, labor . 


6 00 


A. Clark, labor 


5 00 


A. A. Lewis, labor 


11 50 


Martin Dassance, labor 


4 00 


B. F. Sheridan, labor 


16 00 


J. A. Taylor, labor 


7 00 


W. H. Young, labor . 


10 00 


James L. Whitaker, labor 


4 75, 


Mrs. Hartness, labor 


9 00 


George A. Page, labor 


15 00 


W. A. Snow & Co., drinking 




fountain . . . . 


325 00 


Amounts carried forward . 


$9,929 19 $17,125 85 



10 


00 


7 


50 


87 


25 


45 


25 


6 


25 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 93 

Amounts brought forward . $9,929 19 $17,125 85 

N. D. Jones & Co., drinking 

fountain .... 93 75 

Willard C. Kinsley Post, 139, 

G. A. R., contribution for 

observance of Memorial Day, 350 00 

Albert C. Aldrich, return of 

births ..... 
G. W. Bryant, return of births . 
William A. Bell, professional ser- 
vices and return of births 
John T. Couch, return of births, 
A. H. Carvill, return of births . 
Charles S. Cahill, return of 

births 4 50 

Alvah B. Dearborn, return of 

births 7 00 

Thomas M. Durell, return of 

births . . . . . 19 50 

A. Ward FoUett, return of 

births ..... 
John A. Gregg, return of births, 
R. L. Lane, return of births 
H. B. Mclntire, return of births, 
George W. Mills, return of 

births ..... 

F. W. Taylor, return of births . 

G. E. Hetherington, return of 
births 

W. H. Bailey, return of births . 
John M. Schroeder, return of 

births 118 20 

Arthur C. Sellon, return of 

births . . ... 44 20 

E. G. Wiswell, return of births . 40 60 

John W. Coveney, return of 

deaths 7 75 



5 


50 


7 


25 


5 


75 


3 


75 




50 


3 


00 


5 


25 


3 


50 



Amounts carried forward . . $10,805 44 $17,125 85 



94 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward 

William A. Flaherty, return of 
deaths ..... 

C. H Lockhart, return of deaths, 

E. H. Marsh, return of deaths . 

Alfred E. Mann, return of deaths, 

Horace D. Runey, return of 
deaths ..... 

P. H. Rafferty, return of deaths, 

Catherine Brooks, compensation 
for damages .... 

Alice F. Murphy, compensation 
for damages .... 

Mary Murphy, compensation for 

damages .... 175 00 

Joseph T. Washburn, compensa- 
tion for damages . . . 300 00 

N. & B. Klarfield, compensation 

for damages .... 100 00 

William M. Colby, compensation 

for damages .... 100 00 

A. M. Young, compensation for 

damages .... 53 25 

James J. Irving, compensation 

for damages .... 50 00 

Thomas H. Dolhenty, compen- 
sation for damages . . " 50 00 

William H. Blethen, compensa- 
tion for damages ... 45 00 

Fred W. Coles, compensation for 

damages .... 20 50 

George Mulliken, compensation 

for damages . . . . 3 00 

Baldwin's Cadet Band, semi- 
centennial celebration . . 344 00 

Boardman's Cadet Band, semi- 
centennial celebration . . 160 00 



L0,805 44 


$17,125 85- 


45 00 




12 25 




25 75 




18 00 ■ 




31 50 




17 75 




2,700 00 




150 00 





Amounts carried forward . . $15,206 44 $17,125 85 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



95 



Amounts brought forward 
Bedford Cadet Band, semi-cen- 
tennial celebration 
Carter's Cadet Band, semi-cen- 
tennial celebration 
Woburn Band, semi-centennial 
celebration . . . . 
Woburn Brass Band, semi-cen- 
tennial celebration 
Eighth Regiment Band, semi- 
centennial celebration . 
S. Henry Hadley, services, semi- 
centennial celebration . 
Mrs. W. C. Bailey, services, semi- 
centennial celebration . 
E. A. Binney, rent of land for 

grand stand . . . 
Loring & Pliipps, plans for grand 
stand . . . . . 
George M. Starbird, constructing 
grand stand . . . . 
Colonel William Beals, deco- 
rating . . . . . 
Co. M, Eighth Regiment, M. 
V. M., appropriation for re- 
freshments . . . . 
James R. Hopkins, for refresh- 
ments . . 
WiUiam Hall& Co., staff holders, 
J. Stewart & Co., printing 
M. B. McManus, typewriting 
E. A. Pinnock, typewriting 
L. H. Brown, carriage hire 
H. M. Weld, carriage hire 
Brown & Smith, carriage hire 
J. E. Herrick, band stand 



$15,206 


44 


$17,125 85 


50 


00 




210 


00 




99 


82 




97 


29 




100 


00 




65 


00 




15 


00 




65 


00 




55 


00 


* 


eoo 


67 




25 


00 





175 00 



125 


00 


I 


50 


3 


75 


4 


50 


2 


75 


94 


00 


14 


00 


12 


00 


104 


13 



il7,125 85 



96 * ANNUAL REPORTS. 

NATHAN TUFTS PARK. 

Credit. 

Appropriation, amount appropriated by borrowing on 

funded debt account 
Cash, received of Catherine Collins, 
old house . . . 
Bridget Connors, bricks 
William F. Emerson, wood 
Frank E. Chandler, grass . 

Debit. 

Cash, paid Heirs of Nathan Tufts, Sr., 

129,497 feet of land 
Christopher Burke, on account 

of contract for grading . 

Laborers .... 
I. H. Brown & Co., lumber 
F. C. Ayer, lumber . 
J. E. Herrick, door and window, 
J. Q. Twombly, painting . 
E. A. Pinnock, copying 

Balance to credit in account 1893, 



OVERLAY AND ABATEMENT. 

Credit. 
Balance from 1891 . . . . . . . $13,115^44 

Taxes, amount added by the assessors 
for convenience in apportion- 
ment, to be applied to abate- 
ment on taxes . . . $22,271 95 
Cash, taxes collected .... 6 94 

22,278 89 



. 


$25,000 OO 


$126 00 
25 00 




9 50 




10 00 


170 50 




XIV tJ\r 




$25,170 50' 


$19,424 55 




2,167 12 
142 58 




8 60 




4 63 




4 17 




3 50 




6 80 




$21,761 95 
3,408 55 


$25,170 50' 





Amount carried forward ..... $35,394 33 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT, 97 

Amount brought forward . . . . ■ . $35,394 33 

Debit. 

Taxes, for amount of abatements on 

taxes $24,027 60 

Broadway Parkway, amount transferred, 4,500 00 

Excess and Deficiency, amount trans- 
ferred . . . . . 4,323 99 

Balance to credit in account 1893 . 2,402 74 



POLICE. 



Credit. 



Appropriations, amount assessed 
Cash, received of the state bank and 
corporation taxes . 
H. A. Chapin, clerk of court, 

officers' fees, fines, etc. . 
John M. Fisk, master of house 

of correction, fines, etc. 
Michael Collins, old zinc, etc. . 



Debit 



>35,394 33 



OVERPLUS ON TAX SALES. 

Credit. 
Balance from 1891 |102 13 

Debit. 
Balance to 1893 . $102 13 



Cash, paid M. C. Parkhurst, chief 
Robert R. Perry, captain . 
Samuel R. Dow, sergeant . 

Amounts carried forward . . $4,400 00 $43,321 97 



• 


$24,000 00 


$17,250 07 




1,706 01 




353 50 




12 39 






19,321 97 






$43,321 97 


$1,900 00 




1,500 00 




1,000 00 





98 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . ^4,400 00 
Edward McGarr, sergeant . 1,200 00 
Christopher G. Cavanagh, ser- 
geant ..... 1,200 00 
Dennis Kelley, sergeant . . 1,166 90 
John F. Johnson, patrolman, 1,098 00 
Eugene A. Carter, " 1,098 00 
George L. Smith, " 1,095 00 
Edward N. Carter, " 1,098 00 
Samuel A. Brown, " 1,098 00 
John K Fuller, " 1,098 00 
George VV. Bean, '' 1,098 00 
George A. Bodge, " 1,098 00 
Phineas W. Skinner, " 1,098 00 
Hubert H, Miller, '' 1,096 00 
Edward E. Hamblin, " 1,098 00 
John Hafford, " 1,098 00 
Albion L. Staples, " 1,098 00 
George H. Carleton, " 1,098 00 
Judson W. Oliver, " 1,098 00 
Francis A. Perkins, " 1,098 00 
Charles S. Thrasher, " 1,098 00 
William H. Johnston, " 1,095 00 
Charles E. Woodman, " 1,080 00 
Arthur E. Keating, " 1,098 00 
John G. Knight, " 1,098 00 
Stephen S. Smith, *' 1,095 00 
Jacob W. Skinner, " 1,098 00 
Theodore E. Herron, " 1,072 25 
David A. Bolton, " 920 25 
John A. Dadman, '\ 307 50 
Ulysses G. Skinner, " 572 50 
George T. E. Coles, " 562 50 
James M. Harmon, " 562 50 
Michael T. K^ennedy, " 560 00 
Charles W. Stevens, " 560 00 
Ira S. Carleton, " 557 50 



143,321 97 



Amounts carried foncard 



^38,865 90 143,321 97 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT, 



99 



Amounts brought J orward 


$38,865 90 $43,321 97 


Ezra A. Dodge, patrolman, 


557 


50 


Eugene H. Gammons, " 


555 


00 


Zeba F.Coffin, patrolman, special, 


59 


50 


Davis P. Bucknam, ' 




7 


50 


Jeremiah J. Meaney, ' 




10 


00 


Peter Savage, ' 




11 


50 


N. L. Pennock, 




20 


50 


William H. Kelley, 




189 


00 


Andrew S. Arnold, ' 




18 


00 


William H. Whitcomb, ' 




2 


50 


George C. Foss, ' 




8 


00 


James McLeod, ' 




4 


00 


Daniel H. Rinn, ' 




8 


00 


William J. Blaisdell, 




4 


00 


B. F. Sheridan, ' 




8 


00 


A. A. Lewis, * 




8 


00 


Joseph Young, ' 




8 


00 


L. M. Maynard, ' 




8 


00 


John F. Cotter, ' 




8 


00 


Peter J. Savage, ' 




12 


00 


Alfred M. Sibley, 




4 


00 


Edward F. Reed, 




8 


00 


WilUam F. C. Blaisdell, ' 




4 


00 


Fred S. Young, ' 




4 


00 


Lewis R. Stewart, ' 




4 


00 


Alex. Penny, work in stable 


15 75 


M. C. Parkhurst, lock-up keeper, 


100 


00 


M. C. Parkhurst, disbursements, 


19 


22 


Samuel R. Dow, disbursements. 


26 


61 


Dennis Kelley, disbursements . 


27 


78 


Robert R. Perry, disbursements. 


4 


60 


Edward M. Carter, disburse- 






ments 




51 


Lemuel H. Snow, disbursements, 


25 


89 


Fulton O'Brion, hay and grain . 


251 


89 


Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing . 


26 


88 


Amounts carried forward . 


$40,846 03 $43,321 97 



100 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forivard 
E. Spalding, harness work 
D. J. Bennett, harness work 
W. E. Plumer, hardware . 
Howe & Flint, hardware . 
L. M. Ham & Co.. ironwork 
William T. Henderson, painting 

wagon .... 
Boston Woven Hose & Rubber 

Co., matting . 
James Bartley, soap, etc. 
George H. Cowdin, sponges 
W. Schuebeler, towels 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., carpets 
J. N. Porter, meals 

C. B. Cheney, photographs 
John P. Lovell Arms Co., re 

volvers .... 
Joseph C. Power, badges . 
Scovelle Manfg. Co., buttons 
George W. Simmons & Co. 

wreaths .... 
Simon Connor, wreaths 
H, A. Winship, regalia 

D. Cutter, repairing badges 
Union Glass Co., globes . 
Elijah Walker, carpentering 
Fresh Pond Ice Co., ice 

N. Davis & Co., water cooler 
Thomas Groom & Co., sta 

tionery .... 
M. L. Vinal, stationery 
Little, Brown, & Co., law books 
M. R. Warren, law books . 
W^ A. Greenough & Co., direc- 
tory , . . . 
Citizen Publishing Co., printing, 

AmoiiJits carried fonuaf d . 



$40,846 03 


143,321 97 


4 40 




50 




23 43 




4 10 




1 00 





25 00 



22 


32 


1 


76 


5 


20 


11 


40 


15 


50 


31 


25 


4 


00 


113 


^7 


30 


25 


10 


13 


4 


50 


5 


00 


31 


00 




75 


14 


50 


1 


30 


22 


50 


12 


00 


52 


88 


1 


30 


17 


50 


16 


50 


2 


00 


*> 

^ 


00 


$41,333 


87 $43,321 97 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



101 



Amounts brought forward 
C. M. Blake, newspapers . 
Pettingill, Andrews, Co., electri- 
cal supplies . . . . 
National Electric Co., electrical 
supplies . . . . 

Municipal Signal Co., electrical 
supplies . . . . 

Cornelius Callahan & Co., elec- 
trical supplies 
Gillis & Gleeson, repairs of sig- 
nal service . . . . 
Union Square Carriage Co., re- 
pairs . . . . . 
L. D. Miller, stable supplies 
Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel. 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., rentals and tolls 
S. J. Wood, keys, etc. 
A. Babson, mending flag 
Ray's Laundry, washing 
F. G. Ray & Son, washing 
James Sullivan, labor 
Cornelius Sullivan, labor 
James Fitzpatrick, labor 
Jacob H. Tracy, labor 
James D. Perkins, labor 
Samuel A. Coombs, labor 
George L. Blackbird, labor 
Fred A. Blackburn, labor . 
Frank W. Nicholson, labor 
Charles E. Farnham, expressing, 
Gilman's Express, expressing 
James F. Fitzgerald, carriage 

hire . . . . 

Stephen F. Cate, carriage hire 
Dodge & Reed, carriage hire 

Amounts carried forward 



$41,333 87 
21 90 


$43,321 97 


158 73 




55 39 




15 50 





12 00 

4 50 

48 50 

5 00 
55 10 

568 25 
1 50 

1 00 

2 26 
21 33 



00 

00 
00 
00 
00 



36 00 
32 00 
15 00 
15 00 

2 50 
65 

5 5t) 

13 25 

8 00 



$42,448 73 $43,321 97 



102 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward 

Frank W. Leavitt, carriage hire, 

John H. Kelley, carriage hire 

Charles W. Dailey, use of ambu- 
lance ..... 

L. H. Brown, carriage hire 

W. H. Way, veterinary services, 

Emery L. White, professional 

services ..... 5 00 

Boston Police Department, po- 
lice officers .... 

City of Lowell, police officers . 

City of Maiden, police officers . 

City of Cambridge, police 
officers . . . . . 

City of Newton, police officers . 

N. F. Hardy, refreshments 

Excess and Deficiency, balance 
to credit of account 



POLICE STATION INCIDENTALS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed 
Cash, received of Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts, rent of armory, 
Somerville Co-operative Bank, 

use of court room . 



Debit. 
Cash, paid William D. Hayden, janitor, f 850 00 
William D. Hayden, disburse- 
ments 4 00 

Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas . 697 60 



$42,448 73 


$43,321 97 


2 00 




30 00 




22 00 




13 00 




18 50 





156 78 
78 00 
16 00 




71 45 
34 00 

93 75 




$42,989 21 




332 76 


$43,321 97 





. 


$3,500 00 


$400 00 




30 00 


430 00 








$3,930 00 



Amounts carried forward . . $1,551 60 $3,930 00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



103 



Amounts brought forward 

City of Boston, water 

New England Telephone & Tele 
graph Co., rental and tolls 

Boston Germicide Co., service 

James F. Davlin, plumbing 

Richard Dowd, plumbing . 

W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 

J. A. Durell, hardware 

Howe & Flint, hardware . 

John R. Thompson, carpenter 
ing .... 

J. H. Keenan, carpentering 

A. M. Godfrey, carpentering 

D, P. Bucknam, mason work 

J. Q. Twombly, painting . 

Fred A. Norris, painting . 

Patrick O'Connell, painting 

L. C. Seavey, slating 

Boston Woven Hose Co., mat 
ting .... 

George W. Hurn& Co., cleaning 
carpets . 

W. H. Brine, shades . 

P. Derby & Co., chairs 

Derby & Kilmer Desk Co., desk 
and chairs 

H. Wellington & Co., fuel 

Charles Billman, labor on flag- 
staff 

Union Glass Co., globes 

S. J. Wood, keys 

Bigelow & Dowse, rope 

James Bartley, matches 



Excess and Deficiency, balance 
to credit of account 



^1,551 


60 


90 


70 


29 


55 


49 


95 


22 


64 


2 


75 


18 


03 


. 48 


50 


29 


35 


258 


16 


68 


20 


136 


28 


62 


35 


920 


92 


121 


02 


25 


13 


13 


,53 



$3,930 00 



10 07 



6 


98 


42 


61 


54 


50 


77 


00 


117 


06 


10 


00 


6 


50 


1 


00 


1 


00 




30 



13,775 68 



154 32 



— $3,930 00 



104 , ANNUAL REPORTS. 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Credit. 

Appropriation, amount assessed . .... $6,300|00 

Cash, received of Citizen Publishing 

Company, discount on bill . $8 25 

Excess and Deficiency, balance 

to debit of account . . 545 21 

— 553 46 

$6,853 46 
Debit. 

Cash, paid Somerville Journal Company, 

printing, etc. .... $3,171 30 

Citizen Publishing Co., printing, 

etc. . « . . . 267 76 

McDonnell Bros., printing, etc., 119 00 

Rockwell & Churchill, printing, 

etc 942 70 

Beacon Lithograph Co., printing, 

v^tU* « • • • • 

Babb & Stephens, printing, etc., 

J. L. Mcintosh, printing, etc. 

Thomas Groom & Co., printing 
and stationery 

W. A. Greenough & Co., direc- 
tories ..... 

$6,853 46 



PROPERTY AND DEBT BALANCE. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1891 $640,137 46 

Public Property, property acquired dur- 
ing the year 1892 . . . $69,814 12 
Reduction of funded debt . . . 104,000 00 

Renewals of funded debt . . . 28,000 00 

201,814 12 



112 


50 


68 


50 


16 


16 


2,143 


54 


12 


00 



Amount carried forward ..... $841,951 b% 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



105 



Amount brought forward . . 

Debit. 

Appropriations, amount borrowed on 

funded debt account . . $228,000 00 
Amount authorized for which the 

bonds have not been issued . 53,000 00 
Public Property, amount sold during 

the year 1892 . . . 3,100 00 

Balance to credit in account 1893 . 557,851 58 



$841,951 58 



$841,951 58 



PUBLIC GROUNDS. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount assessed 
Interest, amount transferred 
Schoolhouse Incidentals, grading 



Amounts carried forward . 



$4,300 00 

1,400 00 

567 12 





" 


$6,267 12 


Debit. 






Cash, paid laborers 


. $3,579 78 




Somerville Electric Light Co. 


J 




lighting ... 


300 30 




T. F. Crimmings, teaming 


432 52 




A. M. Prescott, teaming 


211 50 




A. M. Prescott, grain 


17 23 




Christopher Burke, teaming 


122 72 




Henry Gray, teaming 


21 90 




Martin Gill, teaming 


15 50 




Jonathan Brown, loam 


44 70 




Charles A. Mongan, loam, etc. 


118 00 




Heirs Nathan Tufts, Sr., loam 


69 85 




H. W. P. Colson, sods 


76 60 




Charles Callahan, manure 


4 5(» 




Eugene Ford, manure 


10 17 




John Galvin, manure . 


7 62 




Daniel Hoar, manure 


13 47 





$5,046 36 



$6,267 12 



106 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
John W. Hennessey, manure 
L. M. Maynard, manure 
John Monahan, manure 
John Sweeney, manure 
J. T. Molloy, manure 
Joseph Breck & Sons, seed 
Ames Plow Co., horse boots 
Parker & Wood, plow, etc. 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
Howe & Flint, hardware . 
M. D. Jones & Co., hardware 
F. C. Ayer, agent, lumber . 
I. H. Brown & Co., lumber 
Portland Stone Ware Co., pipe 
W. J. Cogan, painting 
L. A. Wright, repairing cart 
John R. Farnham, trees 
Green Brothers, plants, etc. 
S. J. Wood, keys 
C. L, Underhill, repairing tools 
Joseph Young, repairing tools 
Young & Maynard, plumbing 
L, H. Brown, carriage hire 

F. DeWitt Lapham, premium of 
insurance . . . , 

G. W. Manning, labor on flag- 
staff .... 

Charles E. Farnham, expressing 

J. Q. Twombly, painting . 

R. E. Archibald, painting . 

Citizen Publishing Co., advertis 
ing .... 

Somerville Journal Co., advertis- 
ing .... 

Seba F. Coffin, police officer 

Jere J. Meaney, police officer 

Amounts carried forward . 



$5,046 


36 


6 


75 


24 


20 


15 


24 


10 


17 


19 


50 


229 


98 


9 


00 


15 


80 


134 


89 


1 


73 


3 


60 


82 


83 


10 


05 


5 


72 


16 


50 


3 


45 


10 


00 


90 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 


17 


30 


1 


50 



6,267 12 



10 00 
10 00 

26 20 
7 35 
2 00 

19 29 

5 50 



• 4 


00 


27 


50 


37 


50 



$5,906 41 



$6,267 12 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 107 

Amounts brought forward . $5,906 41 $6,267 12 

Sidewalk Assessments, side- 
walks ..... 

Sewers account, catch-basin 

Watering Streets account, water- 
ing . . . . . 

J. A. Durell, hardware 



Excess and Deficiency, balance 
to credit of account 



205 


97 


58 


92 


71 


01 


17 


29 


$6,259 


60 


7 


52 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Little, Brown, & Co., books, $916 02 

Estes & Lauriat, books 
George E. Littlefield, books 
C. L. Webster & Co., books 
Naturalist Bureau, books . 



402 


14 


628 47 


12 


00 


2 


60 



$6,267 12 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $4,000 00 

Balance from 1891 . . . . $3 48 

Cash, received of J. O. Hayden, county 
treasurer, return on the 
amount received of the city 
for dog licenses in 1891 . 1,003 97 

H. A. Adams, librarian, fines . 420 14 

Catalogues . . . . 33 90 

A. S. Hudson, discount on bill, 4 00 

Excess and Deficiency, balance 

to debit of account . . 335 44 

1,800 93 



$5,800 93 



Amounts carried forward . . $1,961 23 ' $5,800 93 



108 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought for^vard 
J. G. Cupples, books 
J. H. Lamb, books 
P. F. Collier, books . 
Charles H. Kilham, books 

A. S. Hudson, books 

B. N. Galpin, books . 
Houghton, Mifflin, & Co., books 
Balch Brothers, books 

Salem Press Publishing Co. 

books .... 
J. G. Roberts & Co., binding 

books 

E. H. Sheldon, magazine covers 
W. A. Greenough & Co., direc 

tory .... 

Somerville Journal Co., news 

papers .... 
Thomas Groom & Co., station 

ery .... 

Babb & Stephens, printing 
Rockwell & Churchill, printing 
A. A. Sanborn, steam boiler 
N. W. Turner & Co., gas fixtures 
Harrison, Beard, & Co., book 

cases .... 
T. F. McGann, bookcases 

F. A. Chandler, carpenter work 
L. C. Seavey, repairing roof 
Young & Maynard, plumbing 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 

N. L. Chamberlain, ribbon 
L. G. Field, brush 
Gilman's Express, expressing 
E. R. Perham, expressing . 
Charles E. Farnham, expressing 
City of Boston, water 

Amounts carried forward . 



$1,961 23 

5 00 

6 00 
10 00 

5 75 

4 00 

2 00 

40 00 

75 00 

2 00 

109 85 

27 50 

2 00 
12 00 



$5,800 93 



5 


85 


134 


75 


129 


36 


460 


73^ 


130 


75 


60 


00 


42 


00 


5 


46 


2 


08 


2 


10 


2 


40 


1 


50 


3 


00 


41 


40 


31 


15 


30 


72 


29 


00 



$3,374 58 



$5,800 93 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT, 



109 



Amounts brought forward 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
H. Wellington & Co., fuel 
C. C. Searles, disinfectant 
H. A. Adams, librarian 
Anna L. Stone, assistant . 
Mary J. Warren, assistant 
Edith A. Woodman, assistant 
M. Gertrude Knapp, assistant 
F. Mable Norcross, assistant 
Harry B. Bullen, assistant 
William C. Hammond, assistant 
Elizabeth Goldsmith, assistant 
H, C. Garcelon, branch office 



. $3,374 


58 


197 


28 


18 


00 


1 


00 


800 


01 


400 


00 


400 


00 


156 


48 


118 


43 


131 


45 


55 


60 


36 


80 


11 


30 


100 


00 







$5,800 93 



— 15,800 93 



PUBLIC PROPERTY. 



Credit. 



Property and Debt Balance, property sold during the 

year 1892 . $3,100 00 

Balance to debit in account 1893 . . . . 1,752,351 58 



Debit. 

Balance from 1891 . . . $1,685,637 46 
Property and Debt Balance, property 

acquired in 1892 . . . 69,814 12 



$1,755,451 58 



$1,755,451 58 



REAL-ESTATE LIENS. 



Credit. 



Balance to 1893 



Debit. 



Balance from 1891 



$888 40 
$888 40 



110 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

REDUCTION OF FUNDED DEBT. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $60,000 00 
Cash, Maverick National Bank divi- 
dends $77,185 00 

City of Boston, return on water 

rates . . . . . 6,896 71 

84,081 71 



Debit. 

Property and Debt Balance, amount of 

reduction of funded debt in 

1892 $104,000 00 

Balance to credit in account 1893 . 40,081 71 



$144,081 71 



$144,081 71 



BBgg^k.■^(llti^f<^an 



RENEWALS OF FUNDED DEBT. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount assessed .... $28,000 00 

Debit. 

Property and Debt Balance, amount of funded debt 

renewed in 1892 $28,000 00 



RELIEF AND BURIAL OF INDIGENT SOLDIERS AND 

SAILORS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $3,000 00 

State of Massachusetts, one-half of 



amount paid for burials in 1892, 


$87 50 




Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit 






of account .... 


942 42 


1,029 42 








$4,029 42 


Debit. 






Cash, paid monthly pay rolls 


. 


$4,029 42 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT, 111 

SALARIES. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $31,085 00 

Cash, W. C. Bailey, Jr., error in pay roll, $6 92 

Excess and Deficiency, balance 

to debit of account . . 366 20 

373 12 



131,458 12 



Debit. 

Cash, paid William H. Hodgkins, mayor, 

George I. Vincent, city clerk 

John F. Cole, city treasurer and 
collector of taxes . 

Horace L. Eaton, city engineer, 

Selwyn Z. Bowman, city solicitor, 

Alvah B. Dearborn, city physi- 
cian ..... 

Charles S. Robertson, city audi- 
tor ...... 

Charles S. Robertson, clerk of 
Common Council . 

William P. Mitchell, clerk of 
committees .... 

Albert B. Fales, clerk of asses- 
sors ..... 

Sarah A. Miles, assistant to 
treasurer .... 

Beulah M. Peirce, department 
clerk . . . . . 

Beulah M. Pierce, assistant to 
treasurer .... 

Alice T. Sleeper, assistant to 
clerk of assessors . . 

Alice T. Sleeper, assistant to 
treasurer .... 



Amounts carried foi ward . . $16,655 00 $31,458 12 



$1,000 00 




2,300 


00 




3,200 


00 




2,400 


00 




1,500 


00 




950 


00 




500 


00 




250 


00 




1,500 


00 




1,500 


00 




200 


00 




175 


00 




600 00 




45 


00 




535 


00 





112 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . ^16,655 00 .f 31,458 12 

Amy L. Manning, assistant to 

city clerk .... 650 00 

Katharine W. Wood, assistant to 

clerk of assessors . . . 314 99 

Frederick W. Cook, assistant to 

clerk of committees . . 423 33 

Jairus Mann, city messenger . 1,500 00 

Thomas R. .Roulstone, inspector 

of buildings .... 1,800 00 

William H. Whitcomb, janitor of 

City Hall and Public Library, 800 00 

Thomas Cunningham, inspector 

of milk 300 00 

Thomas Cunningham, inspector 

of provisions . . . . 100 00 

James R. Hopkins, superintend- 
ent of electric lines . . 250 00 

BenjaminF. Thompson, assessor, 750 00 

George W. Hadley, assessor . 750 00 

Samuel T. Richards, assessor . 750 00 

Joshua H. Davis, assistant as- 
sessor ..... 62 50 

Edward G. Wiswell, assistant ' 

assessor .... 187 50 

William A. Flaherty, assistant 

assessor .... 250 00 

Edgar T. Mayhew, assistant 

assessor . . . . 250 00 

Harry A. True, assistant as- 
sessor 250 00 

Cromwell G. Rowell, registrar of 

• voters . . . . . 200 00 

Charles P. Lincoln, registrar of 

voters 200 00 

William B. Hawes, registrar of 

voters 200 00 



Amounts carried forward . . $26,643 32 $31,458 12 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 113 

Amounts brought forward . ^26,643 32 $81,468 12 

George I, Vincent, registrar of 

voters 200 00 

Florence M. Grow, clerical ser- 
vices ..... 185 00 

Helen G. Frye, clerical services, 43 00 

Lottie T. Horton, clerical ser- 
vices 37 00 

Engineer's assistants . . 4,399 80 

$31,458 12 



SCHOOL TEACHERS' SALARIES. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $108,000 00 

Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit of account . 58 81 



$108,058 81 



Debit. 
Cash, paid salaries . . ..... $108,058 81 



SCHOOL CONTINGENT. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $13,000 00 

Cash, received of D. F. McCurdy, 

tuition of non-resident pupil . $16 00 

Wilbur F. Warren, tuition of 

non-resident pupil . . 8 00 

F. W. Whitney, tuition of non- 
resident pupil ... 8 00 

Cyrus K. Wood, tuition of non- 
resident pupil . . . 15 00 

Winslow T. Perkins, tuition of 

non-resident pupil . . . 15 00 



Amounts carried forward . . $62 00 $13,000 00 



114 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
Highways account, rental of tele- 
phone ..... 
Excess and Deficiency, balance 
to debit of account 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Clarence E. Meleney, salary 

as superintendent of schools, 

Disbursements 
L. H. Snow, truant officer . 
L. H. Snow, school census 
Jairus Mann, truant officer 
C. M. Taylor, clerk in superin 

tendent's office 
Ginn & Co., books 
Lee & Shepard, books 
Leach, Shewell, & Sanborn 

books .... 
The Interstate Publishing Co. 

books .... 
University Publishing Co., books 
Edward E. Babb & Co., books 
Allyn & Bacon, books 
DeWolfe, Fiske, & Co., books 
Carl Schoenhof, books 
Boston School Supply Co., books, 
Silver, Burdett, & Co., books 
American Book Co., of New 

York, books . 
American Book Co., books 
William Ware & Co., books 
Willard Small, books 
Effingham, Maynard, & Co., 

books ..... 
Houghton, Mifflin, & Co , books. 



122 10 

34 70 
673 15 
115 43 

19 34 

9 00 

233 7B 

327 26 

160 6a 

25 00 

1,459 20 

157 45 

70 69 

14 55 
12 39 



.^62 00 


$13,000 00 


3 


00 






131 


81 










196 


81 






O A 




$13,196 


81 


$2,500 


02 






25 


21 






900 


00 






100 


00 






49 


98 






300 


00 






481 


31 






135 


44 







Amounts carried forward . 



$7,926 58 $13,196 81 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



115 



Amounts brought forward 
D. Lothrop & Co., books . 
Joseph Watrous, book covers 

D. C. Heath & Co., maps, etc. 
Thompson, Brown, & Co., cards 
Prang Educational Co., paper 

etc. .... 

A. E. Whitten, blocks 
S. N. Ufford & Son, forms 
R. H. Stearns & Co., ribbon 
Shepard, Norwell, & Co., ribbon 

E. O. White, flowers . 

F. W. Kaan, flowers . 
Pranklin Educational Co., sup 

plies .... 
Augusta L. Balch, supplies 
Maizie E. Blaikie, supplies 
Frost & Adams, supplies . 
George S. Perry & Co., supplies 
Weeks, Potter, & Co., supplies 
The Thorp & Martin Mfg. Co. 

supplies .... 
The Thorp* & Adams Mfg. Co. 

supplies ... 
George Y . King & Merrill, sup 

plies .... 
W. E. Plumer & (^o., supplies 
Withall, Tatum, & Co., supplies 
D. H. Rinn, supplies 
J. L. Hammett, supplies 
Smith & White, supplies 
Library Bureau, supplies 
Daniel F. Ames, supplies 
Carter, Rice, & Co., supplies 
Pulsifer, Jordan, & Co., supplies 
Holland & Daniels, mounting 

maps .... 

Amounts carried forward . 



$7,926 58 

26 05 

160 05 

55 50 

96 92 

1,236 54 

60 00 

3 50 

4 68 
7 88 
3 75 

75 

3 12 

2 15 

3 65 

28 80 

122 36 

15 08 

17 60 

30 88 

559 40 

44 91 

7 93 

75 

327 49 

44 00 

61 40 
20 81 

3 56 
6 62 

11 50 



$13,196 81 



$10,894 21 $13,196 81 



116 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amowits brought fonvard 
Stewart & Co., clay . 
Carlos L. Page & Co., boxes 
R. W. Karnan & Co., cases 
J. G. Roberts & Co., binding 

books .... 
George E. Nichols, disburse 



,894 21 


$13,196 81 


8 90 




1 93 




1 80 





11 40 



ments ..... 


20 51 




John S. Hayes, disbursements . 


35 73 




F. W. Shattuck, disbursements . 


17 27 




George L. Baxter, disburse- 






ments ..... 


4 80 




M. J. Wendall, disbursements . 


4 65 




H. N. Andrews, disbursements . 


5 55 




G. M. Wadsworth, disburse- 






ments . . 


21 22 




Charles E. Brainard, disburse- 






ments . . . 


23 83 




G. A. Southworth, disburse- 






ments ..... 


8 00 




Boston Bank Note Co., diplomas. 


81 43 




C. A. French, filling in diplomas, 


76 10 




W. A. Green ough & Co., direc- 


- 




tory ..... 


2 00 




H. C. Dimond & Co., stamp 


20 




J. C. Haynes & Co., repairing 






drums ..... 


2 00 




J. H. Bremner & Co., frames 


8 70 




Somerville Journal Co., printing, 


569 59 




Citizen Publishing Co., printing, 


120 00 




Howe & Flint, hardware . 


4 25 




Frederic A. Chandler, carpenter- 






ing ..... 


39 30 




E. F. Daniels, tuning pianos 


8 00 




Joseph Young, labor 


3 00 




Thomas N. Hart, rent of P. 0. 






box ..... 


3 00 




Amounts carried forward . 


$11,977 37 


$13,196 81 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



117 



Amounts brought forward 
City of Boston, water 
City of Cambridge, water 
Charlestown Gas Co., gas 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
Somerville Electric Light Co 

lighting .... 
N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., rental, etc. 
A. M. Prescott, teaming 
Charles E. Farnham, expressing 
Gilman's Express, expressing 
Stilphen & Co., expressing 

E. R. Perham, expressing 

F. D. Woodbridge, expressing 
Barker & Tibbetts, expressing 



$11,977 37 

593 45 

17 50 

137 92 

208 32 

107 21 



$13,196 81 



31 


90 


39 


00 


68 


79 


4 


50 


4 


15 


2 


90 


3 


50 




30 



$13,196 81 



SCHOOL CONTINGENT, JANITORS' SALARIES. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount assessed .... 

Debit. 
Cash, paid salaries .... $9,794 92 
Excess and Deficiency, balance 

to credit of account . . 205 08 



$10,000 00 



$10,000 00 



SCHOOL FUEL. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed 



$7,150 00 



Amount carried forward . 



$7,150 00 



118 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amotmt brought forward , . . . . $7,150 00 

Debit. 

Cash, paid H. Wellington & Co., fuel . $2,733 40 

B. F. Wild & Co., fuel . . 2,111 89 

G. M. Winslow & Co., fuel . 1,798 04 

J. A. Porter, fuel . . . 504 35 



17,147 68 
Excess and Deficiency, balance 

to credit of account . . 2 32 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Frederick A. Chandler, car- 
pentering .... $634 99 
C. A. Slager, carpentering . 478 72 
John D. Hills, carpentering . 267 94 



$7,150 00 



SCHOOLHOUSE INCIDENTALS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $10,000 00 

Interest, amount transferred ..... 1,500 00 

Cash, received of Ellen Hayes, land on 

Prospect Street . . . $2,340 00 
Perkins-street Baptist Church, 

use of ward room . . . 115 00 
Frank Timney, junk ... 19 07 
Frederick A. Chandler, old ven- 
tilator 3 00 



2,477 07 

Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit of 

account 3,757 11 



$17,734 18 



Amounts carried forward . . $1,381 65 $17,734 18 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



11^ 



Amounts brought forward 
George W. Trefren, Jr., carpen- 
tering ..... 
John R. Thompson, carpenter- 
ing . . 
H. S. Brackett, carpentering 
Fuller & Mathews, carpentering, 
J. E. Herrick, carpentering 
A. M. Godfrey, carpentering 
Gillis Brothers, carpentering 
Thomas Gordan, carpentering . 
I. H. Brown & Co., carpenter- 
ing 

D. P. Bucknam, mason work 
A. C. Winning, mason work 
P. Lacey, mason work 
Coon & Hall, mason work 
John Kennedy, mason work 
J. E. Parsons, plumbing 
James Y . Davlin, plumbing 
Young »& Maynard, plumbing 
C. W. Cahalan, plumbing . 
Charles A. Holmes, plumbing . 
W. L. Snow, plumbing 
C. A. Legallee, plumbing . 
W. S. Hanna & Co., plumbing, 
Duncan C. Greene, plumbing 
J. E. Merrifield, stove work, etc., 
J. W. Johnson, stove work, etc., 
J. A. Durell, hardware, etc. 
Howe & Flint, hardware, etc. 
W. E. Plumer, hardware, etc. 
Bigelow & Dowse, hardware, etc., 
Whitney & Snow, hardware, etc., 
F. C. Fuller & Son, hardware, 

etc. 

W. I. Heald, hardware, etc. 

Amounts carried forward . 



1,381 65 ^17,734 18 



183 48 



139 


19 


126 45 


31 


85 


49 


98 


43 


15 


25 


75 


13 


51 




60 


332 


33 


487 


00 


81 


85 


40 


65 


19 


98 


93 


37 


69 


36 


80 


66 


52 


18 


6 


89 


12 75 


3 


62 


3 


15 




75 


178 


13 


101 


35 


295 


83 


575 


53 


142 


19 


864 


03 


33 


77 


35 


64 


9 


74 



$5,516 36 $17,734 18 



120 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
Dupont & Cote, hardware, etc. 
Goodwin & Cutler, painting 

C. H. Tufts, painting 
J. F. Burton, painting 
A. Fisher, painting 

D. W. McDermott, painting 
J. H. Hollis, painting 
Fred A. Norris, painter 

E. P. Peterson, painter 
S. W. Fuller, lumber . 

F. C. Ayer, agent, lumber . 
James Deacon, whitewashing 
Fred Davis, whitewashing 

L. C. Seavey, slating 
Williams & Co., slate 

G. C. Dunklee, furnace 

A. A. Sanborn, steam fitting 
Braman, Dow, & Co., steam fit 

ting 

Fuller & Warren W. & V. Co. 

steam fitting . 
Walker & Pratt Mfg. Co., fur 

nace brush 
Somerville Iron Foundry Co. 

grates .... 
Continental Grate Co., grates 
The S. M. Howes Co., shakers 
Seward Dodge, bolts 
J. L. Hammett, repairing black 

boards .... 
George S. Perry, repairing black- 
boards .... 
J. E. Bell, repairing blackboards 
Jordan, Marsh, & Co., carpet 
H. H. Cotton & Co., carpet 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., carpet 

Amounts carried forward . 



$5,516 36 


$17,734 18 


3 28 




209 45 




167 58 




156 81 




455 00 




138 95 




134 39 




122 47 




15 00 




164 69 




4 61 




35 50 




83 07 




77 88 




48 00 




415 00 




373 75 





35 24 

2 50 

1 25 

39 45 

47 75 

4 50 

9 00 

207 83 



67 63 




60 01 




111 37 




98 67 




17 15 




$8,824 14 


$17,734 18 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



i2i 



Amounts brought forward 
Winchester Furniture Co., furni 

ture .... 

Pond Desk Co., furniture . 
Chandler Adjustable Chair and 

Desk Co., furniture 
Jarvis Engineering Co., furniture 
P. Derby & Co., furniture 
George S. McCrillis, trustee, 

furniture . . . 

George F. Roach & Co., furni 

ture .... 
A. G. Whitcomb, ink wells 
Conant Bros. & Bragg Co., 

mirrors .... 
William Hall & Co., card plates 
Samuel Barker, wall paper 
G. F. Ericson, repairing furni 

ture .... 

T. A. Wellman, repairing furni 

ture .... 

F. D. Snow, door checks . 
Jacob Woodbury, iron work 
H. G. Collins, iron work . 
I. L. Corthell, electric work 

G. M. D. Fernald, electric work 
Page & Littlefield, mouldings 
George F. Hurn & Co., cleaning 

carpets .... 
William H. Brine, repairing 

furniture 
F. H. Flagg, repairs . 
S. J. Wood, fitting keys, etc. 
Frederic R. Cutter, cleaning 

clocks, etc. 
Daniel Crocker, cleaning clocks 

etc. 



^,824 14 

364 60 
261 60 

130 00 
25 00 
51 33 

6 00 



17,734 18 



5 


00 


24 


10 


7 


50 


1 


80 


13 


90 



91 25 

6 00 
36 75 
3 05 
1 00 
16 35 
9 10 
1 89 

18 41 

6 50 

1 50 

40 25 

48 50 

81 00 



Amounts carried forward . 



10,076 52 117,734 18 



122 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
Moulton C. Libby, cleaning 

clocks, etc. 
George F. Horton, cleaning 

clocks, etc. 
J. Q. Tvvombly, painting, glaz 

ing, etc. 
J. A. Litchfield, soda 
Charles E. Holske, agent, soap 
A. F. Carpenter, soap 
Portland Stoneware Co., pipe 
Charlestown Gas Co., pipe 
Boston Woven Hose & Rubber 

Co., hose 
Boston Spar Co., flag-staffs 
J. W. Conners, fence 
Samuel Rindge, granite step 
American Sanitary Association 

carbolic liquid 
Boston Germicide Co., service 
Joseph Breck & Sons, seed 
Christopher Burke, sods . 
Y. M. C. Association, loam 
Timothy F. Crimmings, manure 

etc. .... 

L. M. Maynard, manure, etc. 
Heirs Charles Robinson, land on 

Tufts street . 
Thomas Groom & Co., book 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
Anthony Haderbolets, rent 
Jeremiah McCarthy, edgestones 
R. M. Johnson, removing soil 
A. B. Colesworthy, labor . 
Patrick O'Connell, labor . 
C. A. Southwick, labor 
U. R. Lincoln, labor 



$10,076 52 
47 00 
22 55 

507 17 

75 

43 75 

1 68 

6 24 

4 50 

25 70 

82 00 

15 00 

10 00 

6 00 

91 80 

14 00 

132 50 

12 43 

43 10 
9 05 

2,142 00 

5 00 
1 60 

256 00 

141 48 

132 00 

17 00 

112 37 

38 25 

12 50 



f 17,734 18 



Amounts carried forward . 



$14,009 94 $17,734 18 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



V2S 



Amounts brought forward 

D. R. Spike, labor 
John O'Brien, labor . 
N. L. Pennock, labor 
H. F. White, labor . 
John White, labor 
Mrs. Saltmarsh, labor 
Mrs. Powell, labor 
Mrs. Fitzsimmonds, labor 
Mrs. Purcell, labor 
Catherine M. Porter, labor 
G. W. Prichard, teaming 
M. G. Staples, teaming 
Preston J. Gould, teaming 
A. M. Prescott, teaming 
H. A. Chick & Co., teaming 

E. R. Perham, expressing 
Woodbridge & Co., express- 
ing ..... 

Martin O'Shaughnessy, express- 
ing 

Gilman's Express, expressing 

W. H. Laskey, expressing 

L. H. Brown, carriage hire 

Laborers, pay roll 

Dana W. Bennett& Co., premium 
of insurance .... 

I. B. Kendall, premium of insur- 
ance . . . . . 

Arthur T. Hatch, premium of in- 
surance . . 

Smith & Robertson, premium of 
insurance .... 

Crane & Woods, premium of 
insurance . . . . 

Joseph J. Giles, premium of in- 
surance . . . . 

Amounts carried Jorward . 



. $14,009 94 $17,734 18 


5 


50 


5 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 


10 


00 


7 


20 


9 


50 


9 


00 


6 


40 




50 


49 


50 


26 


50 


2 


00 


63 


50 


g • 1 


00 


21 


50 



14 50 



5 


00 




75 




30 


16 


00 


16 


13 


587 


25 


342 


00 


250 


25 


168 


75 


187 


50 


80 


25 


115,920 72 $17,734 18 



9 00 



124 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought J orward . f 15,920 72 $17,734 18 

Hartford Steam Boiler Insurance 

Co., premium of insurance . 50 00 

H. W. P. Colson, premium of in- 
surance .... 

City of Somerville, taxes . . 14 00 

Highways account, labor . . 56 10 

Public Grounds account, grading, 567 12 

. Watering Streets account, water- 
ing . . . . . 84 39 

Sewers account, catch-basins . 81 23 

Sewer Assessments account, 

sewers ..... 210 41 

Sidewalk Assessments account, 

sidewalks . . . . 741 21 

$17,734 18 



SCHOOLHOUSE IN WARD TWO. 

Credit. 
Balance from 1891 |600 00 

Debit. 
Cash, paid Dearborn Bros., balance of contract . $600 00 



SCHOOLHOUSE IN WARD TWO, PROSPECT HILL 
DISTRICT. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1891 $856 26 

Highland Schoolhouse addition, amount transferred, 294 62 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Loring & Phipps, architects, $260 88 

Balance to credit in account 1893, 890 00 



11.150 88 



$1,150 88 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 125 

SCHOOLHOUSE IN WARD THREE. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1891 $773 87 

I 

i Debit. 

Broadway Parkway, amount transferred . . . $773 87 



$11,217 50 
Balance tc credit in account 1893, 8,782 50 



SCHOOLHOUSE, EDGERLY ADDITION. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount appropriated by borrowing 

on funded debt account .... $20,000 00 

Debit. 

Cash, paid George M. Starbird, on ac- 
count of contract . . . $10,500 00 

Samuel D. Kelley, architect . 400 00 
Smith Heating & Ventilating 

Co., on account of contract . 298 50 

T. Harrington, labor . . 11 00 

H. F. White, labor ... 8 00 



$20,000 00 



SCHOOLHOUSE, HIGHLAND ADDITION. 

Credit. 
Balance from 1891 $318 03 

Debit. 

Schoolhouse in Ward Two, Prospect 

Hill district, account, amount 

transferred .... 
Broadway Parkway account, amount 

transferred .... 



$294 62 




23 41 






$318 03 





126 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION, 



Credit 



Interest, amount transferred 



$5,700 00 



Debit. 

Cash, J. A. Litchfield, rent of halls 

Charlestown Gas& Electric Co., 

lighting .... 
Battery A, M. V. M., services 
Boston & Maine R. R., transpor 

tation .... 
F. Abraham, refreshments 
Silas D. Carter, refreshments 
W. J. Esty, refreshments . 
Jackson Caldwell, refreshments 
Willard C. Kinsley Post, 139, G 

A. R., refreshments 
Somerville Cycle Club, refresh 

ments .... 
Goldsmith, Silver, & Co., re 

freshments 
J. N. Wright, refreshments 
Henry G. Swartz, catering 
Jesse A. Dill, catering 
M. R. Jones, catering 
H. V. Pratt, use of chairs 
Charles W. Allen, use of chairs, 
Masten & Wells Fireworks Mfg 

Co., fireworks 
Colonel William Beals, decora 

tions . . . 
James Martin & Son, tent 
Robert Miller & Co., tents 
Gillis Brothers, carpenter work, 
George M. Starbird, carpenter 

work .... 

Amojints carried forward . 



$120 00 



4 


40 


225 


00 


331 


50 


45 


00 


18 


50 


50 


00 


50 


00 



99 80 

200 00 

18 00 

10 50 

43 50 

982 00 

126 00 

109 77 

90 85 

500 00 



332 


70 


159 


25 


69 


00 


415 


00 


47 


04 



$4,047 81 



$5,700 00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



127 



Amounts brought forward 
N. Y. Brintnell & Co., use of 
horses . . . . . 
Robert Duddy, equipments 
Boston Regalia Co., regalia 
Charles O. Eaton, regalia 
Sons of Veterans, regalia . 
Arthur C. Gordan, signs . 
Miller Brothers, medals 
Joseph E. Power, badges . 
C. M. A. Twitchell, badges 
John A. Lowell & Co., engrav- 
ing 

E. H. Studley, engrossing com- 
mission . . 
Freeman & Taylor, clock . 
Somerville Journal Co., printing. 
Citizen Publishing Co., printing, 
M. W. Lombard, photographs . 
Charles W. Dailey, use of am- 
bulance . . . . 
George A. B. Stickney, medi- 
cines .... 
Pettingill & Pear, bedding . 
Thomas Groom & Co., sta 

tionery .... 
J. Stewart & Co., stationery 
Belknap & Co., stamp 
S. B. Kidder, typewriting . 
M. E. Kazar, typewriting . 
Ernest L. Newcomb, typewrit 

ing .... 

H. M. Weld & Co., barges 
J. H. Thompson, carriage hire 
James F. Ormand, carriage hire 
Draper Hall Stable Co., carriage 
hire . . . . . 



$4,047 81 

65 00 

11 25 
49 00 
15 00 

10 00 

48 00 
32 00 
40 80 

3 75 

84 50 

10 00 

12 00 
101 40 

8 00 
6 60 

12 00 



$5,700 00 



2 


00 


2 


60 


8 


00 


7 


75 


1 


50 


2 


75 


3 


85 


12 


00 


226 


00 


168 


00 


30 


00 



10 00 



Amounts carried forivard , 



$5,031 46 



$5,700 00 



128 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
R. E. Blackwell, carriage hire 
Arthur Black, carriage hire 
Howard Lowell, carriage hire 
George McKenna, carriage hire 
John Ducey, carriage hire 
L. H. Brown & Co., carriage hire 
A. M. Prescott, teaming . 
E. R. Perham, teaming 
Martin O'Shaughnessy, teaming 
H. A. Chick & Co., teaming 
A. J. Sawyer, grain . 
George E. Ricker, show cases 
Owen Ray, show cases 
Raymond, Griffin, & Co., show 

cases .... 
Albert E. Hughes, show cases 
Walter C. Mentzer, equipments, 
Henry W. Pitman, disburse 

ments .... 
E. C. Booth, disbursements 
Charles D. Elliot, disburse 

ments . . . . 
Frederic A. Chandler, carpenter 

ing 

Fred S. Young, labor 
Joseph Young, labor 
William H. Whitcomb, labor 
A. L. Elliot, labor 
Benjamin Brown, labor 



Balance to credit in account 1893, 



. $5,031 


46 


10 


00 


10 


00 


15 


00 


14 


00 


39 


00 


45 


00 


25 


20 


33 


00 


^ 


00 


1 


00 


3 


58 


17 


25 


20 


00 


V 

11 


10 


7 


00 


110 


00 


53 


75 


4 


50 



$5,700 00 



3 40 



27 12 




19 00 




8 00 




12 00 




7 75 




5 00 




$5,535 11 




164 89 






$5,700 00 





APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 129 

SEWERS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed . . . . $10,000 00 

Amount appropriated by, borrowing on funded debt 

account . ... ... . 8,000 00 

Cash, received of Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital, annual fee for 
permission to enter Fitchburg- 
street sewer .... $50 00 

True W. Townsend, fee for per- 
mission to enter Line-street 
sewer 67 08 

Charles F. Shourds, fee for per- 
mission to enter Elm-street 
sewer 81 00 

C. S. Philbrick, cost of sewer in 

Winslow avenue . . . 175 00 

Suther Blaikie, cost of sewer in 
private way off Somerville ave- 
nue . . . . . 109 12 

George D. Wildes and John 
Stackpole, cost of sewer in 
Melvin street ... 285 00 

S. F. Woodbridge, cost of sewer 

in White street ... 74 67 

Reuben P. Benton, cost of sewer 

in Cambria street . . . 180 00 

Henry Glover, cost of sewer in 

Dover street .... 90 00 

West End Street Railway Co., 

changing manhole . . 14 82 

Sidewalks account, edgestones . 94 33 

Public Grounds account, catch- 
basin . . . . . 58 92 

Broadway Parkway account, 

catch-basin .... 58 53 



Amounts carried forward . . $1,338 47 $18,000 00 



130 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



81 


23 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 



Amounts brought forward 
Highways, paving Union square 

and parts of Somerville and 

Webster avenues, changing 

grade . . . 
Schoolhouse Incidentals account, 

catch-basins . . . . 

John Foley, error in pay roll 
Michael Howard, error in pay 

roll ..... 

Andrew Foley, error in pay roll, 



$1,460 14 
Sewer Assessments, assessments 

levied 9,184 13 



Debit 
, paid laborers 
George D. Goodrich, drain pipe, 
Portland Stone Ware Co., drain 

pipe .... 
A. Parker, catch-basin stones 
Barbour, Stockwell, & Co., traps 
Osgood & Hart, covers, etc. 
W. A. Sanborn, bricks 
, Bay State Brick Co., bricks 
Thomas Casey, bricks 
George M. Winslow & Co. 

cement .... 
Berry & Ferguson, cement 
Horatio Wellington & Co. 

cement .... 
Jeremiah McCarthy, sand 
Dennis C. Collins, sand 
George H. Goodwin, loam 

Amounts carried forward . 



$1,338 47 $18,000 00 



10 44 







xv,vx-t ^1 




$28,644 27 


. $5,387 


90 




;, 1,034 


26 




509 


73 




706 


25 




87 


50 


/ 


200 


50 




321 


95 




203 


45 




4 


25 




[ 166 


10 




29 


50 




5 


20 




11 


00 




5 


00 




6 


16 




$8,678 75 


$28,644 27 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT, 



131 



Amounts brought forward 
John F. Ayer, lumber 
F. C. Ayer, agent, lumber 
I. H. Brown & Co,, lumber 
C. A. Slager, carpentering 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
J. A. Durell, hardware 
Howe & Flint, hardware . 
John Fisher, hardware 
William B. Holmes, lantern 
J. A. Manning & Co., rubber 

boots .... 
J. H. Jones, repairing rubber 

boots .... 
Charles L. Underbill, black 

smithing 
A. M. Prescott, teaming . 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 
Robert Burlen, binding 
McDonnell Bros., advertising 
Somerville Journal Co., adver 

tising .... 
Lennon & Co., rods 
Edson Manfg. Co., repairing 

hose .... 
David W. Lewis, grate 
John E. Capen, drilling 
Willard B. Bryne, blasting 
Charles A. Mongan, labor 
George I. Shedd, car fares 
Fred E. Jones, inspector . 
L. H. Brown, carriage hire 
J. H. Thompson, carriage hire 
City of Boston, water 
City of Cambridge, five-ninths of 

expense cleaning Bridge-street 

sewer . . . . . 

Amounts carried forward . 



$8,678 75 


$28,644 2T 


13 91 




26 01 




7 86 




8 26 




52 14 




1 40 




7 50 




3 OO 




50 





40 50 



3 45 



8 


80 


1,275 


90 


63 


75 


9 


00 


36 


90 


24 


00 


53 


70 




95 


12 


00 


65 


06 


23 


40 


10 


00 


38 75 


17 


50 


3 


00 


13 


50 


40 


00 



1,217 47 



11,756 96 $28,644 27 



182 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . $11,756 96 $28,644 27 

Wiilard B. Bryne, constructing 

sewer in Broadway . . 662 95 

Wiilard B. Bryne, constructing 

sewer in Caldwell place . 188 10 

Wiilard B. Bryne, constructing 

sewer in Oilman terrace . 402 19 

Wiilard B. Bryne, constructing 

sewer in Oliver street . . 55 44 

Wiilard B. Bryne, constructing 

sewer in Olive avenue . , 6 16 

Wiilard B. Bryne, constructing 

sewer in private way off Pinck- 

ney street .... 169 66 

Wiilard B. Bryne, constructing 

sewer in Willow avenue . 2,465 27 

Christopher Burke, constructing 

sewer in Josephine avenue . 351 88 

Dennis C. Collins and T. F. 

Crimmings, constructing sewer 

in Paulina street and Broad- 
way . . . . . 3,417 96 
Dennis C. Collins and T. F. 

Crimmings, constructing sewer 

in private way off Dover street, 5 89 

Dennis C. Collins and T. F. 

Crimmings, constructing sewer 

in private way off Somerville 

avenue ..... 8 72" 

Richard Falvey, constructing 

sewer in Heath street 
Richard Falvey, constructing 

sewer in Somerville avenue . 
Richard Falvey, constructing 

sewer in Skehan street . 
Richard Falvey, constructing 

sewer in Melvin street . 

Amounts carried forivard . . $22,588 57 |28,644 2 



2,102 


06 


797 


62 


126 


53 


21 


18 


$22,588 


57 



$22,538 57 


$28,644 27 


9 69 




5 52 




364 13 




12 37 




145 38 




150 07 





APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 133 

Amounts brought forward 
Richard Falvey, constructing 

sewer in Winslow avenue 
Charles A, Mongan, construct- 
ing sewer in Atherton street 

and Beach street . 
Charles A. Mongan, constructing 

sewer in Browning road 
Charles A. Mongan, constructing 

sewer in Cambria street 
Charles A. Mongan, constructing 

sewer in Elm place 
Charles A. Mongan, constructing 

sewer in Harrison street 
Charles A. Mongan, constructing 

sewer in Harvard street . 212 13 

Charles A. Mongan, constructing 

sewer in Walter street and 

place ..... 521 62 

Charles A. Mongan, constructing 

sewer in White-street place . 170 26 

Charles A. Mongan, constructing 

sewer in Summer street . . 71 89 

C. S. Philbrick, overpayment on 

sewer ..... 12 21 

Reuben P, Benton, overpayment 

on sewer .... 15 08 

Henry Glover, overpayment on 

sewer . . . . . 8 23 

Sewer Assessments, private 

sewers assessed and abate- 
ments made .... 1,300 87 



$25,538 02 
Balance to credit in account 1893, 3,106 25 



$28,644 27 



134 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

SEWER ASSESSMENTS. 

Credit. 

Cash, received of sundry persons .... $12,212 70 

Balance to debit in account 1893 . . . 5,143 96 



Debit. 
Balance from 1891 . . . . $8,172 53 
Sewers, assessments levied . . . 9,184 13 



$17,356 66 



$17,356 66 



SIDEWALKS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed $10,000 00 

Cash, received of Patrick Nelson, pro- 
ceeds of sale of Winchester 
gravel land .... $200 00 

Highways account, sidewalks . 406 02 

Highways, paving Union square 
and parts of Somerville and 
Webster avenues, circle . 11 52 

617 54 



Sidewalk assessments, assessments levied . 10,219 04 
Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit of ac- 
count . 43 99 



Debit. 
Cash, paid laborers .... $5,107 50 
Jeremiah McCarthy, edgestones, 8,211 50 

Sewers account, edgestones . 94 33 

Highways, paving Union square 
and parts of Somerville and 
Webster avenues, edgestones, 202 19 



$20,880 57 



Amounts carried forward . . $13,615 52 $20,^>80 57 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



135 



Amounts brought Jorward 


113,615 52 $20,880 57 


John Thresher, bricks 


2,286 40 


W. A. Sanborn, bricks 


2,159 84 


The Porter Edmands Ice Co., 




sand . . . . . 


161 40 


A. Allen, sand . . . . 


29 25 


Highways account, sand, etc. 


2,045 15 


Somerville Journal Co., adver- 




tising , . . . . 


117 88 


Citizen Publishing Co., advertis- 




ing . . . . . 


66 00 


McDonnell Brothers, advertis- 




ing .... 


80 12 


John F. Elkins, teaming 


10 00 


George McKenna, teaming 


25 00 


T. F. Crimmings, teaming 


20 00 


Christopher Burke, teaming 


50 00 


Frank Buttimer, teaming . 


25 00 


Thomas Allen, teaming 


15 00 


John Ducey, teaming 


20 00 


Henry Gray, teaming 


20 00 


Owen Cunningham, teaming 


10 00 


Martin Gill, teaming . 


5 00 


A. Parker, circles 


79 77 


Walter Bates, concreting . 


39 24 



$20,880 57 



SIDEWALK ASSESSMENTS. 

Credit. 

Cash, received of sundry persons assessments . 
Balance to debit in account 1893 , 

Debit. 
Balance from 1891 .... $3,585 43 
Sidewalks, assessments levied . 10,219 04 



$8,233 47 
5,571 00 

$13,804 47 



$13,804 47 



136 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

STATE AID. 

Credit. 

State of Massachusetts, amount paid in 1892 charged 

to State $6,771 00 

Debit. 
Cash, paid monthly pay rolls . ^ . . . . $6,771 00 

STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount assessed .... $27,457 50 

Debit. 
Cash, paid State Treasurer, State tax . . . $27,457 50 



STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS, INDIGENT SOLDIERS AND 
SAILORS. 

Credit. 

Cash, received of State Treasurer .... $432 50 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1892, due from State Dec. 10, 1893, 573 00 





$1,005 50 


$418 50 




587 00 


$1,005 50 





Debit. 
Balance trom 1891 . . . . 
Indigent Soldiers and Sailors, one-half 
of amount paid in 1892 , 



STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS, BURIAL OF INDIGENT SOL- 
DIERS AND SAILORS. 

Credit. 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1892, due from State Dec. 10, 1893, $175 00 

Debit. 
Balance from 1891 .... $87 50 

Relief and Burial of Indigent Soldiers 
and Sailors, one-half of amount 
paid in 1892 .... 87 50 

$175 00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 137 



STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS, STATE AID. 

Credit. 

Cash, received of State Treasurer .... $6,581 50 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1892, due from State Dec. 10, 1893, 6,669 50 



Debit. 
Balance from 1891 .... $5,480 00 
State Aid, amount paid in 1892 . . 6,77100 



$12,251 00 



$12,251 00 



STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS, METROPOLITAN SEWER. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount assessed .... $3,136 02 

Debit. 
Cash, paid State Treasurer, assessment of 1892 , $3,136 02 



STREET LIGHTS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $27,000 00 

Debit. 

Cash, paid Somerville Electric Light 

Co., lighting .... $26,327 15 

Wheeler Reflector Co., lighting, ^ 42 90 

McDonnell Bros., advertising . 5 40 

Citizen Publishing Co., adver- 
tising . . . . 4 75 

Somerville Journal Co., adver- 
tising ..... 8 25 



Amounts carried forward . . $26,388 45 $27,000 00 



138 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 

L. H. Brown, carriage hire 

Sturtevant Bros., carriage hire . 

Martin O'Shaughnessy, moving 
lampposts .... 

Charlestown Gas & Electric Co., 
moving lampposts 

F. A. Chandler, moving lamp- 
posts . . . . . 

Patrick O'Connell, moving lamp- 
posts . . 

M. G. Staples, moving lamp- 
posts ..... 

C. A. Southwick, moving lamp- 
posts . . . . . 

Charlestown Gas Co., labor 

Somerville Electric Light Co., 
mast arm .... 



$26,529 45 
Excess and Deficiency, balance 

to credit of account . . 470 55 



f 26,388 45 f 27,000 00 
40 50 
6 00 


3 


00 


6 


00 




00 


18 


25 


10 


75 


4 

35 


50 
00 


10 


00 



$27,000 00 



SUNDRY PERSONS. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1891 . . ..... $16260 

Sundries, coupons not paid .... 415 00 



Debit. 

Cash, paid sundry persons amounts 

due them .... $127 50 

Balanceto credit in account 1893, 450 10 



$577 60 



$577 60 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



139 



SUPPORT OE POOR. 



Credit. 



Appropriations, amount assessed 

Cash, received for support of paupers 

Of Slate of Massachusetts 
Of City of Boston . 
Of City of Cambridge . 
Of City of Gloucester 
Of City of Lowell . 
Of City of New Bedford 
Of City of Newburyport 
Of City of Waltham 
Of City of Woburn 
Of Town of Arlington 
Of Town of Lexington 
Of Town of Milford 
Of Town of Revere 
Of Town of Sandwich 
Of Town of Stoneham 
Of State of Massachusetts 
burial of State paupers 
John C. Harris, aid furnished 
Estate of Edward Riley, aid fur- 
nished .... 
N. C. Woodman, aid furnished 
T. W. Kaan, guardian, aid fur- 
nished . 
John Mcintosh, aid furnished 
J. A. Sawyer, admr., aid fur 

nished .... 
Walter E. Rowe, aid furnished 
F. H. Mixon, aid furnished 
Ann Morris, aid furnished 
Thomas Garvin, land on South 
street .... 

Amounts carried forward . 



$886 48 
276 54 
119 80 

4 85 
28 00 
61 73 

2 00 
15 00 
23 75 

2 00 
72 00 

8 95 
70 75 

4 00 
52 32 

72 50 
169 92 

150 00 

200 00 

42 71 
25 56 

15 00 
8 00 
6 00_ 
2 00 

460 00 



$14,000 00 



$2,779 86 $14,000 00 



140 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
New Jersey City Insurance Com- 
pany, insurance on South- 
street property 
George Mulvey, money not called 
for ..... 



52,779 86 


$14,000 00 


300 00 




20 04 






3,099 90 






$17,099 90 



Debit. 



Cash, paid for support of paupers : — 




Commonwealth of Massachu- 




setts 


$910 16 


Massachusetts School for the 




Eeeble-minded 


587 27 


Worcester Lunatic Hospital 


2,152 31 


Worcester Insane Asylum 


963 47 


Westboro Insane Hospital 


679 72 


Taunton Lunatic Hospital 


163 07 


Danvers Lunatic Hospital 


1,351 83 


Northampton Lunatic Hospital, 


106 32 


House of the Angel Guardian 


184 00 


Carney Hospital 


157 14 


Children's Hospital . 




36 00 


City of Boston . 




866 55 


City of Cambridge 




31 17 


City of Chelsea . 




12 00 


City of Maiden . 




157 42 


City of Salem 




26 42 


City of Woburn 




40 86 


Town of Chelmsford 




141 31 


Town of Medford 




436 51 


Town of Natick 




4 12 


Town of Peabody 




475 95 


Town of Raynham 




104 00 


Town of Revere 




108 64 


Amounts carried forward . 


$9,696 24 $17,099 90 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT, 



141 



Amounts brought forward 
Mary Burke, rent 
Sarah Blake, rent 
Julia Casey, rent 
Ellen Driscoll, rent 
E. H. Elliot, rent 
Thomas Flemming, rent 
Lydia H, Fisher, rent 
Edward Foster, rent . 
Sarah Gill, rent . 
Charles Heath, rent . 
John McGonagle, rent 
Bridget Maher, rent . 
Mary O'Hare, rent . 
Emily E. Rice, rent . 
Mary Schultz, rent 
Maurice Terry, rent . 
A. E. Viles, executor, rent 
William Waters, rent 
James Ambrose, rent 
Antoi A'costa, rent . 
Michael Conlan, rent 
Morris Barry, board . 
George Clapp, board 
Preston Cheney, board 
Catherine Cronin, board 
M. J. De Aviller, board 
C- H. Dunbar, board 
Philip Eberle, board . 
Catherine Earle, board 
Mary Furnald, board 
William A. Green, board 
Margaret Guthroe, board 
Charles Hutchinson, board 
Ann Kelley, board 
Joseph Lafferty, board 
Mary Mahoney, board 

Amounts carried forward .' 



$9,696 24 


72 


00 


45 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


72 


00 


54 


00 


104 


59 


24 


00 


72 


00 


22 


50 


72 00 


60 


00 


36 


00 


24 


00 


60 


00 


20 


00 


60 


00 


10 


00 


14 


00 


^ 24 


00 


72 


00 


104 


59 


169 


92 


169 


92 


96 


00 


10 


00 


156 


86 


120 


00 


27 


75 


6 


00 


2 


75 


5 


00 


52 


28- 


104 


59 


54 


29 


62 


18 


111,852 46 



f 17,099 90 



f 17,099 90 



142 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 

George Mulvey, board 

Hannah M. Mayo, board . 

Kate McNerney, board 

Ellen M. O'Donnell, board 

Hannah Remick, board 

Datie G. Sawin, board 

J„ L. Sanborn, board 

Lizzie Trainor, rent . 

William S. Ward, groceries and 
provisions .... 

Sturtevant Bros., groceries and 
provisions .... 

Sawyer & Read, groceries and 
provisions .... 

Medford-street Market, groceries 
and provisions 

R. T. Burr, groceries and pro- 
visions ..... 

N. E. Rand, groceries and pro- 
visions ..... 

D. E. Watson, groceries and pro- 
visions ..... 

Charles S. Butters, groceries and 
provisions .... 

A. F. Carpenter, groceries and 
provisions .... 

A. L. Knowles, groceries and 
provisions .... 

C. A. Small, groceries and pro- 
visions ..... 

G. H. Hills & Co., groceries and 
provisions .... 

A. Munroe, groceries and pro- 
visions ..... 

F. H. Turner & Co., groceries 
and provisions 

Amounts carried forward . 



$11,852 46 $17,099 90 

20 04 

169 91 

55 57 

104 59 

32 85 

52 32 

7 00 

14 87 


272 00 


234 


00 


207 


80 


111 


00 


151 


50 


85 


50 


84 


50 


90 


00 


67 


50 


47 


00 


36 


00 


47 


86 


72 


00 


19 44 


$13,835 71 $17,099 90 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 143 

Amounts brought forward . $13,835 71 f 17,099 90 

J. B. Eastman, groceries and pro- 
visions ..... 16 00 

James Bartley, groceries and pro- 
visions . . . . . 10 00 

W. P. Blanchard, groceries and 

provisions .... 8 00 

Henry Gray, milk ... 16 01 

Ellen Quirk, milk ... 2 52 

John W. Henessey, milk . . 2 38 

A. Fiske, crackers . . . 18 72 

J. H. Brooks, dry goods . . 29 57 

James W. Brine, dry goods . 5 50 

E. B. Bradshaw, dry goods . 4 00 
Philip Eberle, boots and shoes . 82 75 
J. H. Mongan, boots and shoes, 14 25 
W. J. Emerson, boots and shoes, 5 50 

F, W. Gilbert, boots and shoes . 4 75 
Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel, 546 03 
Jennie H. Graham, nursing . 45 00 
T. F. Poland, nursing . . 10 00 
A. E. Mann, services as under- 
taker . . ... 95 00 

William A. Flaherty, services as 

undertaker . . . . 70 00 

P. H. Rafferty, services as under- 
taker 45 00 

Horace D. Runey, services as 

undertaker . . . . 25 00 

John Ducey, services as under- 
taker 10 00 

Fred H. Mixon, stove . . 5 50 

Philip J. Fitzpatrick, repairs of 

furniture . . . . 11 00 

George W. Trefren, Jr., carpen- 
tering . . . . . 106 44 

Somerville Journal Co., printing, 32 00 



Amounts carried forward . . $15,056 63 $17,099 90 



144 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 

Aaron R. Gay, stationery . 

S. H. Libby, services as auc 

tioneer .... 
Howard Lowell, carriage hire 
L. H. Brown, carriage hire 
Brown & Smith, carriage hire 
Charles L. Viles, carriage hire 
C. C. Folsom, salary as agent 
C. C. Folsom, salary as secre 

tary . 
C. C. Folsom, disbursements 
Frank W. Kaan, salary as secre 

tary .... 
William D. Hayden, services 



Excess and Deficiency, balance 
to credit of account 



. $15,056 68 


$17,099 90 


26 


61 




23 


74 




29 


00 




28 


00 




3 


50 




7 


50 




1,500 


00 




20 


84 




76 


82 




229 


16 




14 


00 




$17,015 


30 




84 


60 


$17,099 90 



TAXES. 



Credit. 



Cash, received for taxes 


in 1886 . 


$42 00 




U ( 




" 1887 . 


66 96 




(( ( 




'' 1888 . 


186 80 




a i 




" 1889 . 


378 60 




(( (. 




*' 1890 . 


29,502 30 




U i 




" 1891 . 


109,551 70 




U ( 




'' 1892 . 


459,075 00 


$598,758 86 






Overlay and Abf 


itement 


• 






Abatements oi 


\ taxes ] 


n 1886 . 


$4,790 90 




u u 


u 


' 1887 . 


4,990 40 




(( ii 


ii. 

carried ^ 


" 1888 . 
forward . 


4,645 10 




Amounts 


$14,426 40 


$598,758 36 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



145 



Amounts brought forward 
-Abatements on taxes in 1889 . 
" " " '' 1890 . 

u w 1392 _ 

JBalance to debit in account 1893: — 

Being uncollected taxes of 1889 

" " 1890 



" 1891 

" 1892 



Debit. 
Balance from 1891 .... 

Appropriations, amounts assessed for 

current expenses . 
State of Massachusetts, amount 

assessed for State tax . 
State of Massachusetts, amount 

assessed for Metropolitan 

sewer ..... 
County of Middlesex, amount 

assessed for county tax . 
Overlay and Abatement, amount 

added by the assessors . 



$14,426 40 

5,796 10 

344 00 

1,529 10 

1,932 00 



$157 20 

13,204 20 

30,691 90 

135,350 50 



$205,827 26 



512,835 00 



27,457 50 



3,136 02 



30,657 03 



22,271 95 



$598,753 36 



24,027 60 



179,403 80 
$802,184 76 



502,184 76 



TEMPORARY LOANS. 

Credit. 
Balance from 1891 . . . .... 

Cash, borrowed by authority of the City Council on 

city notes, as follows, viz. : — 

Blake Brothers & Co., on seven 

months at 3>^ per cent. . $225,000 00 

Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, on four months, at 3^ 
per cent. .... 



50,000 00 



$238,000 00 



Amounts carried forward . 



$275,000 00 $238,000 00 



146 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . $275,000 00 $288,000 00 

Blake Brothers & Co., on twelve 

months, at 4 per cent. . . 78,000 00 

Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, on six months, at 4 
per cent 40,000 00 

Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, on six months, at 4^ 
per cent 60,000 00 



Debit. 
Cash, paid as follows : — 

Somerville Hospital, note dated 

April 13, 1891 
Nellie A. Hutchins, guardian, 

note dated April 13, 1891 
Nellie A. Hutchins, guardian 

note dated April 17, 1891 
Nellie A. Hutchins, guardian 

note dated Dec. 1,1891 
Commonwealth of Massachu 

setts, note dated Sept. 30 

1891 .... 
Commonwealth of Massachu 

sett, note dated Nov. 23 

1891 . . . 
Brewster, Cobb, & Estabrook 

note dated Dec. 1, 1891 
Blake Brothers & Co., notes 

dated March 30, 1892 . 
Balance to credit in account 1893 



$13,000 00 
10,000 00 
15,000 00 
30,000 00 

50,000 00 

100,000 00 

20,000 00 

225,000 00 
228,000 00 



453,000 00 



$691,000 00 



$691,000 oa 



WATERING STREETS. 

Credit, 

Appropriations, amount assessed 
Interest account, transferred 

AMount carried forward . 



$5,000 00 
200 00 

$5,200 00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



147 



Amount brought forward . 
Cash, received of abutters . 

Public Grounds account, water- 
ing 

Schoolhouse Incidentals account, 
watering .... 



Debit. 

Cash, paid N. C. Barker, overseeing 
Christopher JBurke, watering 
G. W. Cummings, watering 
Owen Cunningham, watering 
John Ducey, watering 
J. F. Elkins, watering 
Richard Falvey, watering 
Martin Gill, watering 
Henry Gray, watering 
George McKenna, watering 
Henry McAvoy, watering 
Jeremiah McCarthy, watering 
Philip McGovern, watering 
A. M. Prescott, watering . 
George W. Prichard, watering 
T. F. Reardon, watering . 
M. G, Staples, watering 
J. L. & H. K. Potter, watering 

cartj . , . . 
Seward Dodge, repairing carts 
L. A. Wright, repairing carts 
F. H. Flagg, repairing carts 
Charles W. Ingalls, repairing 

carts 
F. Dooris, repairing carts 
W. N. McCrillis, painting carts, 
Fred C. Fuller, building shed . 



$5,200 00 



$7,8'29 37 
71 01 
84 39 



$430 00 
369 00 
460 35 
442 35 
389 03 
378 00 
425 25 
453 60 
415 80 
439 20 
455 40 
383 86 
393 98 
532 58 
382 50 
365 85 
403 20 

1,015 00 
98 90 
42 25 
19 00 

4 50 

2 50 

102 00 

473 10 



7,984 77 



$13,184 77 



-Amounts carried forward . 



$8,877 20 $13,184 77 



148 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought fonvard 
Charles H. Tufts, painting shed, 
Boston Woven Hose & Rubber 

Co., hose .... 
W. E. Plumer & Co., rope 
Thomas Groom & Co., book 
Somerville Journal Co., printing, 
Smith & Robertson, premium of 

insurance .... 
City of Boston, water 
Howard Lowell, carriage hire . 
Highways account, paving 

$12,828 06 
Excess and Deficiency, balance 

to credit of account . . 356 71 



$8,877 


20 $13,184 77 


40 


00 


25 


30 




37 




60 


15 


25 


105 


00 


3,539 


84 


6 


00 


218 


50 



^3,184 77 



WATER LOAN INTEREST. 

Credit. 
Balance from 1891 . . . .... $5,15080 

Cash, received from City of Boston, water rates . 17,640 91 



Debit. 

Cash, paid on water loan debt: — 

$10,000, one year at 5^ per 

cent $550 00 

$116,500, one year at 5 per cent., 5,825 00 

$238,000, one year at 4 per cent., 9,520 00 



$15,895 00 
Less coupons unpaid . . 315 00 



$15,580 00 



2,791 71 



Amounts carried forward . . $15,580 00 $22,791 71 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 149 

Amounts brought forward . $15,580 00 $22,791 71 

Sundry persons, coupons unpaid, 315 00 

$15,895 00 
Reduction of Funded Debt, 

amount transferred . . 6,896 71 

$22,791 71 



WATER MAINTENANCE. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1891 .... $599 58 

City of Boston water rates, amount 

appropriated .... 20,000 00 

Water-works Extension, amount trans- 
ferred 9,000 00 



Water Services, transferred . . . $760 14 

Cash, received of North Packing & 
Provision Co., pipe, fittings, 
and labor .... 

John P. Squire & Co., pipe, fit- 
tings, and labor 

New England Dressed Meat & 
Wool Co., labor, teaming, etc., 

Somerville Iron Foundry Co., 
old iron ..... 

S. B. Locke & Co., old iron 

Town of Winchester, clamps 

Charles Harrington, pipe . 

L. W. Dow, manure . 



Debit. 
Cash, paid laborers . . . . 
Nathaniel Dennett, salary as 
superintendent 



$29,599 58 



Amounts carried forward . 



274 69 




460 72 




557 64 




54 50 

42 53 

9 00 

3 00 

12 00 


2,174 22 






$31,773 80 


$20,752 83 




1,500 00 




.$22,252 83 


$31,773 80 



150 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 

Disbursements 
Frank E. Merrill, salary as 

clerk .... 

Disbursements 
S. E. Hayden, salary as engineer 
Fulton O'Brion, grain 
A. M. Prescott, grain 

E. B. Vreeland, grain 
Seward Dodge, blacksmithing 

F. Dooris, blacksmithing . 
H. G. Collins, blacksmithing 
Charles Maguire, blacksmithing, 
E. Spalding, harness work 

Hill & Langtry, harness work 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
W. E. Plumer, hardware 
Richard Dowd, hardware . 
Howe & Flint, hardware . 
Charles A. Holmes, hardware 
W. I. Heald, hardware 
Miller & Shaw, machine work 
Jaques Brothers, pattern work 
Osgood & Hart, castings . 
Somerville Iron P'oundry, cast- 
ings .... 
Cunningham Iron Works, cast 

ings .... 

Chapman Valve Manfg. Co., fit- 
tings .... 
Henry R. Worthington, valves 
Boston Bolt Co., bolts 
Sewall & Day Cordage Co., pack 

ing .... 

Boston Lead Manfg. Co., lead 
George D. Goodrich, pipe 
Andrew J. Morse & Son, hose 



Amounts carried forward . . $26,515 27 



$22,252 83 $31,773 80 


107 


69 


900 


00 


10 


00 


1,100 


00 


257 


92 


79 98 


62 


50 


225 


86 


67 


25 


10 


30 


54 


88 


52 27 


34 75 


166 


04 


16 


04 


36 


85 


1 


50 


8 


22 


1 


35 


110 


16 


342 


06 


196 


09 



11 14 



1 20 



1 44 




25 84 




37 50 




8 39 




284 93 




11 81 




38 48 




$26,515 27 


$31,773 80 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



151 



Amounts brought forward 


. $26,515 27 $31,773 80 


A. J. Wilkinson & Co., tools 


26 10 


Perrin, Seamans, & Co., tools 


143 92 


Walworth Manfg. Co., tools 


66 36 


John B. Safford, tools 


12 00 


J. Baker & Co., tools 


9 00 


R. K. Carpenter, tools 


5 00 


Harry Hunt, tools 


6 00 


J. M. Ellis, mason work 


45 00 


John R. Thompson, carpenter 




ing .... 


39 98 


George W. Trefren, Jr., carpen 




tering .... 


1 05 


Fred Davis, whitewashing 


2 00 


James F. Davlin, plumbing 


61 04 


J. E. Parsons, plumbing 


27 00 


H. W. Covel], plumbing 


21 57 


Young & Maynard, plumbing 


6 72 


J. B. Dupont, plumbing 


5 58 


L. C. Seavey, slating 


5 04 


H. H. Harvey, steel . 


3 50 


Warren B. Plympton, polish 


2 15 


Robert Bishop, waste 


15 73 


Star Brass Manfg. Co., gauge 




glasses . . . . . 


5 52 


Curtis Regulator Co., regulator. 


135 00 


Union Gas Co., globes 


12 25 


Samuel Walker Oil Co., oil 


31 02 


William F. Low, oil . 


34 66 


Alden Spear's Sons & Co., oil . 


1 50 


Waldo Brothers, cement . 


96 85 


Berry & Ferguson, cement 


1 12 


T. F. Reardon, barrels 


3 00 


S. W. Fuller, lumber 


148 75 


John S. Rice & Co., copper pan, 


2 00 


A. W. Russell, brush 


3 00 


D. H. Smith & Son, canvas 


6 40 



Amounts carried forward . 



$27,501 08 $31,773 80 



152 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
Robert Miller & Co., awnings . 
H. W. Johns Manfg. Co., as- 
bestos . . . . . 
Olney Brothers, oil . 
D. J. Bennett, repairs on wagons, 
D. H. Brown, repairs on wagons, 
D. W. Crocker, repairs on 

wagons .... 
F. H. Flagg, repairs on wagons 
Boston Belting Co., packing 
Boston Woven Hose & Rubber 

Co., packing . 
Edson Manfg. Co., pump . 
J. B. Clisby, painting pump 
P. Fred King, painting stand 

pipe .... 
Charles F. Pond, painting 

hydrants 
P. J. Faunce, painting buggy 
J. Q. Twombly, glazing 
Henry K. Barnes, leather . 
Chelmsford Foundry Co., man 

ger .... 

Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel 
B. F. Wild & Co., fuel 
J. J. Underhill, fuel . 
J. McCarthy's Sons, charcoal 
John McCarthy, charcoal . 
H. C. Dodge, brush wood 
George C. Emerson, wood 
Charles Booth, wood 
Fresh Pond Ice Co., ice . 
Somerville Electric Light Co. 

lighting . . . . 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
City of Boston, water 

Amounts carried forward . 



$27,501 


08 $31,773 80 


8 


00 


11 


06 


28 


32 


54 40 


30 


05 


34 


50 


4 


00 


14 45 


2 


43 


17 


40 


30 


00 



127 38 



72 


75 


8 


00 


16 


60 


2 


55 


3 


00 


623 


78 


218 


26 


5 


00 


2 


65 ' 


5 


50 


5 


00 


6 


80 




50 


7 


15 


38 


53 


61 


36 


23 


80 


$28,964 30 $31,773 80 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



15a 



Amounts brought forward 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., rentals and tolls 
Daniel Hoar, Jr., teaming 
Owen Cunningham, teaming 
George W. Prichard, teaming 
John F. Elkins, teaming 
T. F. Crimmings, teaming 
Charles Faulkner, teaming 
Somerville Journal Co., printing, 
Citizen Publishing Co., printing, 

F. W. Barry, Beale, & Co., sta- 
tionery ..... 

Cutter, Tower, & Co., stationery, 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery, 

W. A. Greenough & Co., direc- 
tory ..... 

Sampson, Murdock, & Co., direc- 
tory .... 

Fitchburg Railroad Co., labor 

W. B. Bryne, labor . 

J. W. Cook, use of horse . 

J. H. Brooks, dry goods . 

Philip Eberle, boots . 

G. W. Ladd, bags 
William H. Brine, cot 
Thomas Hollis, sponges . 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., repair 

ing chairs . . . 
S. J. Wood, keys, etc. 
Martin Gill, plowing 
Charles R. Simpson, veterinary 

services .... 
Smith Premier Type Writer Co., 

typewriter 
Barker & Tibbetts Express, ex 

pressing 

Amounts carried forward . 



$28,964 30 $31,773 80. 

263 30 
531 00 

22 50 
187 50 
220 00 

67 50 
34 25 
11 00 

9 00 

9 55 

1 50 

68 53 

2 00 

5 00 
41 00 

3 00 
9 00 

6 79 

3 00 
60 

5 75 
2 00 

1 65 

4 75 
10 00 

2 00 
100 00 

55 



$30,587 02 $31,773 80 



154 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 

E. R. Perham, expressing . 

Charles E. Farnham, expressing, 

Thorpe's Express, expressing . 

William S. Ward, compensation 
for damages . 

James Bartley, meal . 

Crane & Woods, premium of in- 
surance ..... 



Balance to credit in account 1893, 



$30,587 02 


$31,773 80 


1 05 




1 05 




15 




3 70 




16 90 




80 00 




$30,689 87 




1,083 93 






$31,773 80 





WATER SERVICES. 



Credit. 



Cash, received of William H. Ralph 

pipe, fittings, etc. . 
L. R. Mace, pipe, fittings, etc. 
James Barrett, pipe, fittings, etc. 
E. R. Christopher, pipe, fittings 

etc. .... 

McGovern & Kitch, pipe, fittings 

etc. .... 

Commonwealth of Massachu 

setts, pipe, fittings, etc. . 
J. W. McDonald, pipe, fittings 

etc. .... 

William H. Bancroft, pipe, fit 

tings, etc. 
Wilbur P. Rice, pipe, fittings 

etc. .... 

Benjamin Hadley, pipe, fittings 

etc. .... 

J. A. Durell, pipe, fittings, etc. 

Amount carried forward . 





$31 60 




20 00 




17 70 


, 


18 60 


, 


15 95 


l- 


39 40 


, 


18 00 




16 80 


, 


3 30 




6 00 




1 00 



$188 35 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



155 



Amount brought forward . 
McLean Asylum, pipe, fittings 

etc. .... 

F. G. Hawes, pipe, fittings, etc. 
David A. Sanborn, pipe, fittings 

etc. . . 

D. W. Gage, pipe, fittings, etc. 
N. H. Reed, pipe, fittings, etc. 
R. H. Sturtevant, pipe, fittings 

etc. .... 

Thaddeus Maloy, pipe, fittings 

etc. .... 

D. Deaddy, pipe, fittings, etc. 

Water Service Assessments, cost 
of services laid 

Debit. 
Cash, paid laborers . . . 
Sumner & Goodwin, fittings 
Perrin, Seamans, & Co., fittings 
George K. Paul & Co., fittings 
Fred H. Holton & Co., fittings 
Boston Lead Manfg. Co., pipe 
New England Water Pipe Co. 

pipe .... 
Boston Bolt Co., castings . 
Somerville Iron Foundry, ser 

vice boxes 
Boston Belting Co., washers 
Boston Woven Hose & Rubber 

Co., washers . 
Chapman Valve Mfg. Co., gates 
Walworth Manfg. Co., tools 
Andrew J. Morse & Son, tools 
Waldo Brothers, cement . 
Stoughton Rubber Co., mitts 

Amounts carried forward . 



$188 35 

53 20 

16 10 

28 05 
13 15 
11 20 

17 15 

13 75 
36 50 

$377 45 
10,177 55 



. $4,714 65 


$10,555^00 


1,159 63 




1,591 22 




377 48 




53 17 




297 47 




\ 29 69 




33 44 




951 44 




15 75 




r 

7 28 




40 79 




40 96 




1 25 




50 00 




10 12 




. $9,374 34 


$10,555 00 



156 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward 
Charles I.. Underbill, repairing 

wagon ..... 
Charles Maguire, blacksmithing, 
Fulton O'Brion, grain 
G. W. Ladd, grain 
Frank Hall, horse 
Bradley, Hastings, & Co., shade, 
Somerville Journal Co., printing, 
Globe Gas Light Co., torch 
H. W. Covell & Co., plumbing . 
J. E. Parsons, plumbing 
Philip Eberle, boots . 
Mary Harrington, abatement of 

water service assessment . 17 20 

Charles A. Pratt, abatement of 

water service assessment . 27 10 

Hudson & Lewis, abatement of 

water service assessment . 30 80 



$9,374 


34 $10,555 00 


37 


35 


6 


50 


136 


06 


22 


50 


100 


00 


5 


00 


3 


50 


4 


45 


11 


56 


9 


50 


10 


00 



$9,794 86 



Water Maintenance, balance 

transferred .... 760 14 



$10,555 00 



WATER SERVICE ASSESSMENTS. 

Credit. 

Cash, received of sundry persons, water services . $11,094 50 

Balance to debit in account 1893 .... 1,722 00 



Debit. 
Balance from 1891 .... $2,638 95 
Water Services, service pipes laid in 

1893 10,177 55 



$12,816 50 



12.816 50 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 157 

WATER-WORKS EXTENSION. 

Credit. 
Balance from 1891 .... 
City of Boston water rates, amount ap- 
propriated - . 

Cash, received of N. E. Dressed Meat 
& Wool Co., pipe, fittings, etc., 

North Packing & Provision Co., 
pipe, fittings, etc. . 

John P. Squire & Co., pipe, fit- 
tings, etc. . . . 



Debit. 
Cash, paid laborers .... 

Boston Lead Manfg. Co., lead . 

Davis & Farnum Manfg. Co., 
pipe, fittings, etc. . 

Peet Valve Company, valves, etc., 

Somerville Iron Foundry, cast- 
ings 

Osgood & Hart, castings . 

Boston Bolt Co., castings . 

Holyoke Hydrant & Iron Works, 

hydrants, etc. . . . 2,086 83 

The Pratt & Cady C'o., hydrants, 
etc. ..... 

Walworth Manfg. Co., gates, etc., 

Chapman Valve Manfg. Co., 
valves, etc. .... 

Donaldson Iron Co., pipe 

McNeal Pipe & Foundry Co., 
pipe . . . . . 

George K. Paul & Co., pipe 



14,423 41 




40,000 00 


144,423 41 




$1,412 30 




69 40 




779 77 


9 961 47 




Zi, ^VJJL 1 1 




$46,684 88 


$4,589 24 
2,750 80 




2,659 62 
1,904 80 




524 73 

968 08 
7 56 





238 


00 


602 


30 


431 


51 


18,678 


14 


965 


94 


110 


21 



Amounts carried forward . . $30,517 26 $46,684 88 



158 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought Jorward 
Perrin, Seamans, & Co., packing, 
Sewall & Day Cordage Co., pack 

ing .... 

Charles Maguire, horseshoeing 
Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing 
Seward Dodge, blacksmithing 
F. Dooris, blacksmithing . 
F. W. Leavitt, blacksmithing 
Nathan Tufts & Sons, grain 
A. M. Prescott, grain 
Boston & Maine Railroad, labor 
Daniel Hoar, Jr., teaming 
George F. McKenna, teaming 
Charles Faulkner, caravan and 

teaming . . 

George A. Richards, teaming 
George W. Prichard, teaming 
T, F. Crimmings, teaming 
Richard Falvey, teaming . 



$37,124 64 
Water Maintenance, amount 

transferred .... 9,000 00 

Balance to credit in account 1893, 560 24 



. $36,517 


26 


22 


43 


3 


60 


8 


25 


7 


00 


30 


35 


20 


30 


62 


25 


22 


50 


17 


20 


16 


00 


144 


00 


53 


00 


136 


00 


12 


00 


10 


00 


37 


50 


5 


00 



f46,684i8S 



$46,684|88 



-APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



159 



TABLE D. 



BALANCES DECEMBER 31, 1892. 



Cash . 

City Loan Bonds 
Public Library . 
Public Property 

Real-Estate Liens 

■Sewer Assessments 

Sidewalk Assessments 

State of Massachusetts, Indigent 

Soldiers and Sailors 
State of Massachusetts, Burial of 

■Indigent Soldiers and Sailors, 
State of Massachusetts, State 

Aid 

Taxes . . . . . 

Water Service Assessments 
Funded Debt . . . . 
Highways, paving Union square 

and parts of Somerville and 

Webster avenues . 
Nathan Tufts Park 
Overlay and Abatement . 
Overplus on Tax Sales 
Property and Debt Balance 
Reduction of Funded Debt 
Schoolhouse in Ward Two, 

Prospect Hill District . 
Schoolhouse, Edgerly Addition, 
Semi-Centennial Celebration 
Sewers . . . 
Sundry Persons 

Temporary Loans . . . 
Water Maintenance . 
Water-works Extension 



$89,653 03 

53,000 00 

335 44 

1,752,351 58 

888 40 
5,143 96 
5,571 00 

573 00 

175 00 

6,669 50 

179,403 80 

1,722 00 



[,194,500 00 



4,102 09 

3,408 55 

2,402 74 

102 13 

557,851 58 

40,081 71 

890 00 
8,782 50 

164 89 
3,106 25 

450 10 

228,000 00 

1,083 93 

560 24 



$2,045,486 71 $2,045,486 71 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, March 22, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, March 15, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports,^ 

in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1892. 



Hon. WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio, 
ISAIAH H. WILEY, President of the Common Council, ex officio. 



MEMBERS. 

WARD ONE. 

HORACE C. WHITE, M. D., 149 Perkins Street 
SANFORD HANSCOM, M. D., 1 Webster Street 
S. NEWTON CUTLER, 28 Flint Street 



Term expires 1892. 
1893. 
1894 



WARD TWO. 

JAMES F. BEARD, 17 Prospect Hill Avenue 
THOMAS M. DURELL, M. D., 23 Bow Street 
ALVAH B. DEARBORN, M. D., 34 Bow Street 



Term expires 1892. 

1893. 

" 1894. 



WARD THREE. 

Q. E. DICKERMAN, 85 Central Street 
HELEN J. SANBORN, 383 Broadway 
NORMAN W. BINGHAM, 235 School Street 



Term expires 1892. 
1893. 
1894. 



WARD FOUR. 

GILES W. BRYANT, M. D., 396 Highland Avenue 

MARTIN W. CARR, 74 Craigie Street 

Prof. BENJAMIN G. BROWN, 38 Professors' Row 



Term expires 1892. 
1893. 
1894. 



C. E. MELENEY, Superintendent and Secretary, 40 Greenville Street. 
Office, 4 Walnut Street. Office hours from 4 to 5 P. M., each day that the 
schools are in session. 



STANDING COMMITTEES, 1892. 



High School — MussKS. DICKERMAN, BEARD, DURELL, WHITE, CUTLER, CARR, 
BROWN, BINGHAM. 

Schools i7i East Somerville District. — Messrs. HANSCOM, WHITE, WILEY, CUTLER. 

Schools in Prospect Hill District.— Mrssrs. DURELL, BEARD, DEARBORN, 

Schools in Winter Hill District. - Miss SANBORN, Mr. BINGHAM, Mayor HODGKINS, 

Mr. DICKERMAN. 

Schools in Spring- Hill District. — MESSRS. CARR, BRYANT, BROWN. 

Schools in IVest Somerville District. — MussRS. BRYANT, BROWN, CARR. 

Rides and Regulations. —M.KSSRS. BRYANT, DICKERMAN, CUTLER. 

Finance. -MESSRS. CARR, HANSCOM, WILEY, BEARD. 

Additional School A ccommodatio7is. — 'MAYOK HODGKINS, Messrs. HANSCOM, DURELL, 

Miss SANBORN, Mr. CARR. 

Repairs.— Messrs. WHITE, BRYANT, BINGHAM, BEARD. 

S 7ippl ies. —Mrssrs. BINGHAM, CARR, DURELL, WHITE. 

Text -Books.— Messrs. HANSCOM, CARR. Miss SANBORN, Messrs. WHITE, DURELL, 
BEARD, DICKERMAN. 

hidzistrial Education. — Mr. BEARD, Miss SANBORN, Messrs. CARR, CUTLER, 
DICKERMAN 

Music — M\ss SANBORN, Messrs. HANSCOM, CARR, DEARBORN. 

Examinationof Teachers. — Messrs. BROWN, DICKERMAN, HANSCOM. 

Salaries.— Messrs. CUTLER, BINGHAM, DEARBORN, BROWN. 

Evening Schools. -Messrs. DURELL, DICKERMAN, HANSCOM, CARR. 

Exami7iation 0/ Ninth Class. — Messrs. DICKERMAN, BEARD. 

Exa7iiinatio7i of Eighth Class. — Messrs. WHITE, CARR. 

Examination of Seventh Class. — Mr. CUTLER, Miss SANBORN. 

Examijiationof Sixth Class. — Messrs. DURELL, DICKERMAN. 

Exaninationof Fifth Class.— Messrs. BINGHAM, BROWN. 

r.xamination of Fourth Class. — Messrs. DEARBORN, HANSCOM, BRYANT. 

','rivate Schools. — Messrs. DEARBORN, BRYANT, WILEY. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1893. 



Hon. WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 
FRED W. GILBERT, President of the Common Council, ex officio. 



MEMBERS. 



WARD ONE. 

SANFORD HANSCOM, M. D., 1 Webster Street 
S. NEWTON CUTLER, 28 Flint Street 
GEORGE S. POOLE, 46 Mt. Vernon Street 



January. 

Term expires 1894. 

1895. 

1896. 



WARD TWO. 

THOMAS M. DURELL, M. D., 23 Bow Street 
ALVAH B. DEARBORN, M. D., 34 Bow Street 
HERBERT A. CHAPIN, 10 Putnam Street 



Term expires 1894. 
1895. 
1896. 



WARD THREE. 

HELEN J. SANBORN, 383 Broadway 
NORMAN W. BINGHAM, 235 School Street 
Q. E. DICKERMAN, 85 Central Street 



Term expires 1894. 
1895. 
1896. 



WARD FOUR. 

MARTIN* W. CARR, 74 Craigie Street 

Prof. BENJAMIN G. BROWN, 38 Professors' Row 

GILES W. BRYANT, M. D., 396 Highland Avenue 



Term expires 1894. 
1895, 
1896. 



CLARENCE E. MELENEY, Superintendent and Secretary, 40 Greenville Street. 

Office, 4 Walnut Street. Office hours from 4 to 5 P. M., each day that the 
schools are in session. 



STANDING COMMITTEES, 1893. 



High School. — yiKSARS. CUTLER, BROWN, CARR, DURELL, BINGHAM, DEARBORN, 
HANSCOM, DICKERMAN. 

Schools in East Somervllle District. —MussR?,. CUTLER, POOLE, HANSCOM. 

Schools in Prospect Hill District. —M^?.s.K5. DEARBORN, CHAPIN, DURELL, GILBERT. 

Schools in Winter Hill District. —Mks?,^?,. BINGHAM, DICKERMAN, Mayor HODGKINS, 

Miss SANBORN. 

Schools in Spring Hill District. — Messrs. CARR, BRYANT, BROWN. 

Schools in West Somerville District. —Messrs. BROWN, BRYANT, ' CARR. 

Rules and Regulat ions.— yiK^s^s. DICKERMAN, CUTLER,^BRYANT. 

Finance. —M.HSSKS. CARR, POOLE, GILBERT, CHAPIN. 

Additional School Accommodatiojts. —MxYOR HODGKINS, Messrs. CUTLER, DEARBORN, 

BINGHAM, CARR. 

Repairs. — M-Esk^s. BRYANT, BINGHAM, POOLE, CHAPIN. 

Supplies.— Mk^sks. DURELL, POOLE, BRYANT, BINGHAM. 

Text-Books. — ^ROFR?,'=,OK BROWN, Miss SANBORN, Messrs. DURELL, CUTLER, DEAR- 
BORN, DICKERMAN, HANSCOM. 

Industrial Education.— Miss SANBORN, Messrs. CARR, CUTLER, DICKERMAN^ 
CHAPIN. 

Music — TAkssrs, HANSCOM, BRYANT, DEARBORN, Miss SANBORN. 

Examination of Teachers. — M.KSSRS. DEARBORN, DICKERMAN, BROWN. 

Salaries. — MESSRS. BINGHAM, DURELL, BROWN, CUTLER. 

Evening Schools. —M.KSSRS. HANSCOM, DICKERMAN, BRYANT, DURELL. • 

Examination of Ninth Class. — Messrs. POOLE, BROWN. 

Examination of Eighth Class. —M.ISS SANBORN, Mr. CUTLER. 

Examinationof Seventh Class.— Me-s^rs. DICKERMAN, DURELL. 

Examination of Sixth Class.— Mkssrs. BROWN, BINGHAM. 

Examination of Fifth Class. — M.KSSR?,. DEARBORN, BRYANT. 

Examination of Fourth Class.— Mkssr^. CHAPIN, DICKERMAN. 

Private Schools. — Mkssrs. CHAPIN, BRYANT, GILBERT. 



SUPERINTENDENT'SREPORT. 



To the School Committee oj the City of Somerville : — 

Ladies and Gentlemen, — A report of the public schools for 
the year 1892 is herewith respectfully submitted, it being the twenty- 
iirst annual report of the superintendent of schools of this city. 

Summary of statistics : — 



Population of the city. United States census, 1890 . 
Number of persons in the city between five and fif- 
teen years of age in May last . . . . 



East Somerville District 
Prospect Hill District . 
Winter Hill District 
Spring Hill District 
West Somerville District 

Total . . 



1,358 
2,665 
1,127 

1,083 
958 

7,191 



Increase 
within year. 

100 

62 
111 

47 
71 



391 



Number between eight and fourteen years of age 



Whole number of different pupils reg 

schools .... 
Average whole number belonging 
Average attendance 
Valuation of the city May 1, 1891 

Real estate .... 

Personal estate 
Rate of taxation .... 
Estimated value of school property 



istered in the 



40,117 
7,191 



$34,950,800 00 
3,142,300 00 



4,446 

9,120 
7,035 
6,608 
$38,093,100 00 



.015 

$636,725 68 



168 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Expenditures by the school board .... $121,255 62 

Teachers' salaries . . . $108,058 81 

Salaries of officers . . . 3,750 00 

Books, supplies, water, and light . 9,446 81 

Expenditures by the city government ... . . 46,155 16^ 

Janitors' salaries ! . . . 9,794 92 

. Puel . . . . . . 7,147 68 

Buildings and improvements . 11,478 38 
Repairs, etc. ( Schoolhouse Inci- 
dentals account ) . . . 17,734 18 

Total expenditures 1167,410 78 



REVIEW OF THE MINUTES. 



The new board organized with a new mayor in the chair, William 
H. Hodgkins, who had been a member twelve years ago by virtue of 
being the president of the Common Council. He greeted here sev- 
eral who had been his former associates on the School Board, either 
having been in continuous membership or former members. His 
words of hearty sympathy with the work of education and his ear- 
nest determination to exert all possible effort for the good of the 
schools were an inspiration. Mr. Cutler was returned by Ward One ; 
Mr. Bingham, by Ward Three. President Wiley, of the Council, and 
Dr. Dearborn, of Ward Two, were the only new members, as Ward 
Four returned, after an absence of three years, our old friend, Pro- 
fessor Brown, who was warmly welcomed by all. 

At the first meeting the superintendent, as usual, named the 
subjects likely to come up for consideration during the year. 

The subject of school accommodations was early considered by 
the board and the appropriate committee. At the January meeting- 
it was voted to request this committee to consider and report at the 
next meeting upon the needs of the East Somerville District, also to 
consider the advisability of adding four rooms to the Bingham School, 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 169 

In February the following report was presented and adopted : — 

1. That we renew and reinforce the report of the committee of 
1891, as follows : "That the City Government be requested to erect 
immediately a schoolhouse, suitably arranged and furnished, for an 
English High School, provided also with accommodations for the 
department of industrial education, together with a hall sufficiently 

large for graduating exercises, etc." 

2. In view of the rapid growth of the East Somerville District 
in the neighborhood of the Edgerly and Davis schools, it is recom- 
mended that the board request the City Council to build an addition 
of four rooms to the Edgerly building as soon as possible. There 
are twenty-four legitimate schoolrooms in the district, which will 
accommodate 1,200 children, fifty to a room. There were in Decem- 
ber 1,319 pupils in attendance, or 119 more than can be properly 
accommodated. This has necessitated the employment of seven 
assistants to teach in the over-crowded rooms. It is probable that 
four rooms would be filled by January, 1893. The increase from 
1889 to 1890 was fifty; from 1890 to 1891, eighty-six. 

3. In 1891 a petition, signed by residents of Ward Four living 
south of the Fitchburg railroad, was received by the School Board, 
asking for a school in that neighborhood. In view of the growth of 
the Spring Hill District, which has necessitated the re-opening of the 
Beech-street School for the overflow of the Franklin School, your 
committee recommend additional accommodations as soon as 
possible for Ward Four. The increase in the Spring Hill District 
from 1889 to 1890 was ninety-five; from 1890 to 1891, seventy-three. 

At this meeting the question of the establishment of a two- 
session plan for the High School was brought to the consideration of 
the board. This subject became the foremost topic for three succes- 
sive meetings. In April a majority report was made to the effect 
that " the two-session plan would be detrimental to the interests of, 
and a lasting injury to, the school," and a minority report was pre- 
sented by Mr. Bingham in opposition, when a substitute resolution 
was offered, which received the unanimous vote of the board, as 
follows : "That, in the opinion of the School Board, the adoption of 
the two-session plan is not desirable, except as a possible temporary 
measure." The High School Committee continued to consider the 
subject, and in May the following scheme was unanimously adopted, 



170 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

which has now been in operation since September, it being expected 
that the membership of the school would be about 550 : — 

1. All the pupils who have work four periods each day, namely, 
the first and second classes and the college division of the third 
class, to come at eight and remain till twelve. This will probably 
number 250 pupils. 

2. The remaining 300, consisting of three sections of the third 
class and all of the fourth class, to be divided into relays of 150 each ; 
the first to come at eight and go at eleven ; the second to come at 
eleven and stay till two o'clock. 

This will provide for 400 pupils for four hours and 150 the last 
two hours; with only 300 on half time. 

It is proposed that during April, May, June, September,* and 
October the school keep from eight until two ; and the remaining 
months, November, December, January, February, and March, from 
half-past eight till two, the periods to be fifty minutes. Recess in the 
middle of the day (twenty minutes), to allow the first relay to go, and 
the second to enter. 

In March the Winter Hill District committee reported that by 
the opening of the Glines School it would be possible to vacate the 
Cedar-street School building, and they had arranged to make the 
transfer of teachers, pupils, and supplies on April 1. The board 
approved the plan, and the Spring Hill committee reported that in- 
asmuch as half of the pupils now in the Cedar-street School belonged 
to their district, and as the Burns School was greatly over-crowded, 
it would be necessary to keep the building open. The board accord- 
ingly gave power to the Spring Hill committee to take the building 
and make the required transfers. To enable the Spring Hill com- 
mittee to do this on April 1, the Winter Hill committee transferred 
Miss Alice Porter to the Glines School, and released Miss Boardman 
to the Spring Hill committee. Miss Boardman remained in charge 
of the building, taking second and third grades. Miss Lacy was then 
transferred from the Harvard to the vacant room in the Cedar-street, 
and took first grade. The school building is now full, Miss Lacy 
having first and second grades, and Miss Boardman third and fourth. 
The yard and the building, inside and out, have been put in better 
condition and renovated. The school has greatly improved, and to- 
day it appears and is one of our pleasantest schools. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 171 

In June the City Government decided to enlarge and improve the 
Edgerly School, and the classes were dismissed for the year on June 
16. The committee on public property sent a communication to this 
board asking for a definite plan to relieve the crowded condition of 
schools in Ward Four, and at the June meeting the Spring Hill com- 
mittee presented the following scheme, which the board approved 
and sent to the City Government, viz. : That the Franklin School 
building be moved to a lot near the corner of Park street and Beacon 
street, renovated, rearranged, and provided with a good heating and 
ventilating system ; and that a new building be erected on the Beech- 
street lot after the purchase of a strip adjoining. 

At the Septemb(;r meeting, when it had become known that the 
City Government had done nothing to improve the ventilation of the 
High School, the board voted to send a request to the committee on 
public property that immediate steps be taken to introduce an effect- 
ive system of ventilation into the building. It is to be greatly 
regretted, however, that still nothing has been done in this important 
matter. 

The committee on repairs, knowing that, in consequence of the 
cramped condition of the finances of the department of public prop- 
erty, it would be useless to recommend the necessary repairs in the 
school buildings, confined their report to the request that the build- 
ings be properly cleaned and the walls and ceilings whitened and 
painted, a very reasonable and seasonable request, which in some 
cases has been complied with. 

The next subject in time and in importance was the finances. 
Early in February the several committees who are responsible for 
school expenditures made careful investigation of the needs of their 
respective departments for the year and returned to the finance com- 
mittee their demands. The finance committee at the February meet- 
ing reported the following recommendation, which was adopted by the 
board : that the City Government be requested to make the following 
appropriation for the current year, viz. : — 

For School Teachers' Salaries . ... ,. $125,00000 
For School Contingent (salaries of officers and jani- 
tors, $12,900 ; supplies, $15,500) . . . 28,400 00 



$153,400 00 



172 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

In March the superintendent reported the appropriation made 
by the City Government, and explained what would have to be done 
in order to meet the situation, and showed that it would be impossible 
to get through with the funds appropriated. In reply, the whole 
situation was explained by his honor the mayor in a simple and 
straightforward manner, to the entire satisfaction of the board. In 
October the mayor sent a communication to the effect that the 
school contingent appropriation had been exhausted, and that no 
more bills could be approved by him till additional appropriations 
had been made; and the superintendent presented a financial 
statement, which the board referred to the finance committee, 
with directions to forward to the City Government a statement 
of the present condition and needs, and request that transfers 
be made from other accounts to the credit of the teachers' salary 
account and the school contingent. The following is the statement 
made by them : — 

Amount estimated by School Board as necessary for — 

Supplies •. . . . $15,500 00 

Salaries, including janitors' salaries .... 12,900 00 

Appropriation by City Government 
for salaries, not including jani- 
tors' . . . . * . $3,750 00 
Appropriation by City Government 

for supplies ... . . 9,250 00 



Total school contingent at dis- 
posal of School Board . . $13,000 00 
Expended to date and paid by city for supplies . 9,131 84 

Balance for supplies . . . .... 118 16 

Bills approved by School Board yet 

unpaid . . . . . $1,404 03 

Bills approved at October meeting, 162 19 

Bills payable not yet approved . 2,486 85 



$4,053 07 



This shows a deficiency of over $3,934.00, which, however, is 
less than the board estimated by over $2,300.00. This amount shows 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 173 

not an over-estimate, but the extent to which the committee on sup- 
plies has curtailed the expenses of the schools by restricting supplies. 
School teachers' salaries account : — 

Estimate of the School Board . .... $125,00000 

Appropriation by City Government .... 108,000 00 

Balance at date . . . . $24,942 74 

October pay-roll . . . . 12,628 50 

The balance after paying the October salaries will scarcely pay 
the salaries for one month, which will leave a deficiency of over 
$12,000.00 on this account. 

SCHOOL EXHIBITS. 

In the February meeting the superintendent reported that the 
committee on the observation of the city's semi-centennial had 
appointed the superintendent, Mr. Carr, and Mr. Dickerman a com- 
mittee to prepare a school exhibit as a feature of the celebration ; 
that several meetings had been held ; and that the committee recom- 
mended that such an exhibit be held. He also presented the subject 
of the Massachusetts exhibit at the World's Fair, and requested that 
a committee be appointed, explaining that whatever might be pre- 
pared for one might do to use for both occasions. The matter was 
referred to the committee on industrial education. Subsequently 
this committee reported, and the school exhibit was held June 17 and 
18 in the High School building. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

There have been some minor changes of the rules, as follows : — ■ 

April 25. 1. Section 3, Chapter IV. of the Rules (describing 
the duties of the finance committee ) was amended by adding after 
the word " supplies " in the sixth line the sentence, " They shall 
examine and approve the pay-rolls of all bills passed by the board." 

2. The following sentence was added to Section 2 of the same 
chapter: "They [/. ^., the committee on salaries] shall examine the 
pay rolls of salaries of all persons in the service of the school com- 
mittee and approve such as are found correct." 

November 28. Section 6 was added to Chapter VI. of the Rules, 
as follows : The district committees may at their discretion appoint 
assistant teachers in the primary and grammar schools having an 



174 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



average of over fifty-six pupils on the following schedule of salaries :—^ 



Per annum. 

First year for a teacher without experience or normal train- 
ing, as an observer or assistant . . . . . $ 00 

Second year for such teacher ...... 200 

Third year for such teacher . . . . . ' . 275 

Fourth year for such teacher . . . . . . 350 

Fifth and subsequent years . . . . . . 425 

First year for a Normal School graduate . . . . 275 

Second year for a Normal School graduate . . . . 350 

Third and subsequent years . . . . . . 425 

An experience of at least thirty weeks shall be required to 
constitute a year's work. 

' MUSIC. 

One of the most important acts of the School Board was the vote 
to appoint a director of music for the first four grades. Mrs. Gar- 
wood was elected at the May meeting to serve the city two days each 
week, visiting the schools and holding teachers' meetings. At the 
August meeting, on the request of Mr. Hadley, the work in the fifth 
grades was transferred from him to Mrs. Garwood. 

By vote of the board May 31, the Second Normal Music Reader 
was adopted for use in the fourth and fifth grades, to follow the First 
Reader in the second and third. 

TEACHERS. 

There have been twenty-one resignations of teachers, and thirty- 
seven appointments of new teachers. Five have been granted leave 
of absence. 

RESIGNATIONS, 1892. 

High School, Sarah F. Litchfield, June 27. 

Annie E. French, June 27. 

Josephine H. Short, Sept. 26. 
Prescott School, Emma F. Porter, April 25. 

Florence M. Morton, June 27. 
Edgerly School, Mrs. Addie L. Smith, June 27. 

Annie M. Elder, Dec. 27. 
L. V. Bell School, Gertrude E. Robbins, March 28. 

Grace P. Thomas, Oct. 31. ; 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



175 



O. S- Knapp School, 
Charles G. Pope School, 
Prospect Hill School, 
Forster School, 

Bingham School, 

Morse School, 

Franklin School, 
Highland School, 



Edgerly School, 
Cummings School, 
Morse School, 

Teacher of Music, 



Nellie A. Hamblin, May 31. 
Emily G. Arnold, June 27. 
Florence O. Bean, Oct. 31. 
Blanche E. Heard, Sept. 26. 
xVlinna L. Wentworth, Oct. 31. 
Hattie L. Devereux, May 31. 
Laura C. Buddy, Oct. 31. 
Anna Pushee, June 27. 
Ella G. Worden, Nov. 28. 
Emmeline C. Summerhayes, April 25, 
Harriet B. Sargent, June 27. 
Mary H. Knight, Nov. 28. 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE. 

• Lilla J. Pike, Oct. 31. 

Addie M. Brown, Sept. 26. 
Amy C. Hudson, June 27. 
Ella F. Gould, Oct. 31. 
S. Henry Hadley, Dec. 27. 



DIED 

June 17, 1892, 

ADA COWLES. 

For many years a faithful and beloved teacher of the East 

Somerville District. 



High School, 



NEW TEACHERS APPOINTED. 

Mary M. Kingsley, Jan. 25. 
Bertha L. Brown, Jan. 25. 
Mrs. Lena Gilbert, Nov. 28. 
Isabel G. Goldthwaite, Nov. 28. 

East Somerville District. 

Prescott School, Grace L. Shaw, May 31. 
Edgerly School, Annie E. Elder, Sept. 26. 

Clara B. Cutler, Sept. 26. 

Helen P. Bennett, Sept. 26. 

Etta Colburn, Oct. 31. 



176 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Prospect Hill District. 



L. V. Bell School, 



Vyra L. Tozier, Feb. 29. 

Ines M. Dernier, Feb. 29. 

Eula M. Byrns, Feb. 29. 

Grace P. Thomas, March 28. 
Webster School, Mary C. Friend, June 27. 

Charles G. Pope School, Florence A. Chaney, Feb. 29. 

Helen M. Freeman, Feb. 29. 

Ellen P. Longfellow, Feb. 29. 

Lydia E. Morrill, June 27. 

Jane Parker, Oct. 31. 

Grace Emerson, Sept. 26. 

Blanche Seabury, Sept. 26. 

Minnie Wiggins, June 27. 

Jeannette M. BiUings, Sept. 26. 



Prospect Hill School, 



Bennett School, 
Jackson School, 



Forster School, 
Bingham School, 



Morse School, 

Franklin School, 
Harvard School, 



Highland School, 



Winter Hill District. 

Jennie L. Thompson, Sept. 26. 
Lucy K. Hatch, Sept. 26. 
Grace Shorey, Oct. 31. 
Ruby A. Johnson, March 28. 
Belle J. Tifft, Oct. 3L 

Spri?2g Hill District. 

Mrs. Maria F. Hill, June 27. 
Annabel M. Perry, June 27. 
Ella M. Coops, May 31. 
Carrie A. Fowle, June 27. 

West Somerville District. 

Mabel A. Jepson, Feb. 29. 
Jennie S. Wescott, September 26. 
Agnes M. Ward, Dec. 27. 



SPECIAL TEACHERS. 



Drawing, Augusta L. Balch, Jan 11. 
Music, Mrs. Gish Garwood, May 3L 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 177 



SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

In a growing city like Somerville, after taking care of existing 
-schools, the most urgent need is a wise provision for the expansion 
and development of the system to meet the demands of increased 
population, and broader and higher ideas of practical education. 
Considerations of economy, and possibly other complications, have 
prevented the City Government from making the year 1892 memorable 
for schoolhouse construction, however memorable it may be in the 
history of America and the history of Somerville. The work of 
enlarging the Edgerly building was begun in June, and has not yet 
reached that stage in its progress that will enable me to describe its 
adaptability to the needs of the school. A recent report of the com- 
mittee on public property states that the ventilation of all the school 
buildings has been considered by the committee, and everything has 
been done that seemed feasible. I am sorry I have not the facts in 
my possession to enable me to concisely describe here just what 
school buildings have been investigated, or which have been improved 
in the matter of ventilation. It does not fall to the province of the 
School Board to have the responsibility of placing the school build- 
ings in a proper sanitary condition, and the committee on repairs does 
not usually make a report at this time. 

Six years ago there were 112 classrooms in twenty-one buildings ; 
now we have 149 rooms in twenty-three buildings ; two unoccupied 
rooms in the Brastow School, leaving 147 rooms in twenty-two 
buildings. We erected three new buildings and enlarged two old 
ones. By so doing we hoped to be able to surrender seven old build- 
ings, which had been pronounced unsuitable for school purposes; 
but the increase in population has made it necessary to occupy all 
the old buildings, except the Union and Brastow. I'he effort, there- 
fore, to replace old, unhealthy buildings with new and improved 
structures has not been accomplished. While some of the crowded 
districts have been relieved, others are still cramped for room. The 
schools of the Spring Hill District are more crowded than they were 
five years ago, though the Morse School has been enlarged and very 
much improved. The district not only occupies anew all the old 
buildings, but has recently taken in the Cedar-street School. The 
new rooms of the Highland School are already full, and the Lincoln 
was never so crowded as now. 



178 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

In Ward Three there has also been a great increase in the 
schools, the new Glines School using seven rooms, while the Bingham 
School has already outgrown the building. In East Somerville the 
Davis School is much too large for the building, and there is little- 
hope that the enlargement of the Edgerly will afford the necessarjr 
relief. There seems to be no indication that the schools in the Pros- 
pect Hill District will be able to accommodate the pupils of that, 
portion of the city, in view of the phenomenal demand for new 
tenements to accommodate the influx of operatives and their 
families for the new works of the New England Dressed Meat 
& Wool Company. 

As compared with the erection of school buildings, the city has- 
developed much faster in the construction of dwellings and in popu- 
lation. In 1886 the population was 30,000 ; the school population^ 
was 5,296; the school enrolment, 6,350 ; the number of dwellings, 
5,245. 

This year the population is estimated at 44,580 ; the school popu- 
lation, 7,190; the school enrolment, 9,120. In 1886 in the primary 
and grammar schools there were 44.7 pupils to a teacher on the aver- 
age, and now there are 47. 

To meet the growing demands of the city, there should be an in- 
crease of schoolrooms each year. The fact that no new rooms have 
been added this year will make the need still more urgent in 1893. 
The plan proposed by our committee on additional school accommo- 
dations for the Spring Hill District should be acted upon in some 
way by the new City Government, either by its adoption or its modi- 
fication upon some liberal scale. The request of the Winter Hill 
committee for an enlargement of the Bingham School must not remain 
unheeded. 

But the greatest need of the city educationally is a new English 
High School. This has been so persistently urged, and so elaborately 
set forth by the School Board in recent years, that it would seem un- 
necessary to repeat here the claims for such an institution and the 
pressing need for immediate action. It was gratifying to those in- 
terested in the matter, that the City Government, at least, discussed 
the subject, and that the committee on public property invited the: 
School Board to present the case at a hearing in February last. The 
High School committee and the committee on additional school ac- 
commodations responded to the invitation, and presented the subject 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 179 

forcibly and graphically. The argument for an English High School 
as summarized by the superintendent was in substance as follows : — 

"Our High School building was designed to accommodate from 
250 to 300 students and from six to eight teachers. , It has grown to 
a school of over 530 pupils, and, with the hall cut into two classrooms, 
is arranged to allow ten teachers to work at one time, though we 
have now, in consequence of the absence of the principal, twelve 
teachers, — two being substitutes, — whom we employ by using the 
upper entry and the basement when the weather is mild. Before the 
principal was taken ill we had an average of fif*"y-three pupils to 
a teacher. Now we have forty-six per teacher. As compared with 
the high schools in the other cities of the State, this is a very large 
number — the average being twenty-seven pupils. 

'' We may expect that of the 380 pupils now in the ninth classes 
250 will ask for admission to the High School in September. The 
following year, which is the earliest date at which it is possible for a 
new school to be ready, there will be 290 seeking admission under 
the present unfavorable conditions. Under favorable conditions I 
•estimate that 320 pupils would seek admission to the High School in 
September, 1893. Of the total number then in the High School, — 
about 690, — I estimate that 250 would be in the classical school 
and 440 in the English High. Something must be done immedi- 
ately to inaugurate a systematic work for relief. This building 
•cannot be done before September, 1893, and must be built during 
two administrations. By the beginning of 1893 at the furthest there 
'will be demands for more school accommodations in other parts of 
the city for the primary and grammar grades. Any delay, therefore, 
will either indefinitely postpone the erection of a high school or bury 
future administrations under an avalanche of imperative public im- 
provements. 

"From the last available city reports (1890) I find but two high 
schools outside of Boston larger than ours, viz., Worcester and 
Lowell. In Worcester they are now building a fine English high 
school, and in Lowell the school board has been trying for years 
to secure a new building. Cambridge and Lynn were in similar 
■condition until their schools were divided into classical and 
English. 

" A division of the High School is a necessity, on account of the 
3ack of room in the present building, and for educational reasons; 



180 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

viz., organization and instruction. Experience also shows tliat it 
should be divided by courses, and not numerically or geographically. 
As to the organization or administration, the massing of large num- 
bers under one roof or under one principal is a difficult matter, and 
its results are now seen in the breaking down of the principal of our 
High School. As to instruction, it is absolutely impossible to carry 
on a complete course of study in the branches now recognized as be- 
longing to an English high school in a school organized, equipped, 
and officered as a classical school. 

'•It has been asked, 'Why not enlarge the present building?' 
Because it would simply magnify the difficulties now existing in the 
two particulars just mentioned — organization and instruction. We 
do not want a larger school of the same sort ; we want an entirely- 
different one, except what would remain in the classical course. It 
would be impossible to organize a separate school in the new part or 
the old part, with two principals of co-ordinate powers; unless it 
could be done as the Boston Latin and English high are, on two 
opposite sides of a block. I am authorized to quote Mr. Baxter as 
saying that such a scheme should on no account be attempted. We 
cannot organize an English high school in the present building, or in 
any addition to be made to the present building. 

"What is an English high school? This subject, treated as it 
deserves, would require a lengthy article. I will briefly state what 
constitutes the courses in the schools now in existence, and add what 
is now being demanded and will in the near future become perma- 
nent: I. Complete and thorough course in language and literature, 
including grammar, rhetoric, composition, biography, and consider- 
able reading of classic English and some other modern language. 
2. Mathematics, including geometry, algebra, trigonometry, book- 
keeping, business arithmetic, etc. 3. History — United States, 
general, civil government. 4. Science, including elements of 
botany, zoology, physiology, physical geography, geology, astron- 
omy, and physics, including mechanics and electricity. 5. Drawing, 
mechanical and freehand. 6. Tool instruction, woodwork, joinery, 
pattern making, wood-turning, metal work. 7. Physical culture. 
Cooking is a part of thecourse in some schools. 

" Such a course differs from our present work in the substitution 
of certain studies for Latin and Greek, the introduction of drawing 
and manual training, the greater thoroughness of scientific studies,. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 181 

and especially in the method of work. This entire change of method, 
is the most distinguishing mark of the English high school, which, 
itself is a recent conception in education. The English high school 
of to-day and the future was not dreamed of when our High School 
building was erected. It is the extension downward of the institutes 
of technology and schools of science. Its method is known as the 
laboratory method, which characterizes all the work of the school. 
It calls for an entirely different equipment, rooms, furniture, appara- 
tus, etc., and in a large measure a corps of teachers having different 
aims, ideas, ^training, and experience. The school provides for elec- 
tives to meet varying talent, and recognizes the principle of individu- 
alism in education. It aims to cultivate all the powers of the pupil 
■ — to lay a good foundation and awaken an interest in lines of study 
adapted to the individual needs of each student. It does not claim 
to prepare for trades or business especially, but recognizes the claims 
of those who intend to enter these activities as equal to those who 
wish to take up the learned professions. In a word, the school aims 
to educate the child as broadly as his powers admit of at the present, 
instead of bending all its resources to preparing for future courses of 
study. It recognizes the principle that every boy and girl has a right- 
to an education commensurate with his powers, even if he is not look- 
ing forward to the classic walls of the college; and that there are 
lines of study and elements of knowledge capable of developing the 
highest intellectual powers in a person who may have no taste or apti- 
tude for Latin, Greek, and mathematics. 

"A look into a modern English high school building would give 
a better idea of the equipment and arrangement necessary than vol- 
umes of descriptions. I will simply state that there should be 
smaller study rooms than in our present building. There should be 
a large physical laboratory for individual work, adjoining an appara- 
tus room and a lecture room possibly ; a good chemical laboratory 
equipped for individual work, with the necessary storage and appara- 
tus room; a room for a botanical or mineralogical laboratory; a 
room for freehand and one for mechanical drawing. These and the 
wood-working' laboratory or metal room would have to be iitted up 
expressly for their peculiar work, and would probably be in use about 
all the time. There would have to be libraries for history, biography, 
and literature, with conveniences for study and research, in the rooma 
devoted to these branches, and one or two rooms for mathematics. 



182 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

" If this be true, — and a careful investigation should be made 
iDefore any plans are made, — it is evident that the present building 
could not be used as an English high school, and the necessary re- 
modelling would entail heavy expenses ; in fact, the rooms are not 
arranged to make it in any degree possible to accommodate such a 
school. The idea, therefore, of building a new classical school and 
-converting the present building into an English school would be 
irrational. We never could have what we want. Besides, the pres- 
ent building is only large enough for a school of 300 students, which 
is about what we might expect of a classical school ; whereas our 
English high school will number 400 or 500 students inside of five 
years, judging from the result of Lynn and Cambridge." 

The points made were amplified and reinforced by the members 
of the committees. 

As the High School increased considerably in September and 
there was no place for the pupils but the High School building, the 
committee formulated the plan, already described in the record of 
proceedings, which has been in operation since September. It is too 
early to judge of the success of the plan, as it would be manifestly 
improper to pass judgment upon a measure dictated by necessity 
and demanding time and confidence for its success. It is admitted 
to be a temporary expedient, and we are trying to accomplish the best 
results that can be under the circumstances. It is believed to be the 
best scheme that could be devised. 

The necessity for a new building still remains and calls still more 
loudly for consideration as the numbers increase. But the great 
urgency is not occasioned by the number of pupils. It is rather the 
need of another and far different school to satisfy the demands for 
an education more varied, more comprehensive, and more practical 
than that which the present outfit is capable of furnishing, and which 
it will always be impossible to accomplish except in a separate school, 
with all the necessary equipments of a separate school. 

SANITATION AND BUILDINGS. 

Three and four years ago the School Board gave a great deal of 
attention to the subject of ventilation. The condition of the school 
buildings was carefully investigated also by the committee on public 
property, in which we were aided and advised by the State inspectors. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. . 18^ 

As a result a very important, progressive, and systematic movement 
was made to improve the old buildings and to furnish all new schools. 
with the most approved systems. The arrangements in the Prescott, 
Forster, and Lincoln schools were completely changed. New systems- 
were put into the Morse and Highland schools when they were enlarged,, 
and into the Knapp, Pope, and Glines schools, the only new build- 
ings erected in that time. This was a most gratifying advance. This- 
year the Smith improved system is being put into the Edgerly. The 
High School and the Bell, of the large schools, as well as all the old 
wooden buildings, have for years been very unsatisfactory, and have 
caused much complaint. During this year the Webster has been sup- 
plied with two furnaces, but with no means of ventilation ; while the 
Franklin, Bennett, Jackson, Harvard, Beech, Spring Hill, and Cedar- 
street buildings are still heated by stoves. The Prospect Hill, 
Cummings, and Davis have furnaces, and the Burns and Bingham are 
heated by direct or indirect steam heat ; but none of these buildings 
have any means of ventilation other than the Vv'indows and doors. In 
the appendix will be found a table showing at a glance the means of 
heating and the condition of ventilation in all the buildings in the 
, city. 

It is very important that the good work so successfully begun 
should be continued. It is necessary to bring this matter to the 
attention of the City Government each successive year. The condi- 
tions are so bad in the old schools, that I am sure the buildings would 
be condemned by experts. I have refrained from calling the State 
inspectors to make examinations and reports, hoping that progress 
would continue as it had begun. I have also found that in some of 
the schools, where a great outlay has been made for ventilation, the 
apparatus is liable to fail of its object, because the janitors, either for 
lack of instruction or from indifference, neglect to supply an adequate 
amount of fresh air. I have frequently found the slides in the cold, 
air boxes entirely closed, allowing the furnaces to take the air from 
the cellar, or from some room on the first floor, impure air thus pass- 
ing down the register from a cold room to be warmed in the furnace 
and be supplied to a heated room upstairs. Too much care cannot 
be given to this matter, and the janitors need constant supervision inj 
this regard. 

The condition of the sanitaries at the Cedar-street and Beech- 
street schools was brought to the attention of the board of healthy 



184 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



and radical improvements have been inaugurated. In this matter it 
is hoped the board of health will continue their good offices. 

The work that ought to be done on our school buildings is Her- 
culean, it is beyond the means of the city to perform in one, two, or 
even three years, but something should be done each and every year, 
whether new buildings are put up or not. Besides the means of 
ventilation, which should be the first improvement, there is great need 
of cleaning and painting the interior walls and woodwork. For the 
sake of cleanliness and decency, for health and appearance, for the 
satisfaction of the teachers, and especially for educational influences, 
the cultivation of good taste, and the aesthetic and moral nature of 
the children, our schools should be models of cleanliness, neatness, 
comfort and good style. Dingy, cracked, patched, and stained walls 
should disappear under the brush of the artist painter. It would 
cost very little to paint the walls of the schoolrooms. If the City 
Government could realize the appreciation and enjoyment of the 
teachers and children whose rooms have been thus improved, they 
would immediately take steps to put every room in the city in repair. 
The influence upon the teaching will compensate the city for the 
expenditure. The culture of the children will in years to come 
doubly repay the community for the outlay. One of our best 
teachers, in debating whether to accept a position elsewhere of a 
more flattering and templing nature, decided to stay if her room 
would be repaired and painted. 

In this connection I am pleased to report that the teachers and 
friends of the Lincoln School formed an association to raise funds 
for the purpose of ornamenting the schoolrooms with works of art. 
Quite a sum was raised and a good beginning made, which I hope 
other districts will follow. The committee on public property were 
persuaded to paint the walls of the rooms, which was necessary before 
any works of art could be put in place. Hon. Edward Glines donated 
a large sum for the purchase of pictures for the Glines School, which 
now adorn the walls of all the rooms. It is to be regretted, however, 
that the walls of the building had not been painted ; to fully appre- 
ciate and fitly set forth the value of the pictures, the tinting of the 
walls is absolutely necessary. 

There is a great movement in New England, and other sections 
also, in the direction of art education, by means of the decorative and 
artistic finish of school buildings. The architect and artist are 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 185' 

exercising their silent, but potent, influence upon the minds of the 
public school pupils. The Journal of Education thus describes the 
work of Mr. Ross Turner and the Public School Art League: — 

"The first step was to place in the schoolroom — after explaining 
his desire and plans to the school officials, whose consent was gladly- 
given — a number of his private paintings and works in plaster ; what- 
ever, in effect, would add beauty and an artistic atmosphere to the 
school home. When this had been done, it was an easy matter to 
interest others, especially those whose children were in the public 
schools. Money was collected, photographs, and other objects were 
loaned, and the Phillips School, in a district where there was ample 
room for artistic training, was selected for the experiment. The com- 
mittee on public buildings was influenced, and the walls of one room 
were tinted in a quiet grayish tone, agreeable to the eye* After the 
committee in charge had arranged this room, a circular was issued, 
January, 1892, inviting citizens to its inspection. As a result of the 
interest thus created, the committee has been enabled to adorn sev- 
eral other rooms in this building and to make a beginning in other 
schools. 

" On Mr. Turner's invitation, a number of Boston men and women, 
friends of art and of the schools, visited Salem, and on their return 
work was begun for the schools of this city. Two rooms have been 
decorated by the league — one in the English High School and one 
in the Rice Primary School ; while the North End Mission is about to 
experience an innovation through the generosity of private individuals. 
The Girls' High School has for some time been a witness to the 
practical benefits of artistic surroundings in the schoolroom. 

" The Public School Art League of America was formed in the 
hope of unifying this movement, giving it strength, and aiding those 
who might otherwise have to undertake the work alone. 

" The purpose of this movement is to place school children during 
their formative years among beautified surroundings, so that while at 
their studies they may unconsciously absorb the influence of what is 
good in art, and learn to distinguish the good from the bad. With 
the growth of a generation whose taste had been thus developed we 
would have a public holding higher standards for all their sur- 
roundings. 

"The result need not be all unconscious. Children are inter- 



186 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

■ested in what is about them is the test of our natural science, and 
it is no less true in artistic surroundings. The white wall and the 
blackboard are valuable, it is true, for illustrating some points regard- 
ing the diffusion of light; but these scientific facts are no less truly- 
shown by walls which reflect the deep Pompeiian red or the soft buff, 
and by pictures which carry us back to the great artists of Florence 
and Venice, by white casts of the works of Phidias and others of the 
grandest of all handicraftsmen. We have for a thousand years been 
learning how to profit from the lessons of Greece and Rome, but we 
have neglected one of the most evident of all the lessons they have 
to teach. 

" The artists have already gone much more than half way in giv- 
ing an impetus to this movement. It is for the teachers to meet 
them and do all that can be done to help it on. To no one can it 
possibly mean so much as it will to the teachers. Others are work- 
ing for succeeding generations, for humanity embodied in young 
America. This is the teacher's work always, but in this case the 
teacher alone has the privilege of reaping from it personal profit. 
Can any one hesitate when the reward is a transfer from a bare-walled 
schoolroom, adorned with globe and reading or music chart, to a 
school home, with warmly tinted walls, lovely pictures, idealizing 
statuary, the influence of heroic and ennobling men, a beauty that 
shall become personified goodness ? '* 

SCHOOL EXHIBIT. 



In reviewing the work of the schools during the year I might take 
as an object lesson the exhibit of school work made at the High 
School building in connection with the semi-centennial celebration 
of the founding of Somerville. There very much of what is being 
done in the schools was displayed. The exhibit was an attempt to 
place before the public types of the daily work of the children. 
Much that was displayed was selected in this way, the rest was pre- 
pared for the occasion, and was in quality and scope typical. It was 
not simply an exhibit of the manual work of the schools, because the 
manual work necessitates preliminary intellectual work. In fact, it 
is impossible to separate manual from intellectual work. There must 
be observation and thought before expression, whether by language 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 1ST 

or by manual products. A large section of the exhibit was language 
work. The work was displayed in the hall and three large rooms of 
the High School. The whole exhibit was all the more satisfactory 
and gratifying because it was composed of voluntary contributions of 
the teachers. 

Of course, the drawing and color was pre-arranged, as no com- 
plete, systematic, graded exhibition could have been made without 
a preliminary plan, but the other work was contributed by those who 
had something to send, and exemplified the work done in every grade 
and every subject of instruction. 

The success of the exhibition is due to the principals and 
teachers. Committees were appointed to look after the exhibition in 
each subject. They talked the matter over and arranged and sys- 
tematized all the contributions made in their several departments, and 
made suggestions how best to bring out and mount the features of 
every grade of work. Their painstaking labor resulted in presenting 
one of the most important and attractive features of the semi-centen- 
nial. A feature of the programme which contributed materially to 
the success of the exercises of the occasion, though in no sense an 
exhibit of school work, was the chorus of eight hundred pupils, 
under the direction of Mr. S. Henry Hadley, our enthusiastic 
and popular music teacher. 

The arithmetic was represented by apparatus and material 
to illustrate the method of teaching fractions, mensuration, etc., and 
by drawings, tables, figures, and demonstrations of all the processes 
and subjects taught, and of the various drill exercises, in all grades 
from the first to the ninth. In connection with fractions, per- 
centage, and mensuration were some very good instrumental draw- 
ings of geometrical figures and problems, accompanied by develop- 
ments and card models of geometric solids. Mr. Wadsworth was 
chairman of the committee. 

The science was represented by collections of leaves, grasses, 
pressed flowers, twigs, bark, grains, seeds, and other vegetable 
products ; by minerals, illustrating various strata of the earth's crust, 
various soils, gravel, sand, rock, minerals, and metals ; by animal 
products, cases of insects in their various stages of development, — a 
beautiful moth was hatched during the exhibition ; and by drawings 
and written work on plants, animals, human physiology, physical, 
geography, astronomy, and natural philosophy. There were also 



188 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

some pieces of home-made apparatus, illustrating machines and 
mechanical forces, etc. The exhibits were taken from a number of 
schools from all parts of the city, and covered work done in all 
grades, from the primary to the High School. Collections were 
arranged in boxes on the desks and tables, specimens and draw- 
ings were mounted on charts, and much of the written work and 
drawing was bound. Mr. Andrews was chairman of the committee. 

The geography, history, and language work were arranged in 
three rows of mounted sheets on the wall, the geography in the 
highest row, the language at the bottom. So far as possible, this was 
graded from left to right on two sides of the largest room. 

Packages of composition work and other language exercises 
were to be seen on the tables. Every grade of the schools and every 
feature of the instruction and drill was exemplified. 

There was a good graded exhibit of penmanship illustrating the 
drill and the instruction in each of the grades. 

The maps made of wood, paper pulp, putty, cards, and cloth, 
and the map drawing, both in geography and history, were varied to 
represent the processes of instruction. Mr, Southworth was chair- 
man of the language committee ; Miss Wendell, of the history 
committee; Mr. Brainard, of the geography committee. 

The drawing was arranged by grades, in three rows of mounts ; 
one section contained working drawings, pictorial or object drawing, 
and historical ornament ; another a series of graded home drawings, 
done according to the children's own ideas ; another a graded set of 
sheets illustrating the course in mechanical drawing. The work was 
very creditable, and showed a marked degree of progress in this sub- 
ject. One section of small space was occupied by an exhibit of work 
in color, showing the course of color instruction and the designs 
made by pupils in colored paper. In connection with the draw- 
ing was a collection of articles made of paper, cards, wood, etc., 
from the drawings, indicating a feature of manual training which is 
suggested and inspired by the drawing course. Most of the things 
were made by the pupils at home, of their own free will. It indicates 
the natural bent and inclination of children to work with tools and 
construct things, a tendency that should always be taken advantage 
of in any system of schools. 

The kindergarten work included sewing, paper folding and cut- 
ting, and mat weaving, the colors being all of the standards used in 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 189 

the primary schools. This occupied a section of wall space. The 
clay work from the kindergarten and primary classes was arranged in 
sections, corresponding to the grades of drawing. All this work was, 
of course, organized and arranged by Miss Balch, our director of draw- 
ing, who deserves generous praise for her admirable work, for her 
artistic taste and judgment, and for her organizing ability. 

One corner was occupied by photographs of school buildings, 
classrooms, pupils at work, teachers and graduating classes, and 
classes in gymnastic exercises. This feature of the exhibit indicates 
the possibility of preserving for future reference .features of public 
school education that it might be desirable to perpetuate. Mr. 
Shattuck had charge of this department. 

There were three long tables of the products of the cooking 
class, including bread, cake, vegetables, meats, jellies, etc. The 
members of the class have taken a year's instruction at the North 
Bennett-street Industrial School, through the generosity of the board 
of managers. One lesson of two hours was given each week. The 
pupils were from the eighth grade of several schools. I regret to state 
that this opportunity could not have been given to us this year. 

The sewing exhibit occupied a room by itself, and was an 
exemplification of our course,, which covers the six grammar grades. 
Beside the mounted work there were large numbers of articles 
displayed on tables, which were the school and home work of the 
pupils of the several grades. 

It is gratifying to report that this course in sewing, which I 
need not here again describe, is practically our own, though developed 
from the work in Philadelphia, modified, graded, and amplified by our 
own teachers, and has been copied and adopted by several cities in our 
own State, which have introduced sewing into the schools since we 
began ; several cities which have had sewing a great many years have 
abandoned their old courses and adopted ours. I say this in no 
boastful spirit, but in justice to our teachers, who have been untiring 
in their service. 

The exhibit of the High School work was very creditable. It 
included collections of pressed flowers by the botany class, geometric 
drawing, historic ornament to illustrate the study of history, drawings 
done in connection with study of physics, chemistry, and physiology. 
There was a very fine collection of language work, souvenir calendars, 
and other interesting and artistic specimens of pen work and amateur 



190 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

photography, mostly done at home and in the fields, at the pupils' owm 
suggestion. 

While this description of the exhibit does not fully review the 
work done in the schools, in these particular features it will doubt- 
less suffice, inasmuch as I have more fully expressed my views and. 
described our instruction in former reports. 

In drawing I shall depend upon the report of Miss Balch. In< 
regard to physical training, I can only say that, so far as I have 
observed, the work is being done very creditably, and in some in- 
stances admirably. In some schools, particularly where there are new 
teachers, we have not kept up to the standard set us by Miss Living- 
stone. I am as confident of the success of our system, and as hope- 
ful of the best results, as when I made my last report ; but I see that 
it is impossible to do in the whole city what ought to be done, and 
get the results that the system is capable of producing, without a 
director. I recommend that some one well trained in the system be 
employed to hold teachers' meetings, and, if possible, supervise 
the schools. An occasional visit by one full of enthusiasm, as 
our first teacher was, and as helpful and suggestive, would make a 
wonderful difference in our schools. I hope the committee which has 
the department in charge will consider the matter at an early date. 

In reading we have not yet reached the results we hope some 
time to accomplish. The matter is under consideration, and has been 
presented to the teachers recently in an address by Superintendent 
Aldrich, of the State board of education. I need not repeat what I 
have said in former reports on this important subject, but will simply 
re-fer you to my report of 1890, on the subject of literature and read- 
ing. After treating of the educational value of reading and literature, 
I explained a system of circulating the reading matter already pro- 
vided, and recommended the addition of valuable books in literature, 
A scheme of circulation has been put into operation, but is unsatis- 
factory for want of a few more sets to complete the circuits, and the 
scant supply of books of literature, which is the most important sup- 
plementary reading matter. I believe nothing has been added to the 
list of supplementary reading this year, and no new sets have been 
purchased to facilitate circulation. In this connection I wish briefly 
to restate my earnest desire that more time be spent in reading 
history and biography. By far the most cultivating, enriching, and 
inspiring studies are the humanities, language, literature, history, 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 191 

and biography. Philosophers regard these as of the highest educa- 
tional value, and yet, except in the High School, the provision made 
in our curriculum for these studies is extremely limited. By means 
of a small appropriation each year, this department in the grammar 
schools might be well equipped for this important work. Some time 
ago I outlined for the committee on text-books a plan by which the 
schools might in time be furnished with libraries of choice reading, 
to be used in instruction, and as a means of silent culture through 
individual reading. I hope to have this important feature of the 
schools established at no distant day. My advocacy in former reports 
of class libraries is one I will not repeat, except to say that other 
cities are making a great advance in this particular. 

The call for a large supply of supplementary reading which we 
have been making for four or five years, and the necessity and plea 
for class libraries, is in harmony with the present widespread move- 
ment now felt in our neighboring cities for "enriching and enlarging 
the grammar school course of study." Though a progressive city 
educationally, our limited appropriations for supplies during the last 
two years has made it impossible for the committees to further this 
movement for better literature. 

Several cities in Massachusetts are experimenting with an ex- 
tended course of study for grammar schools. Much that is being 
done is in the right direction, some is empirical. Our conservatism 
will doubtless prevent a headlong plunge into anything not guaran- 
teed by the best authority and by successful experience ; there is no 
reason, however, to prevent a consideration of these questions, and a 
careful examination of the experiments now going on. It is a nota- 
ble fact that conferences of educators, councils of education, repre- 
sentative college professors, teachers of secondary schools, principals 
and teachers of elementary schools, are busily investigating and con- 
sidering these questions. I will not now take your time to discuss 
this matter, because I have already presented some phases of it in 
former reports. The question of educational values of studies, how- 
ever, is a highly important one, which it is our duty to carefully estimate. 

Looking forward to a gradual modification of Our curriculum, 
some of the principals have been testing the practicability of depart- 
mental teaching in the grammar classes. This is not a new idea, 
nor an untried experiment. Many successes have been made on this 
plan. Under certain conditions very efficient results may be accom- 



192 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

plished, but it is yet too early to report or to draw conclusions. We 
are feeling our way, and may have something to report in future. 
Another experiment that should be noted, but of which much cannot 
yet be said, is the organization of classes composed of pupils of sev- 
eral grades who are prepared, or who ought, to do special individual 
work between grades or beyond the grade. This gives evidence of 
great promise. Another important step in the right direction is the 
appointment of supernumerary teachers in schools where the classes 
are very large to give special instruction to individual pupils or 
sections. In former years part of this has been done by the 
principals. The value of such work cannot be over-estimated, and is 
worthy of careful attention. It need not be confined, as of late, to the 
primary classes, but under wise management may be very effective 
in the grammar grades as well. What I recommended last year in 
this matter may at an early day be tried. 

RELIEF FOR THE GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

The crowding of our grammar schools is becoming a very serious 
problem. The new buildings recently opened have helped very much 
to provide for the large classes, but never before has the work been 
so heavy in the grammar department. One mode of relief has been 
mentioned, but something more permanent and efficient needs to be 
done. I am thoroughly convinced that many of the pupils spend 
more time in the grammar classes than need be. For those who are 
qualified and inclined to take Jong years of study in higher institu- 
tions some provision should be made to shorten the grammar school 
course. None of these great educational questions can be considered 
without a thought of the High School. The relief of the grammar 
classes, the enlargement and enrichment of the grammar-school course, 
the introduction of special work, all depend upon the advantages 
offered in the High School and the room provided for High School 
pupils. 

All educational progress, as it now seems to me, is at a stand- 
still for the want of better facilities for a high-school education. 
The arguments put forward time and again by members of the board 
and others included the idea of making the High School an outlet 
for the crowded grammar schools. The present fourth class in the 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



193 



High School contains a number of pupils from the eighth grade of 
the Highland School. It is a notable fact that all who applied passed 
the examination successfully and have taken creditable rank in the 
High School. There are pupils in the other grammar schools who 
could liave done the same and saved a year in fitting for college. The 
practice could not be made general for lack of room, but if we had 
an English and a classical school, pupils might enter from the eighth 
and even the seventh grades, as is done in other cities. 

A very important and hopeful experiment is in progress in a 
neighboring city by which the large grammar schools have each two 
plans of organization and classification : at one pupils take the 
grammar-school course in the usual manner in six years, and at the 
other in four years ; in other words, the instruction is divided in one 
case into six portions, as it were, one-sixth to be done each year, and 
in the other the same amount of work is divided into four portions, one- 
fourth to be done each year. It is claimed that the same training 
and development is aiforaed in both courses, because the pupils who 
cover a certain amount of ground in four years are capable of higher 
culture and more rapid development. The experiment is one of great 
importance,and if after a careful trial it proves efficient, it will also 
prove what we have claimed for some time, that many pupils are kept 
too long on the grammar course. There have always been pupils in 
our schools who have completed the grammar course in less than six 
years; but by our method of annual promotions and distinct grades a 
year apart, it has been necessary for pupils frequently to skip an 
entire year's work in order to go over the whole in less than six years- 
There is no question that some system should be devised whereby 
the entire course may be completed without any breaks and skips 
in less than six years, if there are pupils capable of doing it. The ex- 
periment of ungraded classes which we have inaugurated is one way 
of solving this problem. 

Another method is also being tried, that of organizing a district 
in grades six months instead of a year apart. This is done in large 
schools by having two classes of a grade, one six months ahead of the 
other, and in small schools by having two sections of a grade in one 
room. This is not an untried experiment, having been used success- 
fully in many places. Never has there been more thought put upon 
the problems of how best to make the schools meet the wants of the 
children. The day is passing when the child has to be made to con- 



194 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

form to the machine. This is no age in which everything must bend 
to traditional systems, when individuality must be sacrificed to rou- 
tine and organization, when all the pupils of a grade must be either 
brought up or brought down to the average ; the progressive, the 
studious, the ambitious, the faithful pupils losing valuable hours, 
days, months, and years for the sake of classification, while the 
teachers drag up the slow and plodding pupils, who must be kept up 
to grade. 

THE AGE OF GRAMMAR-SCHOOL PUPILS. 

A committee of the New England Superintendents' Association 
has spent much time collecting data in regard to the time children 
take in passing through the grammar schools, and their ages at gradua- 
tion. Statistics were collected from all cities and towns in New Eng- 
land that have superintendents of schools. The returns from 104 
places have been formulated. The average age of the graduates of 
the grammar schools this year in thirty-eight cities of New England 
having a nine years' course of study was fifteen years, two months. 
That of our graduates was fifteen years, four months. In these 
thirty-eight cities, eighteen per cent, of the graduates were over six- 
teen years of age, fifteen per cent, were under fourteen, three per 
cent, completed the course of nine years in six years, six per cent, in 
seven years, nineteen per cent, in eight years, thirty-five per cent, in 
nine years, twenty-seven per cent, in ten years, and ten per cent, 
in more than ten years. In Somerville twenty-nine per cent, were 
over sixteen years of age at graduation from the grammar schools, 
eight and nine-tenths per cent, were under fourteen years. As to how 
many years each graduate took to complete the course, it was im- 
possible to report definitely, because many came from other places, 
though we know that two per cent, took six years in our schools, 
seven per cent, took seven years, nine per cent, took eight years, 
twenty-three per cent, took nine years, twenty per cent, took ten 
years, and the rest came from other places and cannot be classified. 
This shows that about eighteen per cent, of our pupils complete the 
primary and grammar grades in less than nine years, and twenty- 
three per cent, take nine years. If pupils are longer than nine years 
in passing through the grades below the High School, the reason 
should be investigated ; some causes are easily explained, but these 
do not answer all cases. The committee is pursuing inquiries further. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 195 

and will doubtless be able to throw some light on this important 
subject. 

The statistics thus far collected relate to the graduates of the 
grammar schools. We must remember that the ninth class numbers 
about six per cent, of the whole number of pupils in the nine 
grades, and that these average as high in scholarship as any. Last 
December the average age of the pupils in the ninth classes was 
fourteen years, ten and one-half months, but the average age of the 
lower classes is each proportionately higher ; for instance, the average 
age of the fourth class was ten years, three and one-half months, and 
that of the seventh class was thirteen years, two months. By this it 
is plain that pupils lose time in the lower grades of the schools. To 
ascertain the exact state of the case, I have collected reports from all 
the teachers of the ages of their pupils December 1, — that is, how 
many are five years old, how many six, seven, eight, etc., up to eigh- 
teen, — sothat I know just where the old pupils are. This summary 
will be found in the appendix with other statistics. My next problem 
is to ascertain why these individual pupils are in classes at an age 
when we might expect them to be further advanced. I have known 
for several years that our classes contain very many old pupils, and 
have determined the causes in many cases. Some of the reasons 
which I am prepared to report are these : — 

1. Late in entering school. People have an erroneous idea 
that the schools are not adapted to children five years of age, and so 
keep them out till they are six, seven, and sometimes eight years old, 

2. Some lose much by absences from sickness and other causes, 
some of it due to poverty and lack of nourishment and care at home. 
This cause I hope to investigate more thoroughly, and will refer to it 
in another connection further on. 

3. Some lose by transfer from other places where the course of 
study differs materially from our own. This cause should not exist. 
There should be sufficient uniformity to enable pupils to enter corre- 
sponding grades in neighboring cities. 

4. Many fail of promotion because they have not been taught ; 
several causes may operate to explain this more fully, — one is that 
there are too many pupils assigned to a teacher. Children waste 
precious time either doing nothing in school, or in doing what some 
call "busy work," but which leads to nothing ; has no educational or 



196 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

disciplinary value. It is commonly supposed that a good teacher can 
manage and teach fifty-six primary children. This is a delusion. No 
one can teach more than a small group at one time, and it is a mis- 
take to allow the other portion of the class to remain unemployed or 
without suitable direction in their work. To be sure, there are occu- 
pations that keep the little ones out of mischief while working by 
themselves ; yet there is a great deal of time wasted, no matter how 
skilful the teacher. I believe a teacher can accomplish more with 
sixty pupils in a year by having thirty for three hours in the morning 
and the other thirty for three hours in the afternoon than by hav- 
ing them all for five hours each day. I also believe that with thirty- 
five or forty, five hours daily, she can do immeasurably more than she 
can with fifty all day. Every class contains quite a percentage of 
dull or slow pupils, who have to be neglected while the teacher is 
occupied with the bright ones. I believe there is no time or 
expense saved by giving teachers large classes. It simply takes more 
years to do the work, or it is not done at all. For instance, if a man 
can do a piece of work represented by forty in eight days, it will take 
him ten days to do similar work represented by fifty, or it will take 
more men to do it in the same time. Therefore, if we give to one 
teacher more pupils than she can teach, it will take more years 
to do it, and there will be no saving in the long run ; whereas, if we 
give a teacher just as many as she can teach, they will get through 
school sooner, and we shall save the expense of instruction for the 
time gained. That is, the saving in time will be a saving of salaries, 
which may be paid to a larger number of teachers and the work will 
be done. 

5. Another explanation of the fact that there are many pupils in 
the several grades about the average age is that there has been 
no adequate provision for the pupils who are not prepared for promo- 
tion or who are promoted on trial, which you understand to mean 
being advanced to classes where they do not belong. This system 
clogs the wheels of progress and operates against the prepared as well 
as the unprepared. The remedy is to organize intermediate grades, 
where pupils may find their place. We are making progress in this 
direction, and I hope to see the day when it may be said that every 
child is in the class where he belongs and is doing just the work that 
his abilities enable him to do. To accomplish this requires more 
teachers and more elasticity in the work of the schools: but it will pay 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. ' 197 

in the long run. I here recall to your attention my report of last year 
on this subject. 

NEGLECTED CHILDREN. 

I have instituted inquiry into the home conditions of our poor 
children. Every one who enters upon investigations of this kind, 
even in a small and well-to-do city like ours, finds conditions that 
are revelations, to say the least. We find that much of the poor 
scholarship, irregular attendance, and bad behavior is due almost 
entirely to home life, or, rather, to neglect and abuse at home; pov- 
erty, ignorance, and bad morals, in addition to poor blood, as some 
call the child's inheritance of brains, is a large part of the explanation. 
Two classes of children fall under this inquiry: one, the teachable, 
who come under our instruction most of the time for several years; 
and second, the vicious, the truant, the neglected, and incorrigible. 
For the first class much more can be done at the public schools. 
They need the best schools and teachers we can give them for the 
regular school year, and they need vacation schools, which I have in 
former reports advocated, and which I believe would be a great sav- 
ing to the city. I will not weary you with a repetition of this argu- 
ment, as I have discussed it before. 

The second class need what the city of Boston, after years of 
deliberation and consideration, has decided to establish, viz., a 
parental school, where children may be taken and cared for and edu- 
cated. You have doubtless read the plan of such a school and its 
purpose. A proper care of these children would save later poverty 
and crime, with its attendant expense. I am not prepared to say that 
it is the duty of a city like Somerville to establish such a school, but 
I believe it at least the duty of the county or the State to provide 
adequate protection from abuse and poverty to the little helpless, 
innocent children, who are really the wards of the State. It would 
be economical for the State to make ample provision for these neg- 
lected children, and thus save the larger expense of crime, and the 
maintenance of courts and criminal institutions, to which these in- 
evitably grow up ; besides, the community would be the gainer from 
the fruits of honest toil to which the children might be reared. There 
is a time when the State has the right to take from the parent his 
neglected child, and fit him for a life of usefulness. It is also the 
duty of the State to protect itself from the invasion of ignorance and 



198 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

crime, which is constantly coming to our shores from foreign lands. 
Each year shows a larger proportion of foreign citizens. In self- 
defence, the State must use every endeavor first, to educate, our native 
born and raise them to the highest stage of civilization and useful- 
ness of which they are capable, then do all possible for the immi- 
grants. We are blind to our duty and blind to our danger, if we 
neglect any portion of our community. We shall be overwhelme d by 
the invasion of foreign ignorance if we do not rear here among our 
own people a generation of educated, industrious, moral, and cultured 
citizens. The State should do this, because it is to save the institu- 
tions of the State, because its benefits are to flow out to the State. 
Therefore, I would urge the importance of going to the legislature 
and asking that the State do something for our neglected classes. 

I am pleased to report that for years some of our schools have 
made it a practice to collect clothing for the needy, and to distribute 
it in homes where deserving people dwell. The truant officer has 
taken the distribution in hand, and much good has been don e. Chil- 
dren who otherwise could not attend school have thus been clothed. 
At Thanksgiving time the schools collect and distribute provisions, 
that cheer many a family that otherwise would suffer in want. I 
mean to push these inquiries to see if there cannot be som e way by 
which our children may be more regularly and more completely 
educated. Physical education is as essential as intellectual, but 
whether the city can feed as well as educate, is a question not for 
me to answer, though other countries, states, and cities have in 
some cases done so. Nourishment is a necessity : a good slice of 
bread might prove a preventive for many fits of temper and many 
unlearned lessons. 

The truant officer is aiding me very willingly in the investigation 
of the causes that lead to irregular attendance and bad behavior.. 
This is a great field for inquiry, and I am hopeful of getting down 
to causes the removal of which may greatly facilitate the develop- 
ment of true character and more ideal results in instruction. 

MUSIC. 

The one notable gain made during the year is the appointment 
of a music director for the first five grades of the schools. Music 
introduced last year in the primary grades made a fair beginning, but 
a decided improvement has now been instituted, which has inspired 




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REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 199 

confidence in all who are interested in this department of our schools. 
It is too early to report results. I am satisfied simply to say, that a 
good beginning has been made, and to submit Mrs. Garwood's 
report : — 

The aim of vocal music study in our public schools is to enable 
the pupils to sing at sight, — without the aid of an instrument, — a 
piece of music never seen before. This can be accomplished by the 
regular teacher. The same principles apply to the teaching of music 
as to any other branch. The work is graded, each class has a step 
in advance to take. The unit of tone study is the major scale, and 
the first step is to sing this scale, sing it till every step and half step 
is thoroughly learned, till the youngest pupils have mastered every 
interval, and tones are thought. After this has been done, give the 
representation, — " Do the thing first, give it a name afterward." The 
unit of time study is a visible sign, the swinging pendulum; and by 
the use of a system of "time names" applied to the swings of the 
pendulum, both power and length of tones are conveyed to the mind, 
and simple and complicated rhythms are understood and mastered 
by the pupil. The union of these two great principles, applied to 
carefully prepared exercises and songs, will produce such results as 
only this combination can. 

The primary work should be thoroughly done, in order that the 
advanced steps may be taken to good advantage. 

The work in the grammar grades will not show the results this 
year that will be possible when these classes have had the prepara- 
tory drill, and when the teachers better understand the object and 
the means of study by which the end is best attained. However, 
good faithful work is being done, and interest is growing, but time 
must be allowed, patience exercised, and the fact must be borne 
in mind, '''Tis one thing to know how a thing should be done, an- 
other thing to do it." Skill can only be gained by earnest, thought- 
ful effort; failures at first, success finally. 

The teachers have given me hearty co-operation, and their labor 
is appreciated ; for without their intelligent assistance my time would 
be uselessly spent. My part, then, is to plan work, instruct teachers 
in the theory, visit classes, hear them, see if they are being properly 
taught, take up a new step with them before the teacher, and thus 
have opportunity to see special needs, and give best help. 



200 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The teachers who comprehend methods of instruction can much 
more readily understand the normal course of music. 

When the subject is treated from a child's point of view, the 

delight of both teacher and pupils is manifest, and the study of 

music becomes one of the most enjoyable. The pupil is taught to 

observe, think, and then sing. There must be mental conception of 

both rhythm and time. If pupils understand the subject, and if 

they make intelligent and continued effort to learn to sing and 

to do whatever is required, they will succeed as surely as in any other 

case wherein nature gives results as a consequence of intelligent 

activity. I would respectfully ask that we be allotted a little more 

time to devote to the study of music. One hour and a half per week 

would be a great help to us. 

Very respectfully, 

GISH GARWOOD. 

SoMERViLLE, Mass., December, 1892. 



DEPARTMENT OF ART AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. 

This branch of our work was conducted for several months with- 
out a director, with a result described by the committee on drawing 
in the last year's report as follows : — 

" The experience of these few months has plainly shown that a 
supervisor is a necessity, in order to keep the work up to the standard 
it had already attained. This need is felt most among the new 
teachers, but in all grades, and especially in those above thepourth, 
where new work is now being taken up, supervision and instruction 
are necessary for the best results." 

It was found, also, that during the five months which followed 
Miss Herrick's resignation the work suffered considerably, not only 
on account of the inexperience of new teachers, who are constantly 
coming into the ranks, but also because in most of the grades the 
work is in the state of progression, and it will be a number of years 
before each class will be ready for the work systematically arranged 
for it in the course. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 201 

Miss Balch submits the following report and suggestions : — 

The present supervisor of drawing feels herself fortunate in 
being allowed to build on so good a foundation as that laid by her 
predecessor. Most of the teachers who worked with Miss Herrick 
have a fair knowledge of the elements of form study and drawing, 
and are able to teach these subjects successfully. 

In this paper it will not be necessary to speak very minutely 
of the details of the work, as these have been already dwelt upon in 
previous reports. Let us devote our attention more especially to the 
needs of our schools in the direction of art training. 

What are we doing to foster in our children a fine appreciation 
and love of the beautiful .? In literature, if this is done at all, it must 
be by putting before them the works of the best writers, even from a 
very early age. This is quite easy to do, but how about art, as 
applied to painting, drawing, and sculpture ? The works of the great 
masters we cannot have even for our homes, much less for our 
schools. Shall we then do nothing in the matter, because we cannot 
do the best .'' Many of the great masterpieces of art are reproduced 
by photography in such a way that, although the charm of the color- 
ing is lost, the beauties of form still remain. Might not these have 
some influence toward the culture of the higher nature of the child? 

It is true that even the largest reproductions are usually not 
large enough for the walls of the schoolroom. A picture which does 
very well for the home is entirely lost when hung in the schoolroom. 
It might be possible, however, if there were a demand for enlarged 
copies of the works of the great masters, that they could be supplied. 
Casts, also, reproducing some of the finest examples of sculpture, can 
be obtained at slight cost. 

It will be urged in answer to these statements, that even though 
the expense for each school should be small, yet the entire amount 
required will be considerably more than the School Board would feel 
justified in expending. This is quite true, and until the public feel 
the great importance of art training for our people, nothing need be 
expected in the way of an appropriation for this object. 

Meanwhile, there are doubtless many individuals who would 
be glad to bring more beauty into the lives of our children, and who 
feel that whatever is given for this purpose is very far from being 
lost. If a company of such persons could be formed and should take 
measures for establishing a fund for bringing art into the schoolroom, 



202 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

would it not be a glorious thing ? This fund might be placed in the 
hands of a committee competent to judge of suitable decoration in 
the way of wall finish, and also of appropriate pictures to place 
before children in the different grades. If this fcould be accom- 
plished, there would come an element into our teaching which is at 
the present time almost entirely lacking. For five hours in the day 
the children would be in the presence of that which tends to elevate 
and refine ; for, of course, only those examples would be selected which 
are universally acknowledged to be of the best. 

Another great need in our schools is color-teaching. Last year 
a few designs in colored paper were made in each class, and the 
results, as shown in our exhibit, were very pleasing. We need 
another and larger supply of this colored paper, as well as charts and 
tablets, so that the work may be systematically carried on in all our 
schools. The education of the color sense in children is of great 
importance, not only because the element of color enters so largely 
into the practical affairs of life, but also because a fine appreciation 
of harmony in color is a source of pure and exquisite pleasure, which 
tends to refine and uplift its possessor. 

In all our work in drawing during the year we have tried to 
encourage free expression on the part of the child. To aid in this 
he has been asked to illustrate little stories and poems read or told 
by the teacher, and also to make pictures at home of the things in 
which he is interested. It is hoped that the fostering of this natural 
desire for expression, combined with a systematic training in observ- 
ing and representing form, will result in making the pupil as ready to 
express his thought by drawing as he is by speaking or writing. 

Side by side with the acquiring of the language of form should 
go the training for the appreciation of that which is really good and 
beautiful in form and color, just as tht study of the language of words 
should be accompanied by the best in literature. 

We have no expectation that even with the most thorough, 
patient, and earnest teaching the average graduate of our schools 
will become either a poet or an artist, but we do most sincerely 
believe that all may be uplifted and refined, and that all may be led 
to a certain extent to appreciate and love the good and beautiful in 
literature and art. 

AUGUSTA L. BALCH, 

Supervisor oj Drawing. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 203 

TEACHERS. 

I wish to call your attention to the fact that we have appointed 
thirty-five new teachers since the last report. This means, as you 
know, that a great amount of time has been spent in looking up 
teachers, that progress in the schools has been retarded by constant 
changes in the teaching force, and that the time for supervision has 
been seriously interrupted. I am pleased to state that we have been 
able to secure good teachers, though some have declined our offers 
by reasons of inducements at home. 

The business of securing good teachers is a large and very im- 
portant one. It is well known that the supply is limited, audit is a 
serious question how and where to secure the best. Substitutes are 
also scarce. It is difficult to obtain assistants. The question of the 
training of teachers is forcibly brought to our attention, and I still 
believe that the board will sooner or later be obliged to take steps 
toward the establishment of a training school. 

GRADUATIONS. 

The graduating exercises of the High School took place at the 
First M. E. Church Tuesday morning, June 28th, and were much 
enjoyed by the large audipnce which assembled to witness them. 
At their close, His Honor Mayor Hodgkins presented diplomas to 
the eighty-two graduates.^ 

The following is the programme : — 

FORTIETH ANNUAL EXHIBITION OF THE SOMERVILLE HIGH 
SCHOOL, TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 1892, AT 9 A. M. 



ORDER OF EXERCISES. 

INVOCATION. Rev. George Skene: 

SINGING.*— Chorus: " Heaven and the Earth Display," 

from " Athalie." Mendelssohn, 

1. SALUTATORY IN LATIN. Gregory P. Baxter, 

2. ESSAY. Cotnposite Photography. - LuLIE May. 

3. READING. How Baby Paid the Mortgage. Amy B. Wheeler. 
SINGING. — Vocal March : " Song of the Sea." Veazie^ 

4. READING. Swan Song. Brooks. 

Carrie M. Lowell. 

* Singing accompanied by Hadley's Orchestra. 



204 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



5. Die Prinzessin. 

Ardelle Abbott, 
Blanche S. Bradford, 
Florence L. Davis, 
Grace Gay Fletcher, 
Jennie L. Jones, 

SINGING. — Air and Variations. 

Gertie L. Nickerson. 

6. ESSAY. A Timely Topic. 

7. From " King Henry IV., Part II." 

F. Marshall Jones, 
Fred R. Jouett, 
H. Wilder Lewis, 
Sarah L. Bradley, 

Bertha M 



Beatrice L. Miller, 
Minerva L. Mills, 
JosiE G. Owen, 
Kathleen E. Pillsbury, 
Ida M. Sawyer. 



Proch, 



John E. Le Bosquet. 

( Original version in Greek. ) 
Grace N. Brown, 
Ida p. Clough, 
Mary F. Goddard, 
Ethel M. Hayes, 
Stockbridge. 



SINGING. —Part-Song : "The Brownies." 

( Scored for orchestra by S. Henry Hadley.) 



recess. 



MUSIC. 



8. 
9. 



10. 
11. 

12. 

13. 
14. 
15. 

16. 



SINGING. — Choruses { for ladies' voices ) 

a. The Rustic Dance, (Gavotte.) 

b. Sanctus. ( Solo and Semi-Chorus.) 

ESSAY. " Fitting of Self to Its Sphere. " 

L'annee bissextile. 
Alice M. Beckley, 
Katherine C. Coveney, 
E. Maude Cushing, 
Mabel Derby, 
Ida E. Godfrey, « 

Louise W. Haskins, 
Laura W. Hawes, 
Alice M. Hoyt, 



Resch. 

H. K. Hadley. 

Hila H. Small. 



Edith M. Leighton, 
LuELLA Patch, 
Florence E. Prior, 
Ella L. Raymond, 
Almon W. Blake, 
William P. Cheney, 
Charles D. Solomon, 
Allan B. Souther. 



READING. Aunt Polly's George Washington. 



Marion West. 



Mabelle G. Dustin. 
Faniftg' 

fean Inge low. 



CLASS POEM. 

SINGING. — Chorus : Song of the Vikings. 

READING. Echo and the Ferry. 

Ida M. Remick. 

PROPHECIES. 

VALEDICTORY. 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS. 

By His Honor Mayor William H. Hodgkins. 
PARTING HYMN. Written by Mary F. Goddard. 



Charles H. Davis. 
Helen E. Harding. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



205 



MEMBERS OF THE GRADUATING CLASS, 



Ar^elle Abbott. 
Sadie Isabelle Baird. 
Alice May Beckley. 
Carrie Marie Borns. 
Blanche Stetson Bradford. 
Clara Butterworth. 
Edith Lewis Cole. 
Catherine Cecelia Coven«y. 
Etta Maude Gushing. 
Mabel Lydia Dadmun. 
Florence Louise Davis. 
Mabel Derby. 
Grace Moore Downing. 
Mabelle Gertrude Dustin. 
Grace Gay Fletcher. 
Ida Earle Godfrey. 
Maud Linwood Hadley. 
Florence Jane Harwood. 

* Louise Webber Haskins. 
Laura Willard Hawes. 
Lillian Haynes. 

Alice Maude Hoyt. 
Grace Pitman Jennings. 
Jennie Louise Jones. 
Grace Harvey Leach. 
Edith Mabel Leighton. 
Harriet Dean Lochman. 
Carrie Mabel Lowell. 
Beatrice Lillian Miller. 
Minerva Louise Mills. 
Alice Elizabeth Morang. 

* Gertie Louise Nickerson. 
Emily O'Brion. 

Josie Gertrude Owen. 
Luella Patch. 

Kathleen Elizabeth Pillsbury. 
Florence Emily Prior. 
Grace Lillian Proctor. 
Ella Louise Raymond. 
Ida May Remick. 
Ida May Sawyer. 
Susan Hamlin Stone. 
Luvia Anna Surrell. 



Marion West. 

Amy Bertina Wheeler. 

Robert Bowie Anderson. 
Charles William Berry. 
Almon Walter Blake. 
William Page Cheney. 
Francis Edward Doyle. 
James Edward Lewis. 
Ernest Johnson Loring. 
Edward Eugene McCarthy^ 
Karl Almon Pauly. 
Charles Douglas Solomon. 
Clifford Armstrong White. 

Course Preparatory to College, 

Gregory Paul Baxter. 
William Edward Cotter. 
Charles Henry Davis. 
Frederic Marshall Jones. 
Fred Robert Jouett. 
Herbert Leslie Kimball. 
Herschel Wilder Lewis. 
John Edwards Le Bosquet. 
Allan Bartlett Souther. 
George Alexander WoDd. 

Sarah Louise Bradley. 
Grace Nellie Brown, 
Ida Prescott Clough. 
Grace Hamilton Cooper, 
Ella Louise Daniels. 
Mary Frances Goddard. 
Helen Elizabeth Harding. 
Ethel Munroe Hayes. 
Blanche Evelyn Hosmer. 
Lulie May. 

Louise Frances Parkhurst. 
Edith Florence Poole. 
Mary Ethel Louise Pratt. 
Hila Helen Small. 
Bertha May Stockbridge. 
Angle Fletcher Wood. 



* Diploma not received on account of the omission of a part of the Course of Study. 



206 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Three hundred and sixty-eight of our pupils completed their 
grammar-school course in June, the exercises in honor of the event 
being held, as usual, in the First M. E. Church July 1st. The friends 
of the pupils and of the schools were present in large numbers. An 
interesting and appropriate address was given by the Rev. E. A. 
Horton, of Boston, music was rendered by the pupils in a manner 
creditable to themselves and their instructor, and the diplomas were 
presented by His Honor the Mayor, who first addressed the gradu- 
ates in a few w^ell-chosen words. 

The programme was as follows : — 

PROGRAMME. 



GRAND OPERA SELECTION — " II Trovatore." Verdi. 

Orchestra. 

SINGING.*— "Send Out Thy Light." Gounod. 

( Arranged for orchestra and organ by S. Henry Hadley.) 

Chorus. 
PRAYER. Rev. J. F. Lovering. 

SINGING. — Four-part Song. "The Dawnmg of the Day." Kallicooda. 

Chorus. 
ADDRESS. Rev. E. A. Horton, D. D. 

SINGING — Trio: "The Cuckoo." Heller. 

( Girls' Voices.) 
ADDRESS TO THE GRADUATES AND PRESENTATION 

OF DIPLOMAS. Mayor William H. Hodgkins. 

SINGING. -Glee: " Hark ! Apollo Strikes the Lyre." Bishop. 

Chorus, 

* Singing accompanied by Hadley's orchestra, under the direction of S. Henry Hadley, teacher of 
music in the schools. 



GRADUATES. 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 

Guy B. Aldrich. Percy E. Buck. 

Helen Edith Aldrich. Helen L. Burkett. 

George A. Bailey. Gertrude I. Burrows. 

Abbie S. Beck. Edward G. Clapham. 

Olive E. Brown. Amy L. Cole. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



207 



John F. Cole. 
Bessie L. L. Crosby. 
Joseph A. Dudley. 
Maude E. Dudley. 
Charles A. Foss. 
Cornelius J. Haley. 
Harry M. Handy. 
Grace A. Jackson. 
Mabelle C. Janvrin. 
George C. Jenkins. 
Perley W. Kimpton. 
Frank B. Knowles. 
Ernest F. Lanagan. 
Kate F. Leary. 
Lillian E. Leavitt. 
Josie A. Lemos. 



Mary Agnes Moore. 
Alberta R. Morgan. 
Jacob A. Phillips. 
Mary B, Reed. 
Louis H. Rowe. 
Eugene Russ. 
Percy W. Russell. 
Alice M. Saben. 
Ernest A. Taylor, 
Clarence H. Tingley. 
Hattie B. Toothaker. 
Edith A. Treadwell. 
Berton H. Walton. 
Margaret M. Waugh. 
Bertha L. Crowther. 



EDGERLY SCHOOL. 



K. Florence Baker. 
Roswell J. Bannon. 
Annie L. Bates. 
Maud G. Bearse. 
William F. Bearse. 
Lena A. Brackett. 
Eva R. Butler. 
Walter I. Chapman. 
Josephine M. Clark. 
George W. Clement. 
Florence A. Colgate. 
Bessie A. Conway. 
Ethel H. Curtice. 
James J. Fuller. 
Ella M. Furlong. 
James F. Gould. 
Benjamin D. Hammond. 
Leigh Hawes. 
Ernest W. Higgins. 
I. Grace Holbrook. 
L. Gertrude Hopkins. 
Ida B. Horton. 
Arthur H. Hutchinson. 
Minnie E. Jones. 
Charles L. Joslin. 



Gertrude C. Joslin. 
Ella O. Josselyn. 
Daniel A. Keefe. 
Loretta C. Lewis. 
Charles F. Liscomb. 
Edith F. Marshall. 
Ernest H. Marshall. 
James C. Maxner. 
Walter B. Morris. 
Roby A. Oram. 
L. Evelyn Pearson. 
Edith L. Pierce. 
Isabelle M. Porter. 
Abbie P. Pratt. 
Ella M. Shackley. 
Bertha L. Skinner. 
Blanche M. Smith. 
G. Frederick Smith. 
Origen S. C. Teague. 
Elsie B. Tuttle. 
George H. Tyler. 
Annie B. West. 
Alice G. Whittier. 
Ethel M. Wing. 



208 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



L. V. BELL SCHOOL. 



Edith M. Apted. 
Karl Burroughs. 
Eugene C. Clement. 
Grace B. Dane. 
William H. Eaton. 
Evangeline F. Fonseca. 
Francis J. Hanaford. 
Lizzie E. Harrison. 
Arthur W. Higgins. 
James A. Horrell. 
Anna T. Kaula. 
Nellie M. Keller. 
James M. Kent. 
Leon J. Kibbe. 
Norbert T. Long. 
Jennie M. B. McCloskey. 
Florence G. McMaster. 
Edward L. McShane. 



Charlotte A. Morrow. 
Arthur B. Murphy. 
Edith J. Orne. 
Annie L. Pennock. 
Jean M. Percy. 
Myrtie F. Rich. 
Bernard J. Sheridan. 
Bertha M. L. Simon. 
John T. Skuse. 
Lemmy Arthur Slack. 
Mary A. Sleeper. 
Hortense T. Small. 
Gertrude M. Walker. 
Effie May Wellman. 
Thomas W. Wilson. 
Grace E. Young. 
Arthur L. Saunders. 
Bessie E. Frazee. 



O. S. KNAPP SCHOOL. 



Frank Melvin Barnard. 
Ida May Bradford. 
Lena Frances Bradley. 
Mary Aloyse Burns. 
Leroy White Carr. 
John Patrick Casey. 
Thomas F. H. Cooney. 
Maria Louise Dailey. 
Granville Jasper Daniels. 
Rose Denvir. 
George Cornelius Devine. 
Edward Joseph Dorney. 
Annie Louise Dowley. 
Annie J. Ericksen. 
Frances Emma Franke. 
Annie Ella Fredericksen. 
Thomas F. Fitzgerald, 
George W. Gallagher, 
John Francis Glancey. 
Harold Eugene Hanson. 



Minnie Agnes Hart. 
Edith Angelica Hoffses. 
Edmund Samuel Hunt. 
Agnes Margaret Kenney. 
William George Kenney. 
Horace Loveland Kenny. 
William Kenny. 
William James Keville. 
Bertha Ashley Myers. 
Anphylis J. McCarthy. 
Fred Putnam McElroy. 
James Francis Manning. 
Clifford Wilson Paine. 
Charlotte M. Richardson, 
Roland Sumner Robbins. 
Winifred C. Sheridan. 
Adah Agnes Tincker. 
George Leslie Twohig. 
Florence Elizabeth Zapp. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



209 



CHARLES G. POPE SCHOOL. 



^dwin Adler. 
J. Richard Ambrose. 
Bertha P. Ames. 
Nellie M. Andrews. 
Grace E. Burroughs. 
Ernest C. Burton. 
Clarenca A. Cushman. 
Mary F. Davis. 
Florence E. Day. 
Henry Drouet. 
Frank H. Earl. 
Robert E. Fuller. 
Edward F. Gavin. 
Mary E. Gilson. 
Grace M. Gooding. 
Marion L. Gooding.* 
Sophie T. Haderbolets. 
Annie M. Harvey. 



George H. Heshion. 
Adella R. Hill. 
Florence D, Hurter. 
John R. Kelly. 
Joseph J. Kelly. 
John M. Kirby. 
Lawrence J. McDonald. 
Edith M. McElroy. 
Gertrude F. Niles. 
Louise H. Nims. 
Ella M. Ranks. 
Herbert S. Richardson. 
W. Leonard Stevens. 
Carrie M. Tozier. 
John B. Walker. 
Helen M. Westgate. 
Mary Wilson. 
Amelia W. Wood. 



FORSTER SCHOOL. 



Anson E. Bloomer. 
Otis S. Clement, 
Ernest E. Cleveland. 
John I. Coneeny. 
Louis G. Dearborn. 
James G. Deegan. 
Edward H. Derby. 
Irving J. Fisher. 
Frank O. Freeborn. 
Charles W. French. 
Fred Hammer. 
John F. Hatch. 
William P. Hodgkins. 
Harry E. Hunt. 
Lyman C. Hurd, Jr. 
William F. Jeffers. 
Ernest S. Leavitt. 
Robert S. Littlefield. 
Joseph M. Lowell. 
Jlalph E. Mayhew. 



Wesley A. Maynard. 
Ashley Mills. 
Ernest L. Mills. 
Louis S. Murphy. 
John J. Murray. 
Clarence M. Raymond. 
Horace W, Sexton. 
Harry E. Stephenson. 
Walter M. Small. 
Mary C. Anderson. 
Carrie L. Atwood. 
Daisy M. Bartlett. 
Ethel Bowman. 
Florence L, Brown. 
Elizabeth A. Burke. 
Elizabeth I. Burrage. 
Edith M. Cobb. 
Sadie F. Cromwell. 
Mary E. Crowley. 
Fannie K. Edgecomb. 



210 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Ida M. Fitzpatrick. 
Lizzie M. Flynn. 
Nettie L. Fox. 
Amy W. Freeman, 
Lucy L. Gordon. 
Mary E. Hagerty. 
Amy L. Hamlet. 
Edith B. Hayes. 
Edith L. Hurd. 
Anna E. Hutchinson. 
Mary G. Kane. 
Lillian F. Kemp. 
Fannie E. Krueger. 
Sarah J. Lamont. 
E. Blanche Learned. 
Grace L. Little. 
Mary A. Lyman. 
Almena J. Mansir. 



Jennie S. Mills. 
Ella H. Nelson. 
Alice M. Norton. 
Florence E. Noyes. 
Janet S. Ogilvie. 
Bessie D. Pratt. 
Mabel C. Reed. 
Mercy W. Sanborn. 
Laura M. Stone. 
Elizabeth M. Sutherland. 
Janie M. Thompson. 
Carolyn E. Vreeland. 
Louise A. Wallon. 
Jennie E. Watson. 
Alice A. Welsh. 
Nellie M. Whipple. 
Eunice L. York. 



MORSE SCHOOL. 



Robert L. Baker. 
Oscar Arthur Bengston. 
George Howard Bodge. 
Bertha M. Brett. 
Esther C. Cathcart. 
Ernest Wilson Christie. 
George A. Clark. 
Daniel W. Connors. 
Alice E. Crane. 
Gilford Tilden Currier. 
Mary A. Dunham. 
Florence E. V. Flemming. 
Zephirine L. Fletcher. 
Charles W. Goodrich. 
Benjamin A. Hodgdon. 
Clara Antoinette Howard. 
Martha E. Keating. 
Grace K. Le Bosquet. 
Ada T. C. Leighton. 
Benjamin W. Makant. 
Peter F. Manning. 
John P. Marchant. 
Nellie G. McConnachie. 
Edward B. McGirr. 
Philip F. Moran. 



Ethel Florence Morang. 
Mabel E. Morrill. 
Ada C. Murch. 
Carrie V. Osborn. 
Arthur C. Pearson. 
Nathai: Clinton Proctor. 
Edwin C. F. Reed. 
Josephine M. Sargent. 
A. Edward Scott. 
Edwin C. Scranton. 
Mary E. Seitz. 
Richard Joseph Shea. 
Edgar Chapin Smith. 
Ruth Pearl Smith. 
Christopher W. Sorensen. 
John Arvid Thornquist. 
Arthur W. Turner. 
William H. Waterman. 
Anna B. West. 
Irving J. Wetherbee. 
Oscar Merritt Wheelock. 
Bessie May Whitney. 
Elizabeth Louise Wisdom. 
Harriet Barnes Wisdom. 



"''^-mMi-'i 








REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



211 



HIGHLAND SCHOOL. 



Nicholas A. Baldwin. 
Wallace L. Benjamin. 
A. Marguerite Brown. 
Mabel H. Brown. 
Mary F. Bolger. 
Esther E. Carey. 
Nina Cummings. 
Florence G. Cutler. 
John C. Dowd. 
Fannie C. Downs. 
Edith M. Duhig. 
Edward V. Fitzgerald. 
Maud F. Freethy. 
Ruth M. Howe. 
Alice L. Jansson. 
Annie K. Joscelyn. 
Henry D. Jouett. 
Emma G. Kretschmar. 
Mena F. Kretschmar. 
Charles W. Lavers. 
lima A. Leman. 
Delia W. Marden. 
Louis A. Merry. 



Addie I. Morton. 
Cheever E. Nichols. 
Clara L. Nicholas. 
Mabel L. Nicholson. 
Geneva E. Phillips. 
Ethel G. Richardson. 
Bessie A. Roberts. 
Grace S. Russell. 
Viola B. Russell. 
Ernest G. Shumway. 
Jessie A. Skinner. 
Percy H. Skinner. 
Edith L. Studley. 
Harry C. Thorpe. 
Abbie M. Tribble. 
Maud C. Valentine. 
Emma F. Velio. 
George H. Velio. 
Susan M. Vincent. 
Alice S. Wass. 
Herbert L. Waters. 
Frances S. Wood. 



IN CONCLUSION, 



I am pleaded to state that the work of the schools has progressed 
steadily on ; that all our teachers are full of courage and ambitious to 
make their work tell for the highest interests of the children com" 
mitted to their charge. To them I extend my congratulations and 
thanks for their untiring zeal. To the board, and to all the members 
individually, I wish to express my sincere regard and my high appre- 
ciation of their interest, encouragement, and cordial co-operation and 

support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLARENCE E. MELENEY, 



Superintendent. 



212 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



APPENDIX, 



EXPENDITURES BY THE SCHOOL BOARD. 



Teachers* salaries 
Salaries of officers 
Water and light . 
Text-books and charts 
Writing-books 
Drawing-books and material 
Stationery and supplies 
Printing 
Miscellaneous 

Total school contingent 



$108,058 81 



$3,760 00 

1,064 40 

3,827 09 

297 63 

1,321 93 

1,538 77 

496 32 

900 67 



13,196 81 
$121,255 62 



TABLE SHOWING THE NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, AND PUPILS, THE NUM- 
BER IN THE NINTH CLASS, AND THE AVERAGE NUMBER TO A SCHOOL IN 
THE SEVERAL DISTRICTS IN DECEMBER. 



Districts. 



East Somerville 
Prospect Hill 
Winter Hill . . 
Spring Hill . . 
West Somerville 



C/3 



28 
55 
23 
26 
16 



148 



No. of 
Teachers. 



28 
55 
23 
26 
16 



148 



4 
2 
1 
4 
1 

12 





(0 








n^S 




-u 


6 §< 


o JZ 


'^S. 


:^^ 




5^ 


1,354 


85 


2,435 


127 


1,156 


49 


1,239 


64 


763 


80 


6,947 


405 



a JZ 

(y re 
> 

< 



48.4 
44.3 
50.0 
47.7 

47.7 



46.9 



1. — Principals of large grammar schools. 

2. — Regular teachers. 

3. — Assistants. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



213 



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Sanitation. 




Grounds. 



^14 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 





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2 

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M 




.... . . ^ 




Highland Avenue 
Myrtle Street . . 
Cross Street . . 
Tufts Street . . 
Vinal Avenue . . 
School Street . . 
Medford Street . 
Concord Square . 
Webster Avenue 
Washington Street 
Washington Street 
Joy Street . . . 
Poplar Street . . 
Sycamore Street . 
Jaques Street . . 
Lowell Street . . 
Summer Street 
Beech Street . . 
Beech Street . . 
Somerville Avenue . 
Beacon Street . . 
Cherry Street . . 
Cedar Street . . 
Highland Avenue 
Broadway, Clarendoi 




en 
-J 
O 

o 
I 
u 

CO 
















High . . . 
Prescott . . . 
Edgerly . . . 
Davis . . . 
L. V. Bell . . 
Cummings . . 
Brastow . . 
O. S. Knapp . 
Webster . . 
Charles G. Pope 
Prospect Hill . 
Bennett . . 
Jackson . . 
Forster . . . 
J. T. Glines . 
Bingham . . 
Morse . . . 
Beech-street . 
Spring Hill 
Franklin 
Harvard . . 
*Burns . . . 
Cedar-street . 
Highland . . 
Lincoln . . 




H 
y 

2 
H 

P 
















CO ^ 




•> B _ ^ t. 

f ^^ K" ^ S 1 

:^ 1 S- - ^- - - - , . "2 

c«--o .5^ oi 



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P^ 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



215 



TEACHERS. 



Number of teachers in High School 

Number of teachers in grammar grades ( including 

two assistants ) 

Number of teachers in primary grades ( including 

ten assistants ) 

Number of principals of large grammar schools . . 

Teachers of music 

Teachers of sewing 

Teacher of drawing 

Total . . 



Male. 


Female. 


3 


10 


1 


83 





76 


7 


1 


1 


1 


- 


2 


- 


1 


12 


174 



13 

84 

70 
8 
2 
2 
1 



186 



SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS. 



Schools. 


Teachers. 


Where Educated. 


Sala- 
ries. 




High . . . 


George L. Baxter . . 


Harvard College . . . 


$2,400 


1867 


« 


Frank M. Hawes . . 


Tufts College 


1,800 


isn 


(( 


Charles T. Murray . . 


Dartmouth College . . . 


1,400 


1887 


(( 


Sarah W. Fox . . . 


High School, Taunton. 
Instruction in classics 










and German abroad . . 


1,200 


1868 


« 




Fannie W. Kaan . . 


Salem Normal School 


850 


1882 


(. 










Eudora Morey . . . 


Bridgewater Normal Sch'l 


850 


1882 


(( 










Bertha L. Brown . . 


Colby University . . . 


775 


1892 


(( 










Mary M. Kingsbury . 


Boston University . . . 


775 


1892 


«( 










M. Isabel Goldthwaite 


Boston University . . . 


775 


1893 


<( 










Mrs. Lena Gilbert . . 


Darmstadt and Versailles 


700 


1893 


(( 










Helen H. Wadsworth 


Boston University . . . 


700 


1893 


(I 








Alice E. Sawtelle . . 


Colby University . . . 


775 


1893 


Prescott 






G. A. Southworth . . 


Chicago, 111., and Lowell 
(Mass.) High School . 


1,900 


1873 










Anna M. Bates . . . 


Salem Normal School 


700 


1874 












Adelaide Reed . . . 


Bridgew'r Normal School 


650 


1877 












Emma M. Gate . . . 


High School, Winchester 


600 


1882 












Abbie A. Anderson 


Canton Training School . 


600 


1878 












Amelia I. Sears . . . 


Westfield Normal School 


600 


1873 












Grace L. Shaw . . . 


Quincy Training School . 


600 


1892 












Catherine T. Brown . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1868 












Clara Taylor .... 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1871 












Sarah E. Pratt . . . 


Bridgewater Nor'l School 


600 


1877 












Elgina M. Plummer . 


High School, Boston . . 


600 


1877 












Louise E. Pratt . . . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1889 






» 






*A. Maude Emerson 
*Frances M. Seymour . 


Somerville High School . 
Somerville High School . 


275 
350 


1890 




216 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SCHOOLS AND T^.KCYL^'R.S. — Continued. 



Schools. 


Teachers. 


Where Educated. 


Sala- 
ries. 


»H Ay 

<u a 


Edgerly . . 


Charles E. Brainard . 


High School, Danielson- 










ville, Conn 


$1,700 


1889 




Josephine Hills . . . 


Framingham Nor'l School 


675 


1893 




Anne A. I.athrop . . 


Wellesley College and 










Harvard Annex . . . 


600 


1890 




Annie L. Dimpsey . . 


Ayer High School . . . 


600 


1891 




Etta Colburn ... . 


Plymouth (N. H.) Normal 










School 


500 


1892 




Gertrude L. Gardner . 


R. I. State Normal Sch'l 


600 


1889 




Carrie A. Colton . . 


Bridgewater Normal Sch'l 


600 


1893 




Emma L. Zeigler . . 


' Milton High School . . 


600 


1891 




Helen P. Bennett . . 


Plymouth (N. H.) Normal 










School 


600 


1890 




Alice M. Bearing . . 


High School, Lisbon Falls, 










Me 


600 


1890 




Lillian Nealley . . . 


Salem Normal School 


600 


1882 




Clara M. Bagley . . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1873 




Martha M. Power . . 


Quincy Training Class 


400 


1891 




*Florence N. Day . . 


Somerville High School . 


27o 


- 


Davis . . . 


Lucretia A. Burns . . 


Framingham Nor'l School 


675 


1882 




Gertrude A. Earle . . 


Bridgewater Normal Sch'l 


600 


1884 




Annie J. Richardson . 


Winchester High School 


600 


1889 




Priscilla A. Merritt 


Salem Normal School 


600 


1885 




*Nettie M. Orne . . . 


Somerville High School . 


350 


- 




*Carrie T. Lincoln . . 


Somerville High School . 


275 


- 


L.V. Bell \ '. 


Fred W. Shattuck . . 


Dartmouth College . . 


1,800 


1890 


<( 


May E. Berry . . . 


Somerville High School . 


675 


1880 


(< 


Emma F. Schuh . . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1874 


« 


Nellie S. Dickey . . 


Quincy Training School . 


600 


1889 


<( 


Mary A. Bradford . . 


Mt. Holyoke Seminary , 


600 


1888 


« 


Anna L. Dickerman . 


Bridgewater Normal Sch'l 


600 


1890 


(( 


Vyra L. Tozier . . . 


Gorham (Me.) Nor'l Sch'l 


600 


1892 


(1 


Mabel S. Totman . . 


Weymouth High School 


600 


1892 


<( 


Mary S. Rinn . . . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1889 


(< 


Anna L. Alger . . . 


Framingham Nor'l School 


500 


1891 


(1 


Ines M. Dernier , . 


Salem Normal School . . 


600 


1891 


«( 


Martha E. Daniels . . 


Somerville High School . 


500 


1891 


<( 


Eliza L. Schuh . . . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1882 


<< 


Eula M. Byrns . . . 


Somerville High School . 


350 


1892 


Cummings 


Lydia J. Page . . . 


Somerville High School . 


675 


1869 


(1 


Fannie L. Gwynn . . 


Salem Normal School 


600 


1886 


« 


Ida F. Fillebrown . . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1888 


(< 


Annie Coffin .... 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1884 


O. S. Knapp . 


Harry N. Andrews 


Bridgewater Normal Sch'l 


1,500 


1890 


(< 


Abbie C. Hunt . . . 


Ipswich Female Seminary 


675 


1873 


K 


Emma Frye .... 


R. I. Normal School . . 


600 


1891 


(( 


Dorcas C. Higgins . . 


Quincy Training School . 


600 


1891 


(< 


Annie E. Robinson 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1876 



♦Assistant. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



21T 



SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS. — Continued. 



Schools. 


Teachers. 


Where Educated. 


Sala- 
ries. 




O. S. Knapp . 


Abbie A. Gurney . . 


Bridgewater Nor'l School 


$600 


1888 


t< 


Lena G. Allen . . . 


Somerville High School - 


600 


1884 


« 


Minnie A. Perry . . 


Salem Normal School 


500 


1891 


(« 


Lucia Alger .... 


Bridgewater Nor'l School 


600 


1889 


« 


*Miriam Cavanagh . . 


Salem Normal School 


200 


1892 


« 


*M. Louise Sanderson . 


Miss A. L. Page's Kinder- 










garten Normal . . . 


200 


1892 


Webster . . 


Clara B. Parkhurst 


Salem Normal School 


675 


1889 


« 


Nellie F. Sheridan . . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1888 


u 


Annie L. Savage . . 


Salem Normal School 


600 


1873 


(( 


Mary C. Friend . . . 


Miss Symonds' Kinder- 










garten Normal . . . 


400 


1892 


Chas. G. Pope 


George M. Wadsworth, 


Brown University . . . 


1,700 


1891 


(( <( 


Florence A. Chaney 


Hermon High Sch'l, N. Y. 


675 


1892 


(( (« 


Harriet M. Clark . . 


Salem Normal School 


600 


1893 


(( i( 


Alice I. Norcross . . 


Watertown High School 


600 


1885 


« <( 


Frances A. Wilder . . 


High Sch'l and Academy . 


600 


1874 


« « 


Lizzie W. Parkhurst . 


Gloucester Training Sch'l 


600 


1885 


« « 


Jane Parker .... 


Salem Normal School 


600 


1892 


« « 


Carrie E. Cobb . . . 


Taunton High School . . 


600 


1887 


(( (( 


Ellen P. Longfellow . 


Framingham Normal Sch'l 


500 


1891 


(( i( 


Maria Miller .... 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1869 


<( « 


Lillian C. Albee . . . 


High School, No. Attle- 










boro' 


600 


1888 


« « 


Lydia E. Morrill . . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1892 


« « 


Maizie E. Blaikie . . 


Somerville High School . 


500 


1891 


Prospect Hill . 


Helen Tincker . . . 


Mt. Holyoke Seminary and 










Salem Normal School . 


800 


1872 


« (( 


Emma L. Nason . . 


Salem Normal School 


600 


1891 


« <( 


Clara B. Sackett . . 


Westfield Normal School 


600 


1891 


« (( 


Grace Emerson . . . 


Farmington (Me.) Normal 










School 


600 


1892 


t( (( 


Mary C. Jones . . . 


Gorham (Me.) Nor'l Sch'l 


600 


1891 


(( i( 


Blanche Seabury . . 


Kindergarten Nor'l Sch'l 


500 


1892 


Bennett . . 


Mary B. Smith . . . 


Maine Wes. Seminary 


675 


1885 


n 


Annie G. Sheridan . . 


Salem Normal School . . 


600 


1886 


« 


Isadore E. Taylor . . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1883 


(( 


Minnie Wiggins . . . 


Kraus' Normal Kinder- 










garten School .... 


600 


1892 


Jackson . . 


Annie E. McCarty . . 


Somerville High School . 


675 


1880 


« 


Jeannette M. Billings . 


Quincy Training School . 


600 


1892 


it 


Annie E. Crimmings . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1884 


« 


Lena B. Blaikie . . . 


Bridgewater Nor'l School 


350 


1893 


(i 


*Annie W. Hatch . . 


New Britain Nor'l School 


275 


1892 


Forster . . 


John S. Hayes . . . 


Phillips Exeter Academy, 


1,800 


1878 


(t 


Mary E. Northup . . 


High School, Centreville, 


675 


1878 


« 


Mary E. Stiles . . . 


Farmington Nor'l School, 


675 


1883 


« 


Jennie L. Thompson . 


Plymouth ( N. H.) Normal 










School 


600 


1892 



* Assistant. 



218 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SCHOOLS AND TY.KCYiY.K^. — Continued. 



Schools. 


Teachers. 


Where Educated. 


Sala- 
ries. 




Forster . . 


Elizabeth A. Page . . 


Plymouth ( N. H.) Normal 










School 


$600 


1890 


^^ 


Lizzie V. Clement . . 


Seminary, Tilton, N. H. . 


600 


1884 


(1 




Addie S. Winnek . . 


Salem Normal School 


600 


1883 


(( 




Lucy K. Hatch . . . 


Castine (Me.) Nor'l Sch'l, 


600 


1892 


<( 




Alice A. Batchelor . . 


Northboro' High School . 


600 


1877 


« 




Martha H. Pennock . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1873 


(C 




Annie S. Gage . . . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1883 


<« 




Harriet A. Brown . . 


Westfield Normal School, 


600 


1890 


« 




Grace Shorey , . . 


Salem Normal School . . 


300 


1892 


]. T. Glines . 


Mrs. Cora E. Dimpsey 


Boston University . . . 


800 


1890 


(( 


M. Frances Guptill 


Elliott ( Me.) Academy . 


600 


1869 


(( 


Nellie A. Boynton . . 


Framingham Nor'l Sch'l, 


600 


1891 


<< 


Annie J. Reed . . . 


Boston Normal School 


500 


1891 


n 


Margaret A. Orr . . 


Bridgewater Normal Sch'l 


500 


1891 


<( 


Florence E. Baxter 


Somerville High School . 


350 


1891 


<< 


Ernma Burckes . . . 


Somerville High School . 


400 


1890 


Bingham . . 


Nora F. Byard . . . 


Somerville High School . 


675 


1884 


<( 




Luetta M. Wescott 


Gorham ( Me.) Nor'l Sch'l, 


600 


1892 


t( 




Ruby A. Johnson . . 


Boston Normal School , 


600 


1892 


(( 




Belle J. Tifft .... 


R, I. State Normal School, 


600 


1892 


i( 




*Mabel E. Mansir . . 


Somerville High School . 


200 


1891 


Morse . 




Mina J. Wendell . . 


High and Training Sch'ls, 












Woburn 


1,600 


1882 


« 




Sarah S. Waterman . 


Bridgewater Nor'l School 


675 


1887 


(( 






Stella Hall .... 


Salem Normal School 


675 


1884 


(( 






Pauline S. Downs . . 


Cooper Union, New York 
City 


600 


1872 


<( 






tElla F. Gould . . . 


Lowell High School . . 


600 


1882 


(( 






INellie A. Hamblin . . 


Bridgewater Nor'l School, 


600 


- 


<( 






tAmy C. Hudson . . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1885 


(< 






jMrs. Maria F. Hill . 


Castine Normal School . 


600 


- 


« 






Anna E. Sawyer . . 


Somerville High School . 


600 


1873 


(( 






Vacancy 




- 


- 


« 






Mary A. Haley . . . 


Boston High School 


600 


1867 


<( 






Lizzie E. Hill . . . 


N. H. State Normal Sch'l, 


600 


1891 


<( 






Mary E. Bosworth . . 


N. H. State Normal Sch'l, 


650 


1882 


(( 






Ella P. McLeod . . . 


Gloucester Training Sch'l, 


600 


1888 


(i 






Annabel M. Perry . . 


Somerville High School . 


350 


1891 


<( 






*Hattie I. Cottrell . . 


Boston Normal School 


350 


1892 


(( 






*Hattie C. Wheel . . 


Plymouth ( N. H.) Normal 










School 


350 


1892 


u 


*Grace B. Tibbitts . . 


Cambridge Lligh School . 


275 


1890 


Beech-Street . 


Emma T. Tower . , 


Somerville High School • 


600 


1890 


a 


Florence B. Ashley 


Somerville High School • 


600 


1887 


Spring Hill . 


Hattie E. Read . . . 


Miss Symonds' Kindergar- 










ten Normal . . . . • 


400 


1892 


Franklin , . 


Hattie A. Hills . . . 


Somerville High School . 


675 


1874 



* Assistant. 



t On leave of absence. 



$ Substitute. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



2ia 



SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS. 



Concluded. 



Schools. 



Franklin 
(( 

(( 

Harvard 
(( 

Burns . 

(( 

(( 
<( 

Cedar-street 
(( (< 

Highland 



Lincoln 



Music . 

Drawing 
Sewing 



Teachers. 



Anna C. Damon 
Ella M. Coops . . 
Caroline S. Plimpton 
Carrie A. Fowle 
*Mabel Blaikie . . 
Laura J. Brooks 
Minnie S. Turner . 
Annie L. Brown 
Florence M. Hamlin 
Elizabeth G. Boardman 
Mary E. Lacy . . 
George E. Nichols 
M. Alice Paul 
Jennie S. Wescott 
Mabel A. Jepson 
S. Adelaide Blood 
Annie R. Cox 
Grace M. Clark . 
Jennie C. Frazier 
Sarah E. Pray 
Hallie M. Hood . 
Jennie M. Horner 
Agnes M. Ward 
Lucretia C. Sanborn 



H. F. Hathaway 
Carrie E. Fay 
Charlotte F. Mott 

Eliza H. Lunt 
*Mary A. Joyce . 
S. Henry Hadley 
Mrs. Gish Garwood 
Augusta L. Balch 
Mrs. C. M. Coffin 
Mary L. Boyd 



Where Educated. 



Worcester Normal School 
Gloucester Training Sch'l 
Southbridge, Mass. 
Salem Normal School 
Quincy Training School 

Providence 

Somerville High School 
Cambridge High School 
Somerville High School 
Salem Normal School . 
Somerville High School 
Dartmouth College 
Somerville High School 
Gorham Normal School 
Framingham Normal Sch' 
Salem Normal School 
State Nor'l School, N. H 
Salem Normal School 
Boston Normal School 
Somerville High School 
Somerville High School 
Somerville High School 
Bridgewater Nor'l School 
N. H, Normal School and 

Boston Kindergarten 
Bridgewater Nor'l School 
Oberlin College . . . 
Private School, Wadding 

ton, N. Y 

Concord High School . 
Albany (N.Y.) Nor'l Sch' 
Somerville High School 



Mass. Normal Art School 
Nantucket High School 



Sala- 
ries. 



600 
600 
350 
200 
675 
600 
600 
600 
625 
350 
1,800 
675 
675 
600 
600 
600 
500 
600 
600 
600 
500 
600 

600 
800 
600 

600 
600 
425 
1,333 
500 
700 
600 
600 






1879- 

1892 

1859 

1892 

1892 

1883; 

1885. 

1885 

1889) 

1891 

1890 

1877- 

1879. 

1892. 

1892- 

1882 

1883. 

1893. 

1887, 

1878 

1884 

1888 

1892 

1888 
1890. 
1889 

1886 
1890 
1891 
1868 
1892 
1892 
1888 
1888 



* Assistant. 



220 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



PUPILS. 

Number of persons in the city on the first day of May last, between five 

and fifteen years of age 7,191 

Number between eight and fourteen years of age 4,446 



Whole number registered during the year 

Average whole number 

Average attendance 

Per cent, of attendance 

Number cases of tardiness 

Number cases of dismissal 

Number cases of punishment 

Number pupils in attendance in January 

Number pupils in attendance in December 

Average number of pupils to a teacher 

Number pupils over fifteen years of age 

Number pupils between 8 and 14 years of age 



High 
School. 



521 
510 

484 
95 



507 
549 
42.4 
476 
6 



Grammar 

and Prim. 

Schools. 



8,599 
6,525 
6,124 

93.8 
3,181 
2,523 

702 

6,602 

6,947 

47 

315 
4,769 



Total. 



9,120 
7,035 
6,608 

93.9 
3,181 
2,523 

7(j2 
7,109 
7,496 

46.6 

791 
4,775 



TABLE OF PUPILS BY GRADES. 

(Number registered in December.) 





' • 


■^ «5 








Average 


73 V 


<u . 

3S 


Grades. 


Class. 


6"^ 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


Age. 


«l 






H 












O U 








^^^ 














yrs. 

18 


Mos. 




High. . 


Fourth year 


' 


33 


52 


85 


2 


_ 


_ 


(1 


Third 


13 


34 


81 


115 


17 


2 


- 


- 


« 


Second " 


43 


82 


125 


16 


7 


- 


- 


H 


First " J 




78 


146 


224 


15 


7 


- 


- 






188 


361 


549 










Grammar 


Ninth . . . 


9 


199 


205 


404 


14 


10 


334 


— 




Eighth . . 


10 


213 


227 


440 


14 


- 


388 


6 




Seventh . . 


13 


337 


287 


624 


13 


2 


483 


37 




Sixth . . . 


*15 


368 


320 


688 


12 


1 


554 


14 




Fifth . . . 


*18 


407 


341 


748 


11 


4 


623 


22 




Fourth . . 


19 

84 


453 


381 


834 


10 


2 


727 


46 




1,977 


1,761 


3,738 








Primary . 


Third . . . 


*18 


487 


416 


903 


9 


— 


724 


39 


<i 


Second . . 


t20 


547 


451 


998 


7 


9 


792 


28 


<t 


First . . . 


t38 


708 


600 


1,308 


6 


3 


833 


36 




76 


1,742 
3,907 


1,467 


3,209 






. Total 


**173 


3,589 


7,496 







* Including one assistant. 
1 1ncluding two assistants. 



t Including seven assistants. 

** Besides eight principals of buildings. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



221 



5' 




n 
< 

n 

a 


'XI 


5* 


o 




8 




3 

en 








rr 








Cf 




P' 














=r 














O ! 






















J^ 
























> 
























d 






















w 






1 




, 


1' 


1 


, 


h-* 


to 

25 


Boys. 






























1 




r 


1 


1 


1 


CO 


to 

o 

CO 


Girls. 






1 




1 


1 


, 


to 


p-» 
00 


to 
-J 

o 


Boys. 


9t^ 








































CO 


to 

OI 


Girls. 
















1-* 




i-» 








1 




1 


1 


Oi 


C31 


CO 


to 

CO 


Boys 


















CI 


-J 


CO 


Girls. 














>p 


OI 


OI 


CO 










. 




1 


H- 




CO 


CO 


o 


Boys. 


r > CO 




































>4^ 




t-' 

o 


to 


Girls. 


p « 














00 


00 


CO 


CO 










1 


►— 


t-» 


CO 

CO 


Si 

o 


CO 
CO 


Oi 
OI 


OI 


Boys. 




































►f^ 


^ 


to 


05 




Girls. 


P a 










CO 


!-• 


»4^ 


to 


CO 


CO 










t 


CO 


00 


to 


I-' 
CO 

CO 


C3 
Oi 


to 


4^ 


Boys. 












en 


I-* 

o 


H* 


CO 


^ 




Girls. 








CT 


Oi 


~J 


00 


00 


05 


kf^ 




w 






en 


to 


to 

o 


o 

00 


05 
CD 


to 


1 


to 


Boys. 


o"^ 
























p w ^ 








^ 


CO 


t-l 


rf^ 


H-' 






Giris. 






CO 


to 


>^ 


to 


"^ 


^ 


OI 










*. 


to 


o 


CO 


CO 
CO 


CO 


=1 


05 


h-» 


Boys. 


5^- 




























to 


-1 


oc 


»;>- 


to 








Girls. 




CT 




00 


-Q 




OS 


to 




'-' 








OS 


en 

00 


o 


05 

05 


to 


05 


rfi. 


l-» 




Boys 


P5 


























C*9 


-q 


-5 


CT 


to 










Girls. 






en 




CO 




-J 














-Q 


OS 


en 


to 


^ 










Boys. 


P » 




d 


to 




CO 


o 


cn 


to 






























-q 


Oi 


>p» 


to 












Girls. 




. o 


><^ 


OT 


00 


OT 


rf^ 














-q 

h- 


CO 

05 


05 


ri^ 


. 










Boys. 




























05 


Co 


H- 














Girls. 




o 


to 


■~ 




















tc 


-5 


l-» 


l-» 


H-" 










Boys. 


5S» 


























re 


















Girls. 




CT 


•— 


to 


^ 


>-» 
















(-• 


^ 


»-' 


1 


. 










Boys. 


?^^ 
























P^'' 






















Girls. 




O 


re 


to 




















^ r 1 1 1 1 1 ' > 


Boys. 




























- 


1 


1 


' 


• 


- 


1 


• 


1 


j Girls. 





O 



O 
> 

> 2 



a 



> 



> 

O 

o 
o 



W 









H 

w 

< 

> 

o 

> 
d 
w 

O 

H 

Ml 



222 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



EXHIBIT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



SCHOOLS. 

















-ri 


t3 


^Si 


lO 


1 ^ 








^ 


tf> 


in 


53 


s 


^-F 


ll 




ft 




C 




Q 


5 
a, 


^ 






> 

O 


i2 

s 

4) 

1) 


S 


in 

0) 

U 


o 

aj 
in 

U 


tn 

0) 

in 

nJ 
U 


in 2 
art 




lU C 
0) 4) 


in 

'2, aJ 
S biO 


.^-^ 






u 






0) +J 


3 03 


o 1) 

S c 

3 <A 


•S?H 


^5 


> 




3 C 


n 


3 £ 


> o 


s 2 

3>< 


< 


^ 


fin 


Z 


^ 


2 


2 


2 


<:*^ 


2 






3 0) 

o^ 

1-r _^ 

<U x! 

e ^ 

300 



High . . . 
Prescott . . 
Edgerly . . 
Davis . . 
L. V. Bell . 
Cummings . 
O. S. Knapp 
Webster . . 
Charles G. Pop 
Prospect Hill 
Bennett . 
Jackson . . 
Forster . . 
J. T. Glines 
Bingham 
Morse 
Beech-st. and Spring 

Hill . . 
Franklin 
Harvard . . 
Burns. . 
Cedar-street 
Highland 
Lincoln . . 



Total 



521 
773 
571 
331 
713 
262 
604 
230 
654 
125 
248 
273 
686 
362 
281 
697 

137 

272 
96 

273 
88 

669 

254 



9,120 



510 
564 

502 
223 
553 
193 
448 
145 
517 
110 
200 
161 
569 
298 
209 
563 

46 
187 

59 
213 

57 
532 
176 

7,035 



484 


95. 


530 


94. 


473 


94. 


209 


93. 


526 


95. 


179 


94. 


415 


93. 


136 


93 


486 


94 


101 


92. 


181 


9). 


147 


91. 


546 


96. 


282 


95. 


196 


94. 


527 


93. 


41 


91. 


180 


96 


54 


92. 


198 


93. 


52 


91. 


498 


94. 


167 


95. 


6,608 


93.9 



102 

73 

64 

215 

127 

256 

20(1 

279 

41 

230 

233 

66 

8» 

148 

256 

199 
55 

108 

129 
39 

221 
60 



3,181 



64 
171 

48 

324 
60 

2)9 
55 

193 
70 
41 
15 

129 
51 
79 

325 

15 
41 
10 
63 
7 
438 
65 



2,523 



702 



507 


549 


604 


582 


485 


530 


219 


242 


575 


608 


199 


18. 


462 


48 s 


133 


158 


553 


498 


85 


147 


162 


169 


168 


180 


572 


599 


282 


333 


199 


224 


581 


611 


78 


126 


190 


196 


60 


63 


213 


185 


69 


58 


535 


563 


178 


200 


7,109 


7,496 



42.4 


476 


6 


4S.5 


29 


455 


44.2 


44 


305 


6 '.5 


- 


123 


47.5 


33 


4i5 


46 8 


- 


108 


4S.8 


32 


299 


39.5 


- 


105 


41.5 


28 


411 


36 5 


3 


112 


42 3 


- 


71 


45. 


- 


112 


49.9 


53 


423 


47.6 


6 


24 i 


56. 


- 


157 


51. 


46 


448 


42. 


_ 


25 


49 


. 


185 


63. 


- 


13 


46 3 


1 


li4 


29. 


- 


25 


46.8 


37 


386 


50. 


3 


185 


46.6 


791 


4,775- 



STATISTICS OF EVENING SCHOOLS. 

(SEASON OF 1892-3.) 



Prescott School 

L. V. Bell 

Burns • • 

Drawing School ( Mechanical ) 

Total 





ol 






-o 


4J U 




VM in 


lU 


^5 


O 4) 


o c 


0. 






o 




< 




^c^ 


67 


27 


3 


43 


133 


30 


6 


41 


41 


25 


3 


41 


96 


60 


3 


36 


337 


142 


15 





o-C 






$219 00 
243 00 
224 00 
396 00 



$1,082 00 



o. 



$46 00 
41 00 
44 00 
41 00 



$172 00 



Cost of instruction 

Cost of supplies and lights 

Cost of janitois' services 



$1,082 OC 
517 10 
172 00 



Total cost 



$1,771 10' 



T 



V- r"f k,^- 




I ,11 




REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



223 



ADDITIONAL STATISTICS OF THE HIGH SCHOOL. 



Whole number of different pupils during the year . . . 742 

Largest number at one time . . ... . . . 577 

Number admitted during the year ..... 242 

" from our Grammar Schools ... . . . . 228 

" from other schools . . . . . . . 14 

" graduated . . 80 

'^ of graduates who entered college . . . . .21 

" of graduates who entered Institute of Technology and 

Scientific Schools . . . . . . . 4 

" who have left during the year exclusive of graduates . 120 

Whole number at the present time, December, 1892 . . 549 

Average number to a teacher , . . . . . . . 42.2 

Number over fifteen years of age . . , . . . ' 472 

" in course preparatory to college ..... 171 

" pursuing the regular course . . . . . . 277 

" pursuing the English course . . . . . . 101 

" in the first class when it entered the school . . . 187 

" in the first class at the present time .... 85 

" in the second class when it entered the school . . 196 

" in the second class at the present time . . . 115 

" in the third class when it entered the school . . 218 

^' in the third class at the present time .... 125 

" in the fourth class when it entered the school . . 238 

" in the fourth class at the present time .... 224 



REPORT OF TRUANT OFFICER. 



Number of visits to schools 

" absences investigated . 

" cases of truancy 

" truants arrested 

*' sent to House of Reformation 



603 

480 

160 

5 

4 



224 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



PROGRAMMES OF SEWING TEACHERS. 



Monday . . . 
Tuesday | ^; ^; 
Wednesday . . 
Thursday < ' 

Friday < 



M. 



A. M. 
P. M. 



MRS. COFFIN. 



L. V. Bell School 

O. S. Knapp School .... 

Burns School 

Morse School 

Highland School 

Franklin and Cummings Schools 
Lincoln School 



MISS BOYD. 



Forster School. 
Davis and Edgerly Sch'ls. 
Edgerly School. 
Prescott School. 
Prospect Hill School. 
J, T. Glines School. 
Charles G. Pope School. 
Charier, G. Pope and Bing- 
ham Schools. 



PROGRAMME OF MR. HADLEY, MUSIC TEACHER. 

GRADES VI TO HIGH SCHOOL. 



Monday a. m. . 
Tuesday I ^;^; 



Wednesday < 



A.M. 
P. M. 



!A. M. 
M. . 
P. M. 



SCHOOLS. 



. Forster, J. T. Glines. 
L. V. Bell, O. S. Knapp. 

Morse. 

Lincoln, Highland. 
• . Charles G. Pope. 

Prescott. 

High. 

Edgerly. 



PROGRAMME OF VISITS OF MRS. GARWOOD, MUSIC 
TEACHER. — GRADES i to v. 



January 

February 

March . 

April 

May 

June 



Wednesday 



Thursday 



A.M. 

P.M. 

A. M. 

P. M. 



Wed. Thur. 



4 
1 

8 

5 

10 

7 



11 



Prescott . 

Edgerly . 

j Knapp . 
I Harvard 
Davis . . 



Wed. Thur. 



11 

8 

15 

12 

17 
14 

Pope . 

Glines 

Bell . 
Forster 



12 
9 
16 
13 
18 
15 



Wed. Thur. Wed. Thur. 



18 
15 
22 
19 
24 
21 



19 
16 
23 
20 
25 
22 



( Bennett . 
I Jackson . 
j Franklin 
( Beech-st. 
j Webster 
I Prosp't Hill 
Cummings . 



25 26 
23 

29 30 

26 27 
31 June 1 
28 " 29 

( Morse. 
( Burns. 

Highland. 

j Bingham, 
j Cedar-st. 
Lincoln. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



225 



PROGRAMME OF VISITS OF MISS BALCH, DRAWING 

TEACHER. 



Prescott School, Mon., A. M. . 
Edgerly School, Mon., P. M. . 
Pope School, Tues., A. M. . . 
Davis School, Tues., P. M. . . 
Bell School, Wed., A. M. 
Supplementary Work, Wed., P. M 
Highland School, Mon., A. M. . 
Prospect Hill School, Mon., P. M 
Forster School, Tues., A. M. . 
Cummings School, Tues., P. M. 
Knapp School, Wed., A. M. 
Supplementary Work, Wed., P. M 
Morse School, Mon., A. M. . . 
Webster School, Mon., P. M. . 

Bennett School, ) 

> Tues., A. M. 
Jackson School, ; 

Franklin School, Tues., P. M. . 

Glines School, Wed., A. M. . . 

Supplementary Work, Wed., P. M 

Beech-st. School, ) yr . ^ 
Harvard School, ) •» • • 

Supplementary Work, Mon., P. M 

Lincoln School, I ^ues., A. M. 
Burns School, ) ' 

Supplementary Work, Tues., P. M 
Bingham School, ) 

> Wed., A. M. 
Cedar-st. School, ) 

Supplementary Work, Wed., P. M 



Feb. 



13 
13 
14 
14 
15 
15 
20 
20 

21 
21 



Mar. 



13 
13 
14 

14 
15 

15 
20 

20 
21 
21 

22 

22 
27 
27 

28 

28 

5,29 
- 29 

6 

6 

7 




Apr. 


May. 


10 


15 


10 


15 


11 


16 


11 


16 


12 


17 


12 


17 


17 


22 


17 


22 


18 


23 


18 


23 


19 


24 


19 




24 


29 


24 


29 




( Wed., 


25 


} P. M., 




( 24 




( Wed., 


25 


] P. M., 




t 31 


26 


31 


26 


- 


3 


8 


3 


8 


4 


9 


4 


9 " 


5 


10 


5 


10 



June. 



12 
12 
13 
13 
14 
14 
19 
19 
20 
20 

21 
21 

26 
26 

27 

27 

28 
28 

5 

5 

6 
6 

7 

7 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, February 1, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, February 1, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports, 

in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of the Water Board, January 26, 1893. 

To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council : — 

The Somerville Mystic Water Board submits the following as its 
nineteenth annual report, beingfor the year ending December 31, 1892. 

COST OF WATER WORKS. 



The total cost of works on December 31, 1891 was . $537,185 35 
Expended during the past year for water-works 

extension 34,863 17 



Total cost December 31, 1892 .... $572,04852 

It may be doubted if the above figures represent with absolute 
accuracy the entire cost of the water works, as it is often a nice 
question of book-keeping to rightly apportion a particular expenditure 
between extension and maintenance accounts. The difficulty arises 
chiefly in those cases where it becomes necessary to remove an old 
water main from a street and substitute therefor a pipe of greater 
capacity. Such substitutions are frequently made, and it is only 
possible to determine approximately the percentage of cost properly 
chargeable to extension account. It has been the invariable rule 
during the past year to charge to extension account the cost of all 



230 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

materials used in relaying a street, and to charge the cost of labor 
to maintenance account. Somerville has expended upon her water 
works much less, relatively, than many Massachusetts cities, but it 
should be remembered that she is not the owner of her water supply, 
storage reservoir, principal pumping station, or main water conduits,. 

WATER DEBT. 

The total outstanding indebtedness of the city, on account of the 
water works, on the 31st day of December, 1891, was $375,500.00. 

We are glad to be able to report that no addition to the debt has 
been made during the past year. On the contrary, the income from 
the water works, together with a balance of $5,150.80 remaining from 
1891, has been sufficient to meet the entire expenditures of the water 
department, both for maintenance and extension, to pay all the 
interest accruing during the past year on the funded water debt, and 
to leave a balance of $7,061.71 to be applied the present year 
towards the payment of the principal of the debt. 

The above mentioned indebtedness is represented by water loan 
bonds, nearly all of which are of the denomination of $1,000.00, matur- 
ing at intervals from July 1, 1893, to October 1, 1920. The rates of 
interest on the bonds are as follows : — 

$10,000.00 draws interest at 5^ per cent, per annum. 



105,500.00 


a 


a 


"5 


a 


a 


260,000.00 


li 


a 


"4 


li 


11 



That part of the loan drawing more than four per cent, interest 
was negotiated several years ago, when rates of interest were much 
higher than at present. 

In the present state of the city's finances, we feel that only the 
most urgent necessity would justify an increase of the water debt. 
It seems probable that Somerville will be compelled, in the near 
future, to meet extraordinary expenditures on account of her water 
supply. Meanwhile, it is the manifest duty of the Water Board to 
practice a reasonable economy in expenditures, thereby gradually 
reducing the water debt and increasing the borrowing capacity of the 
city when the time for unusual outlays arrives. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 231 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS. 

The following tables exhibit the receipts and payments for main- 
tenance and extension of the water works during the year 1892 : — 

MAINTENANCE. 



Received, unexpended balance from appropriation 

for 1891 . . . ... . . $599 58 

Received, amount appropriated by City Council for 

1892 20,000 00 

Received, transfers from extension account . . 9,000 00 

" collections from sundry persons for work 
done 1,414 08 

Received, profit on water services .... 760 14 

Paid for maintenance of water works, $29,275 79 
" " work done for sundry persons, 1,414 08 

Balance unexpended at end of year . 1,083 93 



EXTENSION. 



$31,773 80 $31,773 80 



Received, unexpended balance from appropriation for 

1891 $4,423 41 

Received, amount appropriated by City Council for 

1892 40,000 00 

Received, collections from sundry persons for work 

done . . . 2,261 47 

Paid for extension of water works . $34,863 17 

" " work done for sundry persons, 2,261 47 

Transferred to maintenance account . 9,000 00 

Balance unexpended at end of year . 560 24 



$46,684 88 $46,684 88 



232 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE SHOWING INCOME FROM WATER RATES AND APPLICATION 

OF SAME. 

Received from City of Boston fifty per cent, of 

Somerville water rates . . . . . . $77,640 91 

Balance. remaining from 1891 . ... . . 5,150 80 

Annual appropriation for water-works 

maintenance . . . . $20,000 00 
Annual appropriation for water-works 

extension 40,000 00 

Amount of water loan interest . . 15,730 00 
Balance for reduction of water debt in 

1893 . . . . . . 7,061 71 



$82,791 71 $82,791 71 
EXTENSION OF WORKS. 

The past year has been one of great activity in real estate 
development, many new streets having been laid out and built upon.. 
We have, therefore, been obliged to extend the water mains in many 
sections of the city for the accommodation of the newly improved 
property. In this work we have laid 8,891 feet of cast-iron pipe, of 
sizes ranging from three-quarters of an inch to sixteen inches in 
diameter. There are now about sixty-six miles of water mains in 
Somerville. 

The development of our vacant lands has now progressed so far 
it seems probable that the demands for extension of water mains will 
hereafter decrease gradually from year to year. That such a 
decrease has already commenced is shown by the fact that the length 
of mains extended in 1892 was 5,489 feet less than in 1891. It is cer- 
lainly to be hoped that this year's Water Board will be able to expend; 
tess money for piping new streets, as a largely increased appropria- 
tion is needed for removing the old cement-lined pipe, which is caus- 
ing so much trouble in all parts of the city. 

Twenty thousand and one feet (nearly four miles) of service 
pipes were laid during 1892, a large increase over the preceding year. 
Two hundred and forty-six feet of this pipe were laid for fire pur- 
poses, and were from two to four inches in diameter. Fire services 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 233 

were also laid for John P. Squire & Co., in length, eighty-four feet of 
six and ten inch pipe ; and for the New England Dressed Meat & 
Wool Co., 878 feet of two to ten inch pipe. The amount received 
for water services was $10,177.55, the average cost of house services 
having been $18.72. The entire cost of all service pipes is collected 
from the persons applying for the same. 

RELAYING WATER MAINS, 

During the year 1892 there were laid 23,509 feet (nearly five 
miles) of cast-iron pipe in place of cement-lined pipe removed. This 
was considerably more than double the length of pipe relaid in 1891. 
Included in the above mentioned work was the large and expensive 
job of taking up the cement pipe in portions of Somerville and Web- 
ster avenues, and putting down in its place twelve-inch cast-iron pipe. 
This enterprise was undertaken at the earnest request of the highway 
committee, who were desirous that the said avenues should be re- 
piped before the granite paving blocks were laid. It having been 
decided by the City Council that an expenditure of nearly $100,000 
should be made for paving the two avenues, we felt that the request 
of the committee was reasonable and proper. The committee desired 
that all the underground works and fixtures should be put into such a 
thoroughly sound condition as to render it unnecessary to disturb the 
pavement for many years. We found the old pipe in a much better 
-State of preservation than had been expected, and it would probably 
have done good service for several years. The job was an expensive 
one for the water department, costing, as it did, nearly $15,000. Our 
appropriation was so far reduced by this expenditure that we were 
obliged to postpone relaying many other streets which were in a far 
worse condition than the avenues in question. 

It is of prime importance that the work of taking up the defective 
and dangerous cement pipe, and replacing it with cast-iron mains, 
should be continued from year to year as rapidly as the appropriations 
therefor will permit. Considerable expense and great annoyance 
result from the frequent bursting of the old pipes, which have mani- 
festly outlived their usefulness. 

We estimate that it will be necessary to relay not less than 40,000 
feet of water mains during the present year, and we believe that at 
least $70,000 should be appropriated by the City Council for main- 



234 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

tenance and extension accounts. The income from water rates dur- 
ing 1893 will, doubtless, be sufficient to admit of such an appropria- 
tion and leave a balance in excess of the requirements for water loan 
interest. 

There were eighty-six breaks in the old cement-lined pipe during 
the past year, an increase of fifty-one over the year 1891. The 
breaks were in pipes of the following-named sizes: — 

In 3-inch mains . . . . . . 3 breaks. 

" 4-inch " 31 " 

"6-inch " . . . . . . 47 " 

" 8-inch " 5 " 

From information which we have received from the cities of Bos- 
ton and Cambridge, it appears that our water pipes are subject to a 
new danger, resulting from the action of the electric current conveyed 
bystreet railway and electric light wires. Specimens of iron and lead 
pipe may be seen at the City Hall in Cambridge, which exhibit 
strong proofs of the action of some destructive agent, and we are in-^ 
formed that the damaged pipe had been laid only a short time. The 
subject is being carefully investigated by experts, and should it be 
proved that our water mains and services are imperilled by the 
presence of underground electric currents, prompt measures will be 
adopted to remedy the evil and to obtain compensation for damage 
already done. Down to the present time, we have not discovered any 
injury to water pipes in Somerville which may be fairly attributed to 
electrical action. 

HYDRANTS. 

There are now in the city 535 hydrants, eighty-two new ones 
having been set during the past year, at a cost of about $4,100.00. 
From this amount should be deducted about $380.00, the approximate 
value of twenty old hydrants which have been removed. There has 
been a considerable expenditure for general repairs upon hydrants. 

We should recommend that the cost of hydrants, together with 
the expense of setting and repairing the same, be hereafter charged 
to the appropriation for fire department. Hydrants are for the ex- 
clusive use of the fire department, and are a part of the apparatus 
and fixtures employed solely for the extinguishment of fires. The 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 235 

iire department very properly pays the water rates assessed for 
hydrants, and there seems to be no good reason why the hydrants 
themselves should not come under the same rule. It is proper that 
our citizens should know just how much it costs from year to year to 
guard against and extinguish fires, and this cannot be clearly shown 
so long as the cost of hydrants and their maintenance is charged to 
the water department. 

We would also suggest the propriety of transferring to the com- 
mittee on fire department of the City Council the duty of purchasing 
hydrants and the supervision of their setting and maintenance. 
Under the present system, the committee on fire department has no 
authority to determine either the style, number, or location of 
hydrants, but is dependent upon the decision of the Water Board for 
the carrying out of its recommendations in the matter. Such a prac- 
tice is analogous to intrusting to the committee on public property 
the whole duty of purchasing general fire apparatus, a method which 
no one would think of sanctioning. 

The objections to a divided responsibility for, and jurisdiction 
over, hydrants were emphasized the past year in the case of the 
Sprague & Hathaway fire in West Somerville. At that fire it was 
found that at least one of the fire companies was not provided with 
a proper wrench for opening one of the principal hydrants near Davis 
:square, and, in consequence, there was a slight delay in getting a 
stream of water on the fire. Notwithstanding the hydrant in question 
was of an approved pattern and easy to operate, still it was suggested 
that it was of doubtful expediency to have more than one style of 
'-hydrant in use ; and the committee on fire department, in its late 
' special report to the City Council, relative to said fire, expressed the 
opinion that they, the said committee, " should have more voice in 
the matter of style and location of hydrants." We believe they 
should have sole voice in the matter; in fact, that they should be 
intrusted with the selection and purchase of hydrants, should super- 
vise setting and repairing the same, and all expenses connected there- 
with should be paid from their appropriation. 

The subject seems a proper one to receive the attention of the 
committee on ordinances, as the whole question is now in an unsettled 
and unsatisfactory condition. 



2S6 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



WATER FOR BUSINESS PURPOSES. 

During the past year we have been called upon to provide a 
supply of water for the New England Dressed Meat & Wool Com- 
pany. This corporation, which has lately commenced operations in 
our city, is likely to make use of large quantities of water each year,, 
paying therefor an amount which will add materially to the revenue 
of the water department. We base this prediction upon the fact that 
similar establishments in the same neighborhood have long been our 
largest consumers of water. During the year 1892 the North Pack- 
ing & Provision Company and John P. Squire & Company together 
paid water rates to the amount of $16,483.40, one-half of which 
amount was received by Somerville under the existing water contract 
with the city of Boston. This was a little more than one-tenth of 
the entire revenue from water rates. 

There may be some question, however, whether future water 
boards will consider it prudent to take on many more large con- 
sumers until assured of an increase of the water supply. As men- 
tioned elsewhere in this report, Mystic lake has been heavily drawn 
upon for several years, and during the last summer and autumn the 
water fell so low as to excite grave apprehensions in the minds of 
those conversant with all the circumstances. It became necessary to 
resort to the closest inspection to prevent waste and to enforce rigid 
restrictions as to the use of water upon lawns and in carriages houses. 
As the water supply is intended primarily for domestic and fire pur* 
poses, it would seem that families ought not to be unreasonably 
restricted in the consumption of water, while large manufacturing and 
business establishments are allowed to make use of unlimited quan- 
tities. 

It should also be remembered that the water in the lake becomes 
more impure as its volume is reduced ; or, in other words, that the 
impurities become more concentrated and offensive as the dilution is 
diminished. 

It would certainly be a great hardship upon our citizens to 
reduce the quantity and impair the quality of their water supply in 
order to make large sales of water to manufacturing and business 
industries. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 237 



HIGH-WATER SERVICE. 

The high-water service continues to give complete satisfaction, 
and it now seems surprising that its introduction should have been 
so long delayed. After two years' observation of the workings of 
the system, we are able to testify in unqualified terms to the great 
benefits derived therefrom. The standpipe, boiler, and pump have 
admirably stood the test of another year's trial, and are now doing 
excellent work. The appearance of the pump has been greatly im- 
proved of late by painting. The inner surface of the standpipe has 
also been cleaned and painted, at a cost of $127.38. 

No steps have yet been taken toward the purchase of a second 
boiler or land for an additional standpipe, as suggested in last year's 
report. Neither of these purchases could be made without an 
increased appropriation, and we did not feel like asking for that 
during the past year, — a year in which the funded debt of the city 
was increased more than $150,000. It will be wise to act in the 
matter at the earliest practicable opportunity. 

During the present year it will be necessary to enlarge the sheds 
at the pumping station ; and scales should be erected at the City 
Farm for weighing coal, water pipe, and other articles used by the 
water and highway departments. The only scales now owned by the 
city are located near Union square, and we have found it neither 
convenient nor economical to weigh out supplies in that part of the 
city. 

WATER SUPPLY. 



In our report for the year 1891, we expressed the opinion that it 
would be unwise for Somerville to enter into negotiations for the pur- 
chase of the Mystic water supply, and stated briefly some of the 
grounds on which the opinion was based. After another year's 
observation and investigation, with all due respect for the different 
views entertained by previous water boards, we are still more firmly 
convinced that the proposed purchase ought not to be made. The 
State Board of Health continues to express distrust as to the quality 



238 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

of the water for domestic uses, and the Boston Water Board itself, in 
a late special report to the Boston City Council, says: — 

" Regarding the Mystic water supplied to the people of Charles- 
town, this board has already expressed the opinion in its annual 
reports that it is not satisfactory as a permanent source of supply. 
Charlestown, however, has been piped for the introduction of Cochitu- 
ate and Sudbury water, which could be turned on at an hour's notice 
in case of an unfavorable change in the state of the Mystic supply." 

With such views concerning the future of the Mystic water,, it is 
not surprising that Boston should be desirous of selling its franchise 
to Somerville. It would, however, be strange if Somerville, in the 
light of all the facts, should be willing to abrogate her present water 
contract with Boston, and place her sole dependence for the future 
upon a water supply which has lost the confidence of those best 
informed as to its condition and prospects. 

There has been ,no marked change in the quality of the Mystic 
water during the past year. Analyses, made under the direction of 
the State Board of Health, show only a slight increase of impurities 
over the year 1891, and it is believed that this trifling change was not 
due to any real deterioration of the water, but rather to the fact that 
the objectionable elements became more concentrated by reason of 
the diminished quantity of water in the lake. For several months, 
owing to increased consumption and scanty rain-fall, the water in the 
lake was unusually low. As Charlestown will soon be transferred 
from the Mystic to the Cochituate and Sudbury supply, the consump- 
tion of Mystic water is not likely to increase for several years. 

It has long been known that the Mystic water was not of a high 
standard of purity. Boston has expended large sums of money for 
constructing sewers, establishing filtering plants, and for other enter- 
prises calculated to improve the character of the water. These 
efforts have been of great value, and without them the Mystic supply 
would long since have been abandoned for domestic uses. A plan is 
now under consideration by the city of Boston and the town of Win- 
chester for laying out a park along the course of the Abbajona river. 
If the measure is carried out, Mystic lake will be relieved from some 
of the most offensive matter now flowing into it. It would seem as if 
far better and more permanent results might be obtained by Boston 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 239 

and her suburbs by a large outlay for a new metropolitan water sup- 
ply coming from a locality remote from centres of population than 
can be expected from the heavy expenditures made for improvements 
of present supplies. At least, it might be wise for Boston to unite 
with adjacent cities and towns in asking the legislature to appoint a 
commission to thoroughly investigate the subject, and report thereon 
at an early date. We learn that a bill has been submitted at the 
present session of the legislature, providing for the appointment by 
the governor of three persons, one of whom shall be a hydraulic 
engineer, to consider the whole question of water supply throughout 
the Commonwealth. By the provisions of the bill very broad scope 
is given to the investigations of the commissioners, including the ques- 
tion of connecting the water supplies of various cities and towns so 
that they may be used interchangeably in case of necessity. As the 
lakes and rivers within the State are, in a general way, the common 
property of all the people, it would seem feasible and just that some 
broad plan should be adopted by which no one municipality should 
obtain undue advantage over its neighbors in securing water rights. 
We would suggest that authority be given to the city solicitor and the 
Water Board to represent the interests of Somerville at all hearings 
which may be given at the State House upon the proposed bill, or 
other legislation touching the water question. 

We cannot resist the conviction that Boston and neighboring 
municipalities are not giving the searching and intelligent considera- 
tion to the water question which its importance demands. It is true 
that immense sums of money have been expended to procure and 
improve public water supplies, but the results indicate that much of 
the work has been hastily and injudiciously performed, and, in par- 
ticular, that insufficient attention has been given to procuring drink- 
ing water of unquestioned purity and wholesomeness. Water is an 
article of daily consumption by all the people, and its quality, when 
used as a beverage, should be absolutely above suspicion. Not only 
the health, but the morals of a community are, in a measure, depend- 
ent upon the character of its drinking water. If Nature's beverage 
was supplied to the public in a pure and palatable condition, the 
resort to intoxicating and narcotic drinks would be greatly diminished. 

No well-informed person believes that the present water supply 
of Boston, either as to quantity or quality, will meet the requirements 
of the near future. The watersheds of both the Cochituate and Sud- 



240 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ft 

bury systems embrace populous towns, whose natural drainage is 
into the lake and stream from which Boston takes her drinking water. 
Only a complete and enormously expensive system of sewerage can 
divert the impurities which now find their way into the water. Should 
an adequate sewer system be constructed, either the surface water, 
including street washings, must be allowed to flow in its natural 
channels, or it must be conducted into the sewers, thereby greatly 
diminishing the quantity of the water supply. The money which 
will be required to divert impurities from the Cochituate and Sudbury 
river waters would go a long way towards securing a supply naturally 
pure and remote from sources of contamination. 

It has often been suggested that Boston might join with other 
Massachusetts cities and towns in an endeavor to secure a water 
supply from the ^' Lake Country " of New Hampshire. Such a plan 
is certainly worthy of the most careful study and investigation. It is 
true that great obstacles would need to be overcome and great 
expense would be incurred in carrying out such a project, but other 
municipalities have successfully engaged in undertakings of like 
magnitude. ''Modern Athens" may turn to Ancient Rome for 
examples of wisdom and liberality in furnishing sweet and potable 
water for the people. In the first century of our era the Emperor 
Claudius constructed two magnificent aqueducts, one forty-five miles 
and the other sixty-two miles in length, to convey water to Rome. In 
modern times many gigantic undertakings have been carried out for 
the purpose of obtaining an abundance of pure water. Glasgow 
brings her water from Loch Katrine in an aqueduct thirty-five miles 
long, in the building of which the most stupendous obstacles were 
surmounted. Vienna's principal aqueduct is fifty-six and one-half 
miles in length, while Paris conveys her water through a conduit for 
a distance of 110 miles. Croton water was introduced into New 
York in 1842, when the population numbered about 450,000. The 
Croton aqueduct, which conducts water from Croton lake, or reser- 
voir, to the American metropolis, is nearly forty miles in length. 

With the advancement which has been made in the last half 
century in hydraulic engineering, it would be a comparatively easy 
task to bring an abundance of water from Lake Winipiseogee to 
Boston. In the matter of expense, it would, probably, not be more 
burdensome to the rich New England metropolis and the cities and 
towns which would gladly join with her in the enterprise than it was 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 241 

for the city of Portland to take water from Sebago lake. Much of 
the opposition which would inevitably be encountered from the New 
Hampshire authorities might possibly be overcome by an arrange- 
ment for allowing the cities and towns along the line of the main 
conduits to share in the supply of water. By the building of 
capacious reservoirs along the way for the storage of water in 
times of abundant supply, the injury to riparian rights would be 
reduced to a minimum. 

It is estimated that there is a population of about 900,000 resid- 
ing within ten miles of the State House. This population is likely to 
double within the next twenty years. It is the opinion of those best 
informed on the subject that all the available waters, within what has 
hitherto been deemed a reasonable distance from Boston, are insuffi- 
cient for a population of 1,500,000. Confronted with such a condition 
of things, it would seem as if no time should be lost by Boston and 
her suburbs in taking preliminary steps towards securing a permanent 
-and satisfactory water supply from a more remote source than has yet 
been resorted to. 

The foregoing suggestions, relative to the general subject of water 
supply, are incorporated into this report for the purpose of drawing 
attention to a matter which must soon receive the careful and intelli- 
gent consideration of our people. We have discussed the question 
from the Boston standpoint chiefly, for the reason that Somerville is 
dependent upon Boston for her water, and the richer and more popu- 
lous city must take the initiative in any movement for obtaining a new 
metropolitan water supply. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, we desire to thank the superintendent, clerk, 
engineer, and all other officers and employees of the water department 
for the fidelity and zeal with which they have performed their various 
duties and labors during the p^st year. 

ALBION A. PERRY. 
GEORGE D. WEMYSS. 
GEORGE A. KIMBALL. 



242 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Somerville Mystic Water Board: — 

Gentlemen, — The annual report of the superintendent of the 
Somerville Mystic works is respectfully submitted, giving a detailed 
account of all work performed during the year 1892. The tables 
hereto annexed show the sizes and locations of extensions of main 
pipe and of the pipe relaid, and also the hydrants, standpipes, and 
drinking fountains set. 

The inventory of stock and tools on hand is included. 

DISTRIBUTION MAINS. 



The most important work done was the taking out of the old eight- 
inch cement main on Somerville avenue from Cambridge line to Cen- 
tral street, and the laying of twelve-inch cast-iron pipe in its place. 

Laterals of cast-iron pipe were laid and connected with the mains 
in all of the side streets on the line of this pipe, thus removing from 
the principal business portion of our main thoroughfare an element 
of great danger, and one causing much anxiety to those having the: 
water works in charge. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



243 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION OF MAINS RELAID DURING 

THE YEAR. 











Diameter 


Street. 


From. 


To. 


Length 
in 


IN Inches. 


Feet. 












New. 


Old. 


Allen St. . . . 


Somerville Ave. . 


Southwesterly 


55 


8 


4 


Aldersey St. 


Vinal Ave. . . 


Southeasterly 


29 


6 


4 


Avon St. . . 


School St. . . 


Northwesterly 


19 


8 


4 


Bartlett St. . . 


Washington St. . 


Southerly . . . 


3 


2 


3 


Berkeley St. 


School St. . . 


Northwesterly 


22 


6 


4 


Bonner Ave. 


Columbus Ave. . 


Washington St. . 


382 


8 


6 


*Bonner Ave. 






7 
8 


6 

8 


_ 


Bow St, . . . 


Somerville Ave. . 


Easterly . . . 


6 


Carleton St. 


Somerville Ave. . 


Southwesterly 


6 


6 


4 


Central St. . . 


Somerville Ave. . 


Northeasterly 


30 


12 


12 


Charles St. . . 


Washington St. . 


Southerly . . . 


236 


6 


4 


■Chestnut St. 


Poplar St. . . 


Southeasterly 


456 


6 


4 


Church St. . . 


Somerville Ave. . 


Southwesterly 


41 


6 


4 


Church St. . 


Summer St. . . 


Southwesterly 


44 


6 


4 


Columbus Ave. 


150 ft. east of 


150 ft. east of Bon- 










Walnut St. 


ner Ave. . . 


919 


8 


6 


*Columbus Ave. 






14 

78 


6 
12 


_ 


Dane St. . . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Southwesterly 


6 


Dane St. . . 


Washington St. . 


Fitchburg R. R. 


771 


12 


6 


*Dane St. . . . 






11 

38 


6 

6 


_ 


Dane Ct. 


bane St. . . '. 


Easterly . . . 


4 


Dickinson St. . 


Springfield St. 


Westerly . . . 


3 


4 


4 


Fitchburg St. . 


Somerville Ave. 


Northeasterly 


6 


6 


6 


Florence St. 


Washington St. . 


Northerly . . . 


26 


8 


6 


Franklin Ave. . 


Washington St. . 


Northerly . . . 


26 


6 


3 


Franklin Ct. . 


Somerville Ave. 


Northeasterly 


6 


2 


2 


Frost Ave. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Southwesterly 


53 


8 


4 


Granite St. . 


Somerville Ave. 


Northeasterly 


31 


6 


2 


Grand View Ave. 


Vinal Ave. 


15 ft. west of Wal- 












nut St. . . . 


542 


6 


4 


Greenville St. . 


Medford St. . . 


Boston St. . . 


403 


8 


4 


"*Greenville St. . 






15 
3 


6 
6 





Hanson St. . . 


Washington St. . 


Northerly . . . 


4 


Hamlet St. . . 


Highland Ave. . 


Southwesterly 


479 


6 


4 


Haskell Ct. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Southwesterly 


11 


6 


6 


Highland Ave. 


Walnut St. . . 


Medford St. . . 


569 


12 


8 


Homer Sq. . . 


Bonner Ave. . 


Westerly . . . 


5 


6 


4 


Houghton St. . 


Springfield St. 


Southeasterly 


2 


6 


4 


Knapp St. . . 


School St. . . 


Northwesterly . 


3 


6 


4 



* Hydrant branch. 



>44 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION OF MAINS RELAID DURINa 

THE Y¥.h\<.— Conti7inecl. 











Diameter 








Length 


IN Inches. 


Street. 


From. 


To. 


in 
















Feet. 


New. 


Old. 


Laurel St. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Northeasterly 


18 


6 


4 


Linden St. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Charlestown St. 


( 343 
\ 296 

8 

28 


8 
6 


6 


*Linden St. . . 






4 
6 




Loring St. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Northeasterly 


4 


Malloy Ct. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Southwesterly 


85 


6 


4 


Medford St. 


Washington St. . 


Highland Ave. . 


1,655 


12 


8 


Medford St. 


East side Wash- 


West side Wash- 










ington St. . . 


ington St. . . 


78 


10 


8 


*Medford St. 






( 13 
\ 15 


8 
6 


— 








— 


Murray St. . . 


Washington St. . 


Southerly . . . 


222 


6 


3. 


Mt. Vernon St. 


Washington St. . 


Northerly . . . 


36 


8 


6 


Mystic St. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Northerly . . . 


27 


8 


4 


Newton St. . . 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Southwesterly 


70 


12 


4 


Oxford St. . . 


School St. . . 


Northwesterly 


13 


6 


4 


Park St. . . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Southwesterly 


78 


12 


6- 


Pinckney St. 


Washington St. . 


Northerly . . . 


29 


8 


6 


Poplar St. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Northeasterly 


6 


6 


6 


Prosp't Hill Ave. 


Medford St. . . 


Westerly . . . 


2 


8 


6 


Prospect St. 


Somerville Ave. 


Bennett Ct. . . 


( 100 
\ 242 


16 
6 


6 


Prescott St. . . 


Summer St. . . 


Northeasterly 


17 


8 


6 


Preston St. , 


School St. . . 


Northwesterly 


3 


6 


6. 


Putnam St. . 


Summer St. . 


Highland Ave. . 


1,346 


6 


4 


*Putnam St. . 






6 

50 


4 

6 


_ 


Quincy St. . 


Summer St. . 


Southwesterly 


4 


Quincy St. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Northeasterly 


35 


6 


4 


School St. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Near Highland 












Ave 


],960 


10 


4 


*School St. . . 






34 

58 


6 
.6 





Sherman St. 


Somerville Ave. 


Southwesterly 


1 


Skehan St. . 


Dane St. . . . 


Westerly . . . 


24 


6 


4 


Somerville Ave. 


Near East Cam- 












bridge Line 


Northwesterly 


45 


6 


8 


Somerville Ave. 


70 ft. west of E. 












Cambridge Line 


Medford St. . . 


2,350 


12 


8 


Somerville Ave. 


Medford St. . . 


Mansfield St. . . 


275 


16 


8 


Somerville Ave. 


Hawkins St. . . 


Carleton St. . . 


538 


10 


8 


Somerville Ave. 


Carleton St. . . 


Central St. . . 


2,140 


12 


8 


Somerville Ave. 


Fitchburg R. R. 


John P. Squire's 


1 1 


12 


6 






Works . . . 


8 


6 


Somerville Ave. 


East side Med- 


West side Med- 










ford St. . . 


ford St. . . . 


55 


14 


8 



* Hydrant branch. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



245 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION OF MAINS RELAID DURING 

THE YY.hK. — Concluded. 



Street. 


From. 


To. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


DiAM 

IN In 

New. 


ETER 
CHES. 

Old. 


*Somerville Ave. 






( 152 

\ 15 

786 

12 

1,082 

30 

298 

462 

56 

700 

6 

18 

770 

688 

11 

15 

15 

2 

618 

28 

60 
15 


6 

4 

8 

6 
10 

6J 

8; 

6 

6 

8 

6 

6^ 
12 
10 

6 
10 

6 

4 

12 

16 

14 
6 


_- 


Springfield St. . 
*Springfield St. . 


Concord Ave. 


Cambridge Line 


4 


Summer St. 
*Summer St. 


Bow St. ... 


School St. . . 


6 


Temple St. . . 
Thorpe PI. . . 
Vine St. . . . 
Vinal Ave. . . 
*Vinal Ave. . . 


Sydney St. . . 
Highland Ave. . 
Somerville Ave. 
Highland Ave. . 


Easterly . . . 
Southwesterly 
Southwesterly 
Near Aldersey St. 


8 
3 
4 
6 


Village St. . . 

Washington St. 

Washington St. 

^Washington St. 


Dane St. . . . 
Charlestown Line 
Dane St. . . . 


Northwesterly 
Myrtle St. . . . 
Beacon St. . . 


4 

8 


Walnut St. . . 
Warren Ave. 
Waverly St. 
Webster Ave. . 

Webster Ave. . 

Webster Ave. . 

*Webster Ave. . 


Highland Ave. . 
Union Sq. 
Washington St. . 
Union Sq. . . 

North line New- 
ton St. . . . 

South line New- 
ton St. . . . 


Northeasterly 
Northeasterly 
Southerly . . . 
North line New- 
ton St. . . . 
South line New- 
ton St. . . . 

Fitchburg R. R. 


4 

6. 

2' 

6 
6 
6 











* Hydrant branch. 



iLti^^ m^.^ 



^46 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION OF MAINS EXTENDED 

DURING THE YEAR. 



Street. 



*Alpine St. 
*Arthur St. . 

Avon St. 
*Berkeley St. 

Benton Ave. 

Blaikie St. . 
*Broadway 

Caldwell PI. 
*Campbell Pk. 

Carver St. . 

Chestnut St. 



Cook St. . . 

Cypress St. . 

-*Derby St. . . 

Eliot St. . , . 

Ellington Road 

Elm St. . . . 

*Elm St. . . . 
tElmwood St. 



*Elmwood St. 

Fanning Ave. . 
*Flint St. . . . 
*Fountain Ave. . 

Oilman Terrace 

Glover Circle . 

Hancock St. 

Hanson Ct. 

Henry Ave. 

*Highland Ave. . 

Hinckley St. 

Jenny Lind Ave. 
*Jenny Lind Ave. 

Josephine Ave. . 

Kenwood St. 

Kidder Ave. 
*Kingston St. 

Knowlton St. 
*Knowlton St. 

Lesley Ave. . 

Lester PI. 

Mansfield St. . 
*Marshall St. '. 
"*Merriam St. 



From. 



Central St. 



Hudson St. 
Somerville 



Ave. 



Washington St. 



Porter St. . . 
A point 438 ft. s.e. 
of Poplar St. . 
South Wyatt St. 
Beech St. . 



Vine St. . . 
Highland Ave. 
Kenwood St. 



Apoint475ft. s.w. 
of Holland St. 



Highland Ave. 



Pearl St. . . . 
Meacham St. 
Pipe laid in 1891 
Hanson St. 
Highland Ave. . 



Angle in street . 
Pipe laid in 1888 



Morrison Ave. . 
Pipe laid in 1891 
Pipe laid in 1890 



Pipe laid in 1891 



Highland Ave. . 
Meacham St. 
Somerville Ave. 



To. 



Southeasterly 



Highland Ave. 
Northeasterly 



Southerly . . 

Northwesterly 

Southeasterly 
Westerly . . 
Central St. 



Northwesterly 
Northeasterly 
Near Broadway 



Southwesterly 
Lexington Ave. 



Northeasterly 
Southeasterly 
Northeasterly 
Easterly . . 
Lexington Ave. 



Southwesterly 
Northwesterly 



Northeasterly 
Billingham St. 
Liberty Ave. . 

Northeasterly 



Lexington Ave. 

Northwesterly 

Northeasterly 



Length 
IN Feet. 



12 

7 
187 

7 

315 

128 

10 

230 

7 
170 

100 

182 
275 
7 
126 
242 
366 
41 

243 

14 

410 

7 

6 

348 

144 

108 

163 

325 

14 

16 

106 

48 

12 

363 

205 

350 

7 

96 

7 

373 

217 

96 

18 

7 



Diameter 
IN Inches. 



4 

6 

10 

6 

8 
2 
6 

li 

6 

6 

6 
6 



6 

16 

6 



* Hydrant branch. 



t Cement pipe. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



24T 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION OF MAINS EXTENDED 
DURING THE YY.K'^.— Concluded. 



Street. 



Miner St. 
*Morrison St. 

Morton St. . 

Mt. Vernon Ave 
*Mt. Vernon St 

Newton St. . 

Olive Ave. . 
Pinckney PI. 
Pumping Station 

Rossmore St. . 

*Rossmore St. . 

Sewall Ct. . . 

Somerville Ave. 

*Stickney Ave . 

Stone Ave. . . 

*Stone Ave. . . 

*Sydney St. . . 

Tennyson St. . 

Thorndike St. . 

*Thorndike St. . 

*Virginia St. . . 
^Washington St. 

West St. . . . 
*Willow Ave. 

Windoni St. 

Winslow Ave. . 



From. 



Pipe laid in 1891 



Knowlton St. 
Heath St. 



East side Web 

ster Ave. 
Linden Ave. . 

Pinckney St. 

Relief valve . 

Pipe laid in 1889 

Sewall St. 
Mossland St. 



Somerville Ave. 



Medford St. . . 
Pipe laid in 1885 



Highland Ave. 



Summer St. 
Grove St. . 



To. 



Vernon St. 



Glen St. . . 
Northwesterly 



West side Web 

ster Ave. 
Southeasterly 

Easterly . . 

18 in. low service 

main . . . . 

Northerly . . . 

Southwesterly 
Northwesterly 



Northeasterly 



Northeasterly 
Kingston St. . 



Northeasterly 



Elm St. . . 
Southwesterly 



Length 
IN Feet. 



163 

7 

341 

125 



24 

188 

124 

30 

14 
93 

121 
201 

7 

31 

12 

6 

240 

330 

12 

7 

52 

211 

27 

270 

125 



Diameter 
IN Inches. 



16 
6 
2 
1 



* Hydrant branch. 



248 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

I would especially call your attention to the condition of pipe in 
the streets mentioned in the following table. No less than eighty- 
six breaks occurred during the past year, being an increase of thirty- 
five breaks over that of last year. When these are uncovered they 
will be found to be in a perilous condition. 

As much as possible of the old cement-lined pipe should be 
removed each season and cast-iron pipe substituted. By so doing, 
and by employing strong material for new work, a marked diminution 
in the number of bursts and leaks will be observable and greater 
safety secured in case of fire. 

There were on these mains the following bursts : — 

hree were on the 3-inch mains ; 31 were on the 4-inch mains ; 
47 were on the 6-inch mains; 5 were on the 8-inch mains. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



249 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION AND SIZES OF NEW MAINS PROPOSED TO- 
BE LAID IN PLACE OF CEMENT PIPE WHICH IS UNFIT FOR USE. 



Street. 


From. 


To. 


4// 


^ff 


8// 


10// 


12// 


20// 


Adams St. . . 


High Service . 


Medford St. . 


. 




600/ 








Appleton St. . 


Willow Ave. 


Clifton St. . . 


- 


630/ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Beech St. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Spring St. . . 


- 


- 


800/ 


- 


- 


- 


Belmont St. 


Somerville Ave. 


Summer St. . 


- 


- 


1,300/ 


- 


- 


- 


Bonair St. . . 


Cross St. . . . 


Walnut St. . 


- 


- 


- 


1,450/ 


- 


. 


Brook St. . . 


Cross St. . . . 


Glen St. . . 


- 


500/ 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


Broadway . . 


Charlestown Line 


Marshall St. . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4,800/ 


- 


Chester St. . . 


Elm St. . . , 


Orchard St. . 


- 


800/ 


- 


- 


. 


_ 


Clifton St. . . 


Morrison St. 


Appleton St. 


- 


240/ 


. 


- 


- 


_ 


Cottage Ave. . 


Chester St. . . 


Russell St. . 


- 


500/ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Craigie St. . . 


Elm St. . . . 


Summer St. . 


- 


- 


1,250/ 


- 


- 


- 


Crescent St. 


Washington St. 


Pearl St. . . 


- 


650/ 


- 


- 


- 


— 


Cross St. . . 


Pearl St. . . . 


Tufts St. . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,100/- 


Day St. . . . 


Davis Sq. . . 


Orchard St. . 


- 


- 


940/ 


- 


- 


- 


Dover St. . . 


Davis Sq. . . 


Orchard St. . 


- 


- 


940/ 


- 


- 


- 


Elm St. . . . 


Davis Sq. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4,400/ 


_ 


Evergreen Ave. 


Marshall St. 


Sycamore St. . 


- 


1,320/ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Grove St. . , 


Highland Ave. . 


Elm St. . . 


- 


- 


600/ 


- 


- 


- 


Hanson St. . . 


Vine St. . . . 


Durham St. . 


- 


550/ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Herbert St. . . 


Chester St. . . 


Day St. . . 


- 


360/ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Heath St. . . 


Temple St. . . 


Moreland St. . 


- 


- 


1.800/ 


- 


- 


- 


Irving St. . . 


Holland St. . . 


Broadway . . 


- 


- 


1,800/ 


- 


- 


-. 


Meacham St. . 


Orchard St. . . 


Dead End . . 


- 


- 


800/ 


- 


- 


- 


Marshall St. . 


Oilman Sq. . . 


Broadway . . 


- 


- 


- 


1,650/ 


- 


- 


Mills St. . . 


Walnut St. . . 


Sargent Ave. . 


- 


570/ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Medford St. . 


Central St. . . 


School St. . . 


- 


- 


- 


1,525/ 


- 


- 


Mossland St. , 


Somerville Ave. 


Elm St. . . 


- 


- 


. 


- 


350/ 


. 


Newbury St. . 


Holland St. . . 


Cambridge Line 


- 


1,250/ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Nevada Ave. . 


Village St. . . 


Hanson St. 


- 


200/ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Newton St. . . 


Prospect St. . . 


Webster Ave. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


450/ 


- 


Orchard St. . . 


Russell St. . . 


Meacham St. . 


- 


- 


1,350/ 


— 


- 


- 


Otis St. . . . 


Wigglesworth St. 


Cross St. . . 


- 


- 


1,200/ 


- 


- 


- 


Oxford St. . . 


Central St. . . 


School St. . . 


- 


1,330/ 


- 


- 


- 


-- 


Park St. . . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Beacon St. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,300/ 


-. 


Prospect St. 


Washington St. 


Newton St. . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


400/ 


- 


Rush St. . . 


Broadway . . 


Flint St. . . 


- 


- 


- 


400/ 


- 




Sargent Ave. . 


Broadway . . 


Mills St. . . 


- 


522/ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Shawmut St. . 


Washington St. 


Cross St. . . 


- 


- 


550/ 


- 


- 


- 


Shawmut PI. . 


Shawmut St. 


AUston St. 


_ 


200/ 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


Spring St. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Summer St. . 


- 


- 


1,200/ 


- 


- 


- 


Somerville Ave. 


Central St. . . 


Elm St. . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,900/ 


- 


Summer St. 


Willow Ave. 


Elm St. . . 


- 


- 


1,100/ 


- 


_ 


_ 


Temple St. . . 


Broadway . . 


Jaques St. . . 


- 


- 


1,000/ 


- 


- 


- 


Tufts St. . . 


Cross St. . . . 


Washington St. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 000/ 


Tyler St. . . 


Dane St. . . . 


Vine St. . . 


504^" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Village St. . . 


Dane St. . . . 


Vine St. . . 


370/ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Vine St. . . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Village St. . 


- 


- 


800/ 


- 


- 


_ 


Walnut St. . . 


Pearl St. . . . 


Bonair St. . . 


- 


- 


800/ 


- 


_ 


_ 


Wallace St. . . 


Holland St. . . 


Broadway . . 


- 


- 


1,350/ 


- 


_ 


_ 


Warren Ave. . 


Columbus Ave. 


Bow St. . . 


- 


650/ 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


WigglesworthSt. 


Bonair St. . . 


Pearl St. . . 


- 


740/ 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


Willow Ave. 


Appleton St. 


Elm St. . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,075/ 


- 


Washington St. 


Medford St. . . 


Bonner Ave. . 


- 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


1 100/ 



250 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



HYDRANTS. 

Daring the past year the hydrants have received especial 
■care, and a large number of them have been thoroughly repaired. 

In extremely cold weather they have required constant at- 
tention and much labor to insure their proper condition for use 
in case of fire. 

The number of hydrants taken out and repaired and reset, 20 

. . . . . 82 

. . . . 20 

62 



New hydrants set 
Hydrants removed 
Making a net increase of 



Fourteen have been repaired at the shops with new valves 
and gaskets, and others have had new standard bolts and nuts, 
and have been set in new locations. 

The whole number of hydrants in the city is 535, of which 
twenty are private hydrants. 

The following hydrants were set during the year : — 

Adams street, corner of Broadway. 
Alpine street, 280 feet east of Cedar street. 
Alpine street, 670 feet east of Cedar street. 
Arthur street, 29 feet south of Broadway. 
Berkeley street, 212 feet west of Hersey street. 
• Bonner avenue, opposite Homer square. 

Broadway, 50 feet east of Mt. Pleasant street. 
Campbell park, 255 feet west of Meacham street. 
Charles street, 183 feet south of Washington street. 
Columbus avenue, 35 feet west of Stone avenue. 
Columbus avenue, 150 feet east from Bonner avenue. 
Chestnut street, 538 feet south of Poplar street. 
Chestnut street, 246 feet south of Poplar street. 
Dane street, 172 feet north of Washington street. 
Dane street, 55 feet north of Skehan street. 
Derby street, 399 feet east of Temple street. 
Elm street, near Broadway. 
Elm street, 25 feet west of Russell street. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 251 

Elm wood street, 450 feet south of Holland street. 
Elm street, corner of Cedar street. 
Fountain avenue, 280 feet west of Glen street. 
Greenville street, 148 feet north of Boston street. 
Greenville street, 33 feet north of High street. 
Highland avenue, 72 feet west of Vinal avenue. 
Highland avenue, 278 feet west of Walnut street. 
Hamlet street, 321 feet south of Highland avenue. 
Jaques street, 362 feet east of Temple street. 
Jenny Lind avenue, 16 feet north of Vernon street. 
Jenny Lind avenue, 467 feet north of Vernon street. 
Kingston street, 402 feet west of Meacham street. 
Kingston court, 214 feet west of Meacham street. 
Knowlton street, opposite Morton street. 
Malloy court, 16 feet south of Somerville avenue. 
Marshall street, 200 feet south of Broadway. 
Medford street, opposite Chester avenue. 
Medford street, 34 feet south of Central square. 
Medford street, 13 feet west of Prospect Hill avenue.. 
Merriam street, 42 feet north of Charlestown street. 
Morrisoii street, 13 feet west of Newbern street. 
Miner street, 142 feet, north of Vernon street. 
Mt. Vernon street, corner of Broadway. 
Rossmore street, 260 feet south of Washington street.. 
School street, 61 feet north of Knapp street. 
School street, 93 feet south of Preston street. 
School street, 100 feet south of Summer street. 
School street, 14 feet north of Avon street. 
School street, 88 feet north of Oxford street. 
Somerville avenue, 100 feet north of Cambridge line- 
Somerville avenue, 260 feet north of Franklin court. 
Somerville avenue, 100 feet north of Fitchburg R. R.. 
Somerville avenue, 86 feet south of Poplar street. 
Somerville avenue, 121 feet south of Medford street.. 
Somerville avenue, 88 feet west of Quincy street. 
Somerville avenue, 113 feet east of Dane street. 



252 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Somerville avenue, 105 feet east of Carleton street. 
Somerville avenue, 40 feet west of Lowell street. 
Somerville avenue, 181 feet west of Mossland street. 
Springfield street, 140 feet south of Concord avenue. 
Springfield street, 21 feet south of Dickinson street. 
Springfield street, 120 feet north of Cambridge line. 
Stickney avenue, 212 feet west of Marshall street. 
Summer street, 8 feet east of School street. 
Summer street, opposite east line of School street. 
Summer street, 6 feet west of Vinal avenue. 
Sydney street, 412 feet east of Temple street. 
Thorpe place, 280 feet south of Highland avenue. 
Thorndike street, south of B. & L. R. R. 
Virginia street, 45 feet west of Aldrich street. 
Washington street, 45 feet north of Beacon street. 
Washington street, 69 feet west of Crescent street. 
Washington street, corner of Mt. Vernon street. 
Washington street, 50 feet east of Shawmut street (south 
side). 

Webster avenue, 96 feet south of Union square. 
Webster avenue, 12 feet south of Everett street. 
Webster avenue, 25 feet north of Newton street. 
West street, corner of Highland avenue. 
West street, 144 feet north of Highland avenue. 
Willow avenue, 250 feet north of Highland avenue. 
Putnam street, 308 feet north of Summer street. 
Putnam street, 608 feet north of Summer street. 
Putnam street, 116 feet south of Highland avenue. 
Runey street, 18 feet west of Flint avenue. 

The following hydrants were abandoned during the year ; — 

Broadway, near Adams street. 
Chestnut street, 430 feet south of Poplar street. 
Columbus avenue, 142 feet east of Bonner avenue. 
Dane street, 112 feet south of Skehan street. 
Elm street, corner of Cedar street. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 263 

Highland avenue, 87 feet east of Vinal avenue. 

Highland avenue, opposite West street. 

Jaques street, opposite Glines School. 

Jenny Lind avenue, 16 feet north of Yernon street. 

Kingston court, dead end. 

Medford street, 18 feet east of Prospect Hill avenue. 

Merriam street, 15 feet north of Charlestown street. 

School street, 6 feet south of Avon street. 

School street, 15 feet south of Preston street. 

Somerville avenue, corner of School street. 

Somerville avenue, 30 feet south of Poplar street. 

Somerville avenue, 40 feet west of Lowell street. 

Springfield street, 20 feet south of Houghton street. 

Washington street, corner of Mt. Vernon street. 

Webster avenue, 12 feet south of Everett street. 



Table SHOWING THE LOCATION OF EXISTING 
HYDRANTS January 1, 1893. 

Adams street, corner of Broadway. 
Adams street, 240 feet south of Broadway. 
Adams street, 300 feet north of Medford street. 
Adrian street, 118 feet east of Marion street. 
Adrian street, 220 feet south of Joseph street. 
Allen street, 9 feet north of Charlestown street. 
Albion street, 78 feet west of Central street. 
Albion street, 312 feet west of Central street. 
Albion street, 234 feet east of Lowell street. 
Albion street, 421 feet east of Cedar street. 
Alpine street, 280 feet east of Cedar street. 
Alpine street, 670 feet east of Cedar street. 
Allston street, 12 feet west of Shawmut place. 
Appleton street, corner of Clifton street. 
Artliur street, 29 feet south of Broadway. 
Auburn avenue, 519 feet west of Cross street. 
Austin street, 82 feet south of Mystic avenue. 



254 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



HYDRANT LOCATION. 

Austin street, 66 feet north of Benedict street. 
Avon street, 585 feet west of School street. 
Beacon street, 300 feet east of west end of street. 
Beacon street, 84 feet east of Harris street. 
Beacon street, 46 feet west of Sacramento street. 
Beacon street, 15 feet west of Kent street. 
Beacon street, corner of Ivaloo street. 
Beacon street, 72 feet east of Park street. 
Beacon street, 22 feet east of Durham street. 
Beacon street, 260 feet east of Washington street. 
Beacon street, 219 feet west of Cooney street. 
Beacon street, 222 feet west of Buckingham street.. 
Beech street, corner of Spring street. 
Behuont street, 554 feet south of Highland avenue. 
Belmont street, 228 feet north of Pitman street. 
Belmont street, 255 feet north of Summer street. 
Benedict street, 34 feet east of Mystic street. 
Berkeley street, 8 feet east of Central street. 
Berkeley street, 213 feet east of Hersey street. 
Berkeley street, 28 feet west of School street. 
Berkeley street, 212 feet west of Hersey street. 
Billingham street, 129 feet north of William street.. 
Bonair street, opposite Autumn street. 
Bonair street, 62 feet east of Walnut street. 
Bonner avenue, opposite Homer square. 
Boston street, 90 feet west of Bigelow street. 
Boston street, 213 feet east of Bigelow street. 
Boston street, north corner of High street. 
Bow street, 125 feet west of Union square. 
Bow street, junction of Summer street. 
Bow street, opposite Bow-street place. 
Bowdoin street, 68 feet north of Fremont avenue- 
Broadway, 50 feet east of Mt. Pleasant street. 
Broadway, 28 feet west of George street. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



255 



HYDRANT LOCATION. 



Broadway, 21 feet west of Broadway place. 
Broadway, corner of Glen street. 
Broadway, 15 feet west of Cross street. 
Broadway, 33 feet west of Walnut street. 
Broadway, 250 feet west of Edmands street. 
Broadway, 174 feet west of Grant street. 
Broadway, opposite Marshall street. 
Broadway, corner of School street. 
Broadway, opposite School street. 
Broadway, corner of Thurston street. 
Broadway, 240 feet east of Central street. 
Broadway, 13 feet west of Norwood avenue. 
Broadway, 324 feet west of Hinckley street. 
Broadway, 424 feet west of Hinckley street. 
Broadway, opposite Cedar street. 
Broadway, 180 feet west of Wilson avenue. 
Broadway, 40 feet west of Packard avenue. 
Broadway, 180 feet east of Endicott avenue. 
Broadway, 175 feet east of North street. 
Broadway, 415 feet west of North street. 
Broadway, east corner of Mt. Vernon street. 
Broadway, west corner of Franklin street. 
Brook street, 18 feet west of Rush street. 
Buckingham street, west corner of Dimick street. 
Bennett street, 150 feet east of Prospect street. 
Cameron avenue, opposite Mead street. 
Cameron avenue, 438 feet south of Mead street. 
Cedar street, 289 feet north of Elm street. 
Cedar street, 90 feet north of Sawtell avenue. 
Cedar street, 50 feet north of Hall street. 
Cedar street, 14 feet north of Highland avenue. 
Cedar street, 14 feet north of Albion street. 
Cedar street, 124 feet south of WarAvick street. 
Cedar street, 50 feet north of Clyde street. 



256 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



HYDRANT LOCATION. 



Cedar street, 24 feet south of Murdock street. 
Cedar street, 270 feet south of Broadway. 
Cedar street, 20 feet south of Broadway. 
Central street, 75 feet south of Broadway. 
Central street, 6 feet north of Forster street. 
Central street, 9 feet north of Vernon street. 
Central street, 200 feet south of Vernon street. 
Central street, 8 feet north of Albion street. 
Central street, corner of Summer. 
Chandler street, 16 feet south of Broadway. 
Chandler street, 216 feet north of Park avenue. 
Chauncey avenue, 9 feet north of Jaques street- 
Chester street, 15 feet north of Chester place. 
Chestnut street, 538 feet south of Poplar street. 
(Chestnut street, 246 feet south of Poplar street. 
Church street, 9 feet south of Summer street. 
Church street, 327 feet south of Summer street. 
Church street, 16 feet south of Somerville avenue. 
City stables, east end of yard. 
Clark street, 200 feet west of Newton street. 
Clyde street, south corner of Murdock street. 
Campbell park, 255 feet west of Meacham street. 
Charles street, 183 feet south of Washington street. 
Columbus avenue, 150 feet east of Bonner avenue. 
Columbus avenue, 123 feet west of Bonner avenue. 
Columbus avenue, 35 feet west of Stone avenue. 
Columbus avenue, 8 feet east of Walnut street. 
Concord avenue, 90 feet east of Concord square. 
Concord avenue, 30 feet east of Springfield street. 
Concord avenue, 20 feet east of Wyatt street. 
Conwell avenue, 465 feet west of Curtis street. 
Craigie street, 655 feet south of Summer street. 
Craigie street, 400 feet north of Somerville avenue. 
Crescent street, opposite Hadley street. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 257 



HYDRANT LOCATION. 

Cross street, corner of Otis street. 

Cross street, corner of Pearl street. 

Cross street, 16 feet north of Gilman street. 

Curtis street, 146 feet north of Professors' row. 

Curtis street, opposite Raymond avenue. 

Curtis street, 100 feet north of Fairmount avenue. 

Cutter street, 309 feet west of Webster street. 

Cutter street, 290 feet south of Broadway (south line). 

Dane street, 9 feet north of Tyler street. 

Dane street, 112 feet south of Skehan street. 

Dane street, 55 feet north of Skehan street. 

Dane street, 172 feet north of Washington street. 

Dane court, 510 feet east of Dane street. 

Dartmouth street, 312 feet south of Broadway. 

Dartmouth street, 57 feet south of Evergreen avenue. 

Dartmouth street, 180 feet north of Medford street. 

Day street, 30 feet south of Herbert street. 

Day street, corner of Orchard street. 

Dell street, 275 feet west of Glen street. 

Delaware street, 270 feet east of Aldrich street. 

Derby street, 399 feet east of Temple street. 

Dickinson street, 12 feet east of Beacon street. 

Dover street, 326 feet south of Davis square. 

Dover street, 71 feet north of Orchard street. 

Durham street, 54 feet south of Hanson street. 

Elm street, corner of Broadway. 

Elm street, opposite Jacob street. 

Elm street, 69 feet south of William street. 

Elm street, 6 feet south of Morrison street. 

Elm street, 10 feet north of Winter street. 

Elm street, 86 feet west of Chester street. 

Elm street, 18 feet west of Grove street. 

Elm street, 90 feet east of Tenney street. 

Elm street, 58 feet east of Willow avenue. 



258 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



HYDRANT LOCATION. 



Elm street, 6 feet west of Cherry street. 
Elm street, 9 feet west of Cedar avenue. 
Elm street, corner of Linden avenue. 
Elm street, 275 feet west of Craigie street. 
Elm street, 25 feet west of Russell street. 
Elmwood street, 450 feet south of Holland street. 
Eliot street, corner of Park street. 
Endicott avenue, 430 feet south of Broadway. 
Evergreen avenue, 8 feet east of School street. 
Everett avenue, 200 feet east of Dana street. 
Everett street, opposite Emerson street. 
Fairmount avenue, 590 feet west of Curtis street. 
Farragut avenue, 258 feet south of Broadway. 
Farragut avenue, 550 feet south of Broadway. 
Fiske avenue, 126 feet east of Hinckley street. 
Fitchburg street, 400 feet east of Linwood street. 
Florence street, 222 feet south of Perkins street. 
Florence street, 486 feet north of Washington street. 
Forster street, opposite Tennyson street. 
Francesca avenue, 305 feet east of Elm street. 
Franklin street, 14 feet north of Arlington street. 
Franklin street, 80 feet south of Webster street. 
Franklin street, 165 feet south of Pearl street. 
Franklin street, 87 feet south of Oliver street. 
Franklin street, 96 feet south of Palmer avenue. 
Franklin street, 29 feet north of Washington street. 
Fresh Pond Ice Company, in yard. 
Fremont street, 86 feet north of Main street. 
Fremont street, 350 feet north of Main street. 
Fountain avenue, 280 feet west of Glen street. 
Garden court, 475 feet south of Somerville avenue. 
Gibbens street, 206 feet west of Central street. 
Gibbens street, 129 feet west of Benton avenue. 
Gilman street, 240 feet east of Walnut street. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



HYDRANT LOCATION. 

Gilman street, 180 feet east of Aldrich street. 
Glen street, 9 feet north of Brooks street. 
Glen street, corner of Flint street. 
Gorham street, corner of Howard street. 
Grand View avenue, 288 feet east of Vinal avenue. 
Green street, 200 feet south of Summer street. 
Greenville street, 148 feet north of Boston street. 
Greenville street, 33 feet north of High street. 
Hamlet street, 321 feet south of Highland avenue. 
Hammond street, 30 feet west of Dickinson street. 
Hanson street, 40 feet north of Skehan street. 
Harvard street, 15 feet north of Beech street. 
Hawkins street, 50 feet east of Lake street. 
Heath street, 51 feet west of Temple street. 
Heath street, 320 feet west of West street. 
Heath street, corner of Bond street. 
Heath street, corner of Moreland street. 
Hawthorne street, 340 feet west of Willow avenue. 
Henderson street, 159 feet north of Wilton avenue. 
Herbert street, 192 feet east of Day street. 
High street, 300 feet west of Boston street. 
Highland avenue, corner of Medford street. 
Highland avenue, corner of Walnut street. 
Highland avenue, 72 feet west of Vinal avenue. 
Highland avenue, 278 feet west of Walnut street. 
Highland avenue, opposite Prescott street. 
Highland avenue, 318 feet west of School street. 
Highland avenue, 114 feet east of Sycamore street."' 
Highland avenue, corner of Central street. 
Highland avenue, 28 feet west of Belmont street. 
Highland avenue, 180 feet west of Lowell street. 
Highland avenue, corner of Porter street. 
Highland avenue, corner of Eastman place. 
Highland avenue, 36 feet east of Fanning avenue. 



259 



260 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



HYDRANT LOCATION. 



Highland avenue, corner of Willow avenue. 
Highland avenue, 6 feet west of Grove street. 
Highland avenue, 60 feet east of Davis square. 
Holland street, 42 feet west of Dover street. 
Holland street, 36 feet east of Winter street. 
Holland street, 105 feet west of Irving street. 
Holland street, 77 feet east of Elmwood street. 
Holland street, 117 feet west of Cameron avenue. 
Holland street, 80 feet east of Newbury street. 
Homer square, west side of square. 
Houghton street, 200 feet east of Springfield street. 
Hudson street, 292 feet east of Lowell street. 
Hudson street, 8 feet east of Porter street. 
Irving street, 6 feet south of Broadway. 
Irving street, 300 feet south of Broadway. 
Irving street, 420 feet north of Holland street. 
James street, 100 feet north of Pearl street. 
Jaques street, 9 feet north of Grant street. 
Jaques street, 362 feet east of Temple street. 
Jaques street, 190 feet west of Temple street. 
Jaques street, 300 feet east of Bond street. 
Jay street, 90 feet north of Howard street. 
Joy street, 36 feet south of Washington street. 
Joy street, 440 feet south of Washington street. 
Joy street, 285 feet north of Poplar street. 
Jenny Lind avenue, 16 feet north of Vernon street. 
Jenny Lind avenue, 467 feet north of Vernon street. 
Jenny Lind avenue, corner of Vernon street. 
Kent court, 285 feet west of Kent street. 
Kingman court, 300 feet south of Washington street. 
Kingston street, 402 feet west of Meacham street. 
Knowlton street, opposite Morton street. 
Lake street, 205 feet west of Hawkins street. 
Lake street, corner of Carleton street. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 261 



HYDEANT LOCATION. 

Laurel street, 300 feet south of Summer street. 
Laurel street, 8 feet north of Park place. 
Lawrence street, 9 feet south of Richardson street. 
Lincoln street, opposite Arlington street. 
Lincoln avenue, 224 feet west of Mt. Vernon street. 
Linden street, 33 feet north of Charlestown street. 
Linden street, 557 feet south of Somerville avenue. 
Linden avenue, 515 feet north of Elm street. 
Line street, 500 feet west of Cooney street. 
Linwood street, 416 feet south of Washington street. 
Linwood street, 225 feet north of Poplar street. 
Linwood street, 55 feet south of London street. 
Linwood street, corner of Linwood place. 
London street, 400 feet east of Linwood street. 
Loring street, 288 feet north of Somerville avenue. 
Lowell street, corner of Fiske avenue. 
Lowell street, 195 feet south of Richardson street. 
Lowell street, opposite Vernon street. 
Lowell street, 665 feet south of Summer street. 
Madison street, 480 feet west of School street. 
Main street, 116 feet west of Mt. Vernon avenue. 
Main street, corner of Moreland street. 
Maple street, 220 feet east of Medford street. 
Maple street, 9 feet north of Poplar street. 
Marshall street, corner of Evergreen avenue. 
Marshall street, opposite Howe street. 
Marshall street, 200 feet south of Broadway. 
Malloy court, 16 feet south of Somerville avenue. 
Medford street, junction of Broadway. 
Medford street, 16 feet from corner of Central street. 
Medford street, 16 feet east of Sycamore street. 
Medford street, 46 feet east of Thurston street. 
Medford street, corner of School street. 
Medford street, junction of Pearl street. 



262 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



HYDRANT LOCATION. 



Medford street, 8 feet east of Greenville street. 

Medford street, 13 feet west of Prospect Hill avenue. 

Medford street, 34 feet south of Central square. 

Medford street, opposite Chester avenue. 

Medford street, 236 feet south of Washington street. 

Medford street, 78 feet north of Maple street. 

Medford street, 21 feet north of Somerville avenue. 

Medford street, 98 feet north of Fitchburg R. R. 

Medford street, 70 feet south of Fitchburg R. R. 

Medford street, 30 feet north of Ward street. 

Medford street, 91 feet south of Ward street. 

Medford street, 93 feet north of Warren street. 

Medford street, 17 feet south of Warren street. 

Medford street, 80 feet southeast of Grand Junction R. R. 

Merriam street, 42 feet north of Charlestown street. 

Melrose street, 600 feet north of Mystic avenue. 

Mondamin court, junction of Harrison street. 

Montrose street, 417 feet west of School street. * 

Moore street, 21 feet north of Mead street. 

Morrison street, 13 feet west of Newbern street. 

Morrison street, 195 feet west of Clifton street. 

Morrison street, 33 feet west of Grove street. 

Miner street, 142 feet north of Vernon street. 

Murdock street, 200 feet east of Cedar street. 

Mt. Vernon street, 9 feet north of Pearl street. 

Mt. Vernon street, corner of Broadway^ 

Mt. Pleasant street, 276 feet south of Broadway. 

Myrtle street, 418 feet north of Washington street. 

Myrtle street, 82 feet south of Pearl street. 

Mystic avenue, corner of Union street. 

Mystic avenue, near Medford line. 

Nashua street, 215 feet south of Wilton street. 

Newbury street, 570 feet south of Holland street. 

Newbury street, 965 feet south of Holland street. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 263 



HYDRANT LOCATION. 

North street, 440 feet north of Raymond avenue. 
North street, 190 feet north of City Bound No. 19. 
North Union street, 300 feet north of Mystic avenue. 
Oak street, 390 feet west of Prospect street. 
Oakland avenue, 230 feet west of Marshall street. 
Oliver street, 15 feet east of Glen street. 
Orchard street, 9 feet west of Russell street. 
Orchard street, 9 feet east of Chester street. 
Orchard street, corner of Blake street. 
Otis street, 9 feet east of Dana street. 
Oxford street, 358 feet west of School street. 
Oxford street, 100 feet west of Hersey street. 
Park avenue, 90 feet west of Elm street. 
Park street, 69 feet north of Fitchburg R. R. 
Park street, 155 feet north of Beacon street. 
Partridge avenue, 26 feet north of Medford street. 
Partridge avenue, 126 feet south of Medford street. 
Partridge avenue, 450 feet south of Medford street. 
Partridge avenue, 290 feet north of Vernon street. 
Pearl street, corner of Pinckney street. 
Pearl street, 69 feet west of Hillside avenue. 
Pearl street, 18 feet east of Delaware street. 
Pearl street, 9 feet west of Glen street. 
Pearl street, 30 feet west of Dana street. 
Pearl street, corner of Wigglesworth street. 
Pearl street, corner of Walnut street. 
Pearl street, 120 feet east of Marshall street. 
Perkins street, opposite Myrtle street. 
Perkins street, opposite Lincoln street. 
Perkins street, 63 feet east of Perkins place., 
Perkins street, 21 feet east of Mt. Pleasant street. 
Pinckney street, 345 feet south of Pearl street. 
Pleasant avenue, 290 feet east of Vinal avenue. 
Prescott street, 326 feet south of Highland avenue. 



264 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



HYDRANT LOCATION. 



Prescott street, 582 feet south of Highland avenue^ 
Prescott street, 257 feet north of Summer street. 
Preston street, 375 feet west of School street. 
Poplar street, 21 feet west of Joy street. 
Porter street, corner of Mountain avenue. ' 
Porter street, 24 feet north of Williams' court. 
Professors' row, 140 feet west of College avenue. 
Professors' row, 300 feet west of College avenue. 
Professors' row, 580 feet west of College avenue. 
Professors' row, 188 feet east of Packard avenue. 
Professors' row, 305 feet west of Packard avenue. 
Prospect Hill avenue, 9 feet north of High street. 
Prospect street, 135 feet north of Bennett street. 
Prospect street, corner of Webster avenue. 
Prospect street, 210 feet south of Oak street. 
Putnam street, 116 feet south of Highland avenue. 
Putnam street, 608 feet north of Summer street. 
Putnam street, 308 feet north of Summer street. 
Quincy street, 315 feet south of Summer street. 
Quincy street, corner of Somerville avenue. 
Richardson street, 12 feet west of Henderson street. 
Richdale avenue, opposite Thurston street. 
Robinson street, 333 feet west of Central street. 
Rogers' avenue, 300 feet north of Morrison avenue. 
Rossmore street, 260 feet south of Washington street. 
Runey street, 18 feet west of Flint avenue. 
Sanborn avenue, 60 feet east of Walnut street. 
Sargent avenue, 36 feet north of Mills street. 
School street, 108 feet south of Maple avenue. 
School street, 8 feet south of Montrose street. 
School street, 88 feet north of Oxford street. 
School street, 88 feet nortii of Avon street. 
School street, 100 feet south of Summer street. 
School street. 93 feet south of Preston street. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



265 



HYDRANT LOCATION. 



School street, 61 feet north of Knapp street. 
Sewall street, 324 feet west of Grant street. 
Somerville avenue, 181 feet west of Mossland street. 

, 195 feet east of Beacon-street bridge. 

, 500 feet east of Beacon-street bridge. 

, 120 feet west of Elm street. 

, 40 feet west of Lowell street. 

, corner of Spring street. 

, opposite Spring street. 

, 15 feet west of Beech street. 

, 9 feet east of Central street. 

, 15 feet west of Laurel street. 

, 100 feet west of Loring street. 

, 113 feet east of Dane street. 

, 185 feet west of Hawkins street. 

, 88 feet west of Quincy street. 

, 105 feet east of Carleton street. 

, 400 feet west of Prospect street. 

, 83 feet west of Prospect street. 

, 30 feet west of Linden street. 

, 12 feet east of Mystic street. 

, 121 feet south of Medford street. 

, 86 feet south of Poplar street. 

, 490 feet north of Fitchburg E. R. 

, 100 feet north of Fitchburg R. R. 

, south side of Fitchburg R. R. 

, 260 feet north of Franklin court. 

, corner of Franklin court. 

, 100 feet north of Cambridge line. 
Summer street, 160 feet east of Cutter avenue. 
Summer street, 6 feet east of Cherry street. 
Summer street, 6 feet east of Cedar street. 
Summer street, corner of Porter street. 
Summer street, corner of Lowell street. 



Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 



266 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



HYDRANT LOCATION. 



Summer street, corner of Spring street. 

Summer street, corner of Harvard street. 

Summer street, 54 feet east of Preston street. 

Summer street, 200 feet west of School street. 

Summer street, 8 feet east of School street. 

Summer street, opposite Putnam street (east line). 

Summer street, 6 feet west of Vinal avenue (west line)- 

South street, 234 feet west of Medford street. 

South street, corner of Emery street. 

South street, corner of Earle street. 

Springfield street, 140 feet south of Concord avenue. 

Springfield street, 21 feet south of Dickinson street. 

Springfield street, 120 feet north of Cambridge line. 

Summit avenue, 120 feet west of Walnut street. 

Sunnyside avenue, 105 feet west of Wigglesworth street. 

Sycamore street, 18 feet south of Broadway. 

Sycamore street, 360 feet south of Broadway. 

Sycamore street, corner of Forster street. 

Sycamore street, 213 feet north of Medford street. 

Stickney avenue, 212 feet west of Marshall street. 

Sydney street, 412 feet east of Temple street. 

Temple street, 53 feet north of Jaques street. 

Tenney court, 318 feet north of Mystic avenue. 

Thurston street, 6 feet north of Evergreen avenue. 

Trull street, 264 feet north of Vernon street. 

Tufts street, 75 feet north of Washington street. 

Tufts street, 48 feet west of Glen street. 

Tufts street, 54 feet east of Cross street. 

Thorndike street, 10 feet south of Boston & Lowell R. R. 

Thorpe place, 280 feet south of Highland avenue. 

Union square, corner of Washington street. 

Union square, west side of square. 

Vernon street, 75 feet west of Partridge avenue. 

Vinal avenue, 12 feet south of Grand View avenue. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 267 



HYDRANT LOCATION. 

Vinal avenue, 129 feet north of Aldersey street. 
Vinal avenue, 219 feet north of Summer street. 
Vine street, 9 f^et south of Tyler street. 
Vine street, 180 feet north of Beacon street. 
Virginia street, 45 feet west of Aldrich street. 
Wallace street, 40 feet south of Broadway. 
Wallace street, 480 feet south of Broadway. 
Wallace street, 175 feet north of Park avenue. 
Walnut street, 38 feet south of Veazie street. 
Walnut street, 92 feet south of Wellington avenue. 
Walnut street, 36 feet north of Pleasant avenue. 
Walnut street, 12 feet south of Boston street. 
Ward street, 84 feet west of Medford street. 
Ward street, corner of Emery street. 
Ward street, corner of Harris street. 
Ware street, 258 feet west of Curtis street. 
Warren avenue, 75 feet south of Columbus avenue. 
Warren avenue, 175 feet north of Bow street. 
Warwick street, 420 feet east of Cedar street. 
Washington street, 45 feet east of Beacon street. 
Washington street, 186 feet west of Dane street. 
Washington street, 9 feet east of Leland street. 
Washington street, 96 feet south of Parker street. 
Washington street, 6 feet east of Kingman court. 
Washington street, corner of Mystic street. 
Washington street, 84 feet east of Boston street. 
Washington street, 50 feet east of Shawmut street. 
Washington street, 15 feet west of Myrtle street. 
Washington street, 20 feet east of Franklin avenue. 
Washington street, corner of Myrtle street. 
Washington street, corner of Florence street. 
Washington street, corner of Mt. Vernon street. 
Washington street, 69 feet west of Crescent street. 
Washington street, opposite Union square. 



268 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



HYDRANT LOCATION. 

Webster avenue, 96 feet south of Union square. 
Webster avenue, 12 feet south of Everett street. 
Webster avenue, 25 feet north of Newton street. 
Webster avenue, 63 feet north of Prospect street. 
Webster avenue, 275 feet south of Prospect street. 
Webster street, 12 feet east of Rush street. 
Webster street, 12 feet west of Cutter street. 
Wellington avenue, west of Montgomery avenue. 
Wheatland street, 135 feet north of Broadway. 
Wheatland street, 9 feet south of Jaques street. 
Wheatland street, 100 feet south of Mystic avenue. 
Wigglesworth street, corner of Otis street. 
Willow avenue, 12 feet north of Summer street. 
Willow avenue, 250 feet north of Highland avenue. 
Willow avenue, 66 feet south of Morrison street. 
West street, corner of Highland avenue. 
Wilton street, 6 feet east of Nashua street. 
Wilton street, 12 feet east of Lawrence street. 
Winslow avenue, 66 feet east of Villa avenue. 
Wyatt street, 42 feet west of Cook street. 
Winter Hill Circle, 200 feet north of Broadway. 
West street, 144 feet north of Highland avenue. 



PRIVATE HYDRANTS 



John p. Squire 
North Packing Co. . 
McLean Asylum 
Middlesex Bleachery 
American Tube Works 
Union Glass Works 
Fitchburg R. R. 



7 
2 
4 
3 
2 
1 
1 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



269 



FIRE SERVICES. 

For the protection of the New England Dressed Meat & Wool 
Co., John P. Squire & Co., Somerville Electric Light Co., Wilbur P. 
Rice's planing mill, the following fire services were laid, the ex- 
pense of which was paid by the above firms : — 



New England Dressed Meat & Wool Co. : — 




745 feet of . 


10-inch pipe 


11 " " . 


8 *' 


18 " " 


6 " 


42 " " 


4 " " 


62 " " 


2 " " 



This ten-inch pipe is connected with the dead end on Merriam 
street, and through their premises and connects with the f ourteen-inch 
pipe on Medford street. Attached to this pipe are three (fire) 
hydrants. 



John P. Squire & Co.: — 

24 feet of . 

60 " " ... 



10-inch pipe 
6 " " 



Somerville Electric Light Co. 
153 feet of .... 

Wilbur P. Rice's planing mill 

32 feet of .... 

61 " " . . 



4-inch pipe 



6-inch pipe 



SERVICES. 



• Whole number of services laid for families and other purposes 
during the year, 529. 

Total length of pipe used, four miles, 1,172 feet. 

There were fourteen relaid, which were filled up with rust and 
other causes. 



270 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

There were seventy-four cleared of rust, fish, and sediments. 

There were 108 iron boxes set, in place of old decayed wooden 
ones. 

There were thirty-one leaks on services, of which the following 
were causes : Sixteen by broken leads, eight by settling of earth, 
four by pick holes, three by loose couplings. 

On account of relaying, 512 services were connected with new 
mains, of which the following stock was used: Eleven 1-inch 
corporations, six ^-inch corporations, 495 ^-inch corporations, 289 
lead connections, 1,536 feet of pipe. 

Total length of service pipes in the city, forty-nine miles, 3,868 
feet. 

There were lined at shops six miles, 918 feet of one-inch pipe. 

There were made 1,141 lead connections. 



STAND-PIPES. 

Two new ones were set the past year, making the total number 
now in use thirty-three, located as follows : — 

One on Beacon street, opposite Cooney street. 

One on Broadway, near corner of Franklin street. 

One on Broadway, opposite Park street. 

One on Broadway, corner of Clarendon avenue. 

One on Concord avenue, corner of Marion street. 

One on Elm street, near Morrison street. 

One on Highland avenue, corner of Medford street. 

One on Highland avenue, corner of Central street. 

One on Linwood street, near Poplar street. 

One on Main street, near Broadway. i 

One on Medford street, corner of Lee street. 

One on Medford street, near Magoun square. 

One on Mystic avenue, corner of Union street. 

One on Pearl street, corner of Walnut street. 

One on Pearl street, near Delaware street. 

One on Pinckney street, corner of Pearl street. 

One on Putnam street, corner of Summer street. 

One on Somerville avenue, near Cambridge line. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 271 

One on Somerville avenue, near Poplar street. 
One on Somerville avenue, corner of Mystic street. 
One on Somerville avenue, near School street. 
One on Somerville avenue, corner of Beacon street. 
One on Spring street, near Somerville avenue. 
One on Summer street, opposite Laurel street. 
One on Summer street, corner of Elm street. 
One on Tufts street, corner of Cross street. 
One on Vinal avenue, near Highland avenue. 
One on Washington street, corner of Myrtle street. 
One on Washington street, corner of Boston street. 
One on Washington street, near Union square. 
One on Washington street, opposite Leland street. 
One on Summer street, corner of Cedar street. 
One on Putnam street, corner of Summer street. 

DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 

There were set during the past year two new ones, making a total 
now in the city of seven, which are located as follows : — 

One on Broadway, opposite the Public Park. 

One on Davis square, corner of Highland avenue and Elm street. 

One on Davis square, opposite Dover street. 

One on Highland avenue at engine house, corner Walnut street. 

One on Magoun square (north side ). 

One at junction of Somerville avenue and Bow street. 
. One at junction of Somerville avenue and Washington street. 

The fountains have had the usual repairs, and have had new 
chains, dippers, faucets, and stop-cocks, and they are in good condi- 
tion. 

HIGH SERVICE. 

There has been no extension of this service made during the 
year, and it is working perfectly and no complaint of lack of water 
within the territory that it covers has been made. 

The tank was thoroughly cleaned in July last. Not very much 
sediment was found on the bottom, and none on the sides. 



272 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



The tank was painted on the inside with one coat of the best 
asphalt paint. Some small leaks begin to show on the outside of the 
tank and will need to be recaulked the coming season. 

STOCK AND TOOLS ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1893. 



STOCK. 



Cast-iron pipe 
Special castings . 
Gates and hydrants 
Service-pipe materials 
Sundry materials . 



$860 00 

2,656 77 

784 00 

802 17 

425 00 



$5,527 94 



TOOLS AND FURNITURE. 



Special patterns . . . . . 

Tools and machinery . . 

Stable department . . 

Office furniture . . . . . 

Pumping station furniture and tools 


$1,550 00 

1,212 52 

1,099 00 

600 00 

225 00 


$4,686 52 




. 


Total 


$10,214 46 



The superintendent, in closing, takes this opportunity to thank 
the members of the Water Board for their support and co-operation 
in the works of the department. 

NATHANIEL DENNETT, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



273 



ENGINEER OF PUMPING STATION'S REPORT. 



High-service Pumping Station. 
SoMERviLLE, Dcc. 31, 1892. 



} 



To the Somerville Mystic Water Board:- 



Gentlemen, — Below is a statement of the work performed by 
the high-service pump during the year ending December 31, 1892 : — 



Number of days on which the pump was run 

Total pumping time in hours 

Average pumping time per day in hours 

Average number of strokes per minute 

Number of tons of coal consumed 

Total number of gallons of water pumped 

Average steam pressure 

Average back-water pressure 



366 

1,647 

4.30 

9fi 7 9 

207 

127,082,640 

52 lbs. 

37 lbs. 



The following is a list of all the supplies, tools, furniture, etc., 
at the High-service Pumping Station December 31, 1892: — 



Cylinder oil, 6 gallons. 
Lard oil, 5 gallons. 
230 paper ferrules. 



Machine oil, 8 gallons. 
Waste, 100 lbs. 



TOOLS. 



1 bench vice. 
1 truck. 

1 service wrench. 
1 hand saw. 

1 chisel bar. 

2 floor brushes. 

2 copper oil cans, 10 gallons each. 
1 coal car. 



1 grindstone. 
1 gate wrench. 
1 ratchet wrench. 

1 hand axe. 

2 lanterns. 

2 step ladders. 

1 iron wheelbarrow. 



274 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



FIRE TOOLS. 



1 hoe. 1 fire shovel. 

1 slice bar. 2 fire hooks. 

All in good repair. 

FURNITURE. 

1 iron safe. 1 writing desk. 

1 writing table. 10 chairs. 

2 brooms. 1 floor brush. 
1 bench brush. 2 water pails. 

1 dust brush. 1 length of inch hose. 

The following supplies have been received during the year end- 
ing December 31, 1892 : — 

From Star Brass Mfg. Co., 12 water glasses. 

H. R. Worthington, 1 set of rubber valves for air pump. 

Water Office, 1 bench brush, 1 package of gold dust, 2 boxes 
of pomade, 2 cans of Britman's oil polish, 1 broom, 1 floor 
brush. 

H. R. Worthington, 1 steam chest cover for air pump, 

Boston Bolt Co., 15 bolts. 

W. F. Law, 10 gallons of cylinder oil, 24 inches of ring pack- 
ing for air and feed pumps. 

A. W. Russell, 1 tube brush. 

H. R. Worthington, 36 springs. 

Water Office, 1 box of pomade, 1 package of gold dust, 1 
can of Britman's oil polish. 

H. R. Worthington, 250 paper ferrules for condenser. 

Water Office, 6 towels, ^ yard of Canton flannel, 10 yards 
sheeting, 3 webs of fly netting. 

A. W. Russell, 1 bale of waste, 230 lbs. 

H. R. Worthington, 10 feet of ^ inch Tupper's packing for 
air pump. 

Water Office, 5 feet of ji rubber for cylinder head. 

W. F. Law, 10 gallons of cylinder oil, 10 gallons of njachine 
oil, 48 inches of Oarlock's ring packing for air and feed 
pumps, 1 piece of small packing for valve stems. 

R. T. Barr, 30 lbs. of sal-soda, 1 box of soda ash. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 275 

I wish to express my thanks to the members of the board for 
their confidence in me, and to the superintendent for many favors 
and hearty co-operation in the work of this department. 

Yours respectfully, 

SIDNEY E. HAYDEN, Engineer. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, February 8, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, February 15, 1893. 
Concurred in. 

.CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



BOARD OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Hon. William H. Hodgkins, Chairman^ ex officio. 

Nathan H. Reed Ward One. 

Edward B. West Ward Two. 

James G. Hinckley Ward Three. 

Charles G. Brett, President Ward Four. 



COMMITTEES; 



On Investigation and RelieJ . . Mr. Brett and Mr. West. 
On Finance .... Mr. Reed and Mr. Hinckley. 

Charles C. Folsom, General Agent. 

Frank W. Kaan, Secretary. 

Alvah B. Dearborn, M. D., City Physician. 

Office : Police Building, Bow Street. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



^So His Honor the Mayor and the City Council oj the City oj Somer- 
ville : — 

Gentlemen, — The Board of Overseers of the Poor herewith 
presents its annual report for the year ending December 31, 1892. 

The membership has remained unchanged, except in Ward 
Three, where Mr. Stillson had faithfully served for several years, but 
owing to failing health he refused a re-election, and Mr. James G. 
Hinckley was elected in his place in April. 

Mr. F. W. Kaan, who has been secretary of the board for five 
years, has resigned. This we consider a loss to the board, as he 
has been very efficient and accurate in his work. 

C. C. Folsom, general agent for the last eight years, still attends 
to his duties in a faithful and satisfactory manner. 

During the year a house that had been donated to the city by 
Ann McKone was destroyed by fire, and ^300 was received by this 
department for insurance. Later in the year we sold the land on 
which the house stood for $460. This also was credited to the sup- 
port of poor account. In October Nathaniel C. Woodman sent for 
the general agent and paid him $200 for the city, it being in part 
payment for aid rendered to him during the last twelve years. 

These amounts aggregate nearly $1,000, so that our appropria- 
tion for 1893 must be at least $1,000 more than it was for 1892, if we 
spend no more in this department; but owing to the increase in popu- 
lation, it is fair to assume that we shall be called upon to spend more 
money for the poor in the ensuing year than tor the year just closed. 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 281 

For the detailed statement of our work we will refer you to the 

following tables. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed) WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, Chairman, ex officio. 

NATHAN H. REED, Ward One. 
EDWARD B. WEST, Ward Two. 
JAMES G. HINCKLEY, Ward Three. 
CHARLES G. BRETT, President Ward Four. 



282 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. I. 

• PARTIAL SUPPORT ( OUT-DOOR RELIEF). 

Families aided 

Persons aided . . 

Burials . . . . . . . . 

Permits to the Tewksbury almshouse . . . 



184 

739 

17 

8 



TABLE No. 2. 

FULL SUPPORT DURING THE YEAR. 

In almshouses ....... 

" private families 

" Boston hospitals ...... 

" Massachusetts School for the Feeble-minded 

*' House of the Angel Guardian . . . 
Insane persons in private families 

" " " hospitals .... 



15 

17 

18 

4 

2 

5 

45 



TABLE No. 3. 
FULL SUPPORT AT PRESENT TIME, DECEMBER 31, 1892. 



In out-of-town almshouses . . . . 


. 11 


" private families 


. 10 


" children . '. 


5 


Insane in hospitals (we are reimbursed for 2) . 


. 34 


" " private families ..... 


5 


TABLE No. 4. 




RECAPITULATION. 




Appropriation 


. $14,000 00 


Reimbursements .....,, 


3,099 90 


Total receipts 


. $17,099 90 


Total expenditures 


17,015 30 


Balance . . . . ., . 


$84 60 


Net expenditures .... 


. 13,915 40 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



28S 



TABLE No. 5. 

REIMBURSEM ENTS. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
City of Boston 

" " Cambridge 
•" " Newburyport 

" " Gloucester 

*' " Woburn . 

" " Lowell 

" " New Bedford 

" " Waltham . 
Town of Lexington 

" '' Stoneham 

" " Sandwich 

" " Revere . 

" " Arlington 

" " Milford . 
Guardians and relatives 
Insurances on McKone house 
Land sold on South street 
N. C. Woodman . 



$958 98 


276 


54 


119 


80 


2 


00 


4 


85 


23 


75 


28 


00 


61 


73 


15 


00 


72 


00 


52 


32 


4 


00 


70 


75 


2 


00 


8 


95 


439 


23 


300 


00 


460 


00 


200 


00 



i3,099 90 



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REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, February 1, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports^ 

Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



Concurred in. 



In Common Council, February 1, 1893. 
CHA.RLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of the Board of Health, ) 
City Hall, January 25, 1893. j 

To the Honorable the Mayor and the City Council: — 

Gentlemen, — We respectfully submit the following as the 
fifteenth annual report of the Board of Health, in which is presented 
a statement, tabulated and otherwise, of the sanitary condition of the 
city and the business of the board for the year ending December 
31, 1892: — 

ORGANIZATION. 

Chairman^ J. Frank Wellington. 
Clerk, William P. Mitchell. 
Agent, Caleb A. Page. 

Charles H. Crane was reappointed a member of the board for 
two years. 

NUISANCES. 

A record of nuisances abated during the year, in compliance 
with notices issued by the board or under the board's direction, is 
presented in the following table, under the heads of the months when 
the complaints were made : — 



288 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



NUISANCES ABATED IN THE YEAR 1892. 



Cellar damp 

Cellar open 

Cesspool offensive 

Cesspool overflowing .... 

Connections of drainage pipes de 
fective _ . 

Connections or gas-pipes defective 

Cows allowed on streets and side 
walks _ . . . , 

Decomposed meat offensive . . 

Dogs kept in kitchen 

Drainage defective 

Drainage emptying into cellar . , 

Drainage emptying on surface . . 

Drainage not ventilated . . . . 

Drain-pipe defective 

Goats kept without a license . . . 

Hennery offensive 

Hens kept in cellar 

Manure exposed and offensive . . 

Manure-pit defective . . . . . 

Manure-pit too close to house . . 

Offal on land 

Offensive odor in and about dwel- 
lings 

Open cellar under stable . . . . 

Opening in drain-pipe in cellar . . 

Pigs kept without license . . . . 

Premises filthy 

Premises untidy 

Privy-vault defective 

Privy-vault full 

Privy-vault offensive 

Removal of bodies of animals 
burned at fires 

Rubbish in cellar 

Sewage flowing under floor . . . 

Sewer-gas in house 

Slops thrown on surface .... 

Stable infected with glanders . . 

Stable and stable premises filthy 
and offensive 

Stable without drainage .... 

Stagnant water in house cellar . . 

Stagnant water on surface .... 

Ventilation under steps offensive . 

Waste-pipe defective 

Waste-pipe not trapped .... 

Water-closet defective 

Water-closet insufficiently supplied 

with water 

Water-closet offensive ..... 
Water in cellar 

Total 



92 



22 



107 



37 



2 
1 

2 
1 
1 

4 
19 



4 
11 

22 
38 



79 



70 



63 



195 



134 



14 



23 
1 
6 
5 

18 
1 

3 

2 
1 

15 

17 

27 

11 

11 

2 

4 

5 

48 

2 

1 

13 

25 

4 

7 

8 

2 

30 

35 

139 

218 



4 
7 
1 
3 

6 

16 

3 

9 

4 

5 

27 

23 

17 

5 
2 



824 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 289 

Number of nuisances abated ....... 824 

referred to board of 1893 ... 381 

" " complained of .... . 1,205 

" complaints (many covering more than one nui- 
sance ) . . . . . . . . 584 

" tenements ordered vacated . . . . .5 

" notices mailed . . . . . . . 579 

" " served by constables .... 5 

Many nuisances have been abated on verbal notice from the 
agent, without any action of the board ; and of such no record has 
been made. 

Glanders. — As may be seen by the foregoing table [stables 
infected with glanders], several cases of glanders have occurred 
during the year. When this disease is encountered the promptest 
action is necessary, and that we may have opportunity to take such 
action, we ask that owners of horses notify the board or its agent 
immediately on the appearance of this disease. 

Sewer Outlet, Mystic Avenue. — As was stated in the report 
of this board for the year 1891, this outlet is in a very offensive state. 
The drainage of a large part of Winter Hill empties, on the north- 
easterly side of Mystic avenue, into an open ditch, which extends 
across the marshes to a culvert under Middlesex avenue, and thence 
to the Mystic river. At its lower end, it collects at times and causes 
a nuisance, which should be attended to at the very earliest possible 
convenience. 

Sewer at Clarendon Hill, West Somerville. — There is 
great need of sewerage in Jay, Elmwood, Cameron, and Gorham 
streets, West Somerville. At the lower end of these streets there are 
no sewers, and the abutters are obliged to drain on the surface, which 
necessarily creates a nuisance. In the opinion of this board, sewers 
should be constructed as soon as possible in this locality. 

SLAUGHTERING AND RENDERING ESTABLISHMENTS. 

During the past year the Board of Aldermen have granted a 
license for rendering to C. M. Hinckley, and a license to slaughter 
and render to the New England Dressed Meat & Wool Company. 
There are now located within the limits of the city three of the larg- 



290 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

est slaughtering establishments in the country. To reduce to the 
minimum the disagreeable features inherent to business of this nature, 
it is necessary that the closest supervision should be had of them all, 
and to this end we would suggest that this board be given authority 
to employ a suitable person, who should devote all his time to the 
inspection of these and kindred works, believing that the results to 
be obtained will be beneficial to the city. 

CLEANLINESS OF THE CITY. 

In September last, fully realizing the importance of extra vigilance 
on account of the threatened cholera epidemic, the board gave un- 
usual attention to the cleanliness and sanitary condition of the city. 
Extra inspectors were employed, two of the sergeants and seven 
patrolmen of the police force were appointed emergency officers of 
the board, and to further assist us in our work an appeal was issued 
to the citizens for co-operation, and the results accomplished were 
so highly satisfactory that we believe the city was never in a better 
sanitary condition than at present. 

FILLING FROM SOMERVILLE AVENUE. 

During the past year South, Columbia, Harrison, Hanson, 
Clark, Durham, Skehan, Granite, and Bennett streets, and Carey and 
Conlon courts have been graded and filled with the macadam filling 
taken from Somerville avenue. 

PERMITS. 

The record of permits to keep cows, swine, and goats, to collect 
grease, and for the removal of manure, is as follows : — 

Cows. — Thirteen applications were received for permits to keep 
lifty-two cows. No fee is charged for these permits. 

Swine. — Twenty-nine applications were received for permits to 
keep 201 swine. Twenty-seven permits were granted to keep 196 
swine, and the two remaining applications for permits for five swine 
were refused. The fee is $1 for each swine. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



291 



Goats. — Eleven applications were received for permits to keep 
twelve goats, all of which were granted. Fee for each goat, $1. 

Grease. — Three applications were received for permits to 
collect grease, which were granted. The fee is $2. Two of those 
licensed reside in Somerville, and one in Charlestown. 

Manure. — Two permits were issued during the year for the 
carting of manure through the city in the day-time between May 1 
and November 1, and eight were issued for the removal of manure 
from stables in the city in the day-time within the same period. 
No fee is charged for these permits. 

PEDLERS. 

One hundred and two certificates were issued to hawkers and 
pedlers under the ordinance numbered thirty of the Revised Ordi- 
nances of 1891. 

These certificates are not required to be renewed, but are good 
for an indefinite time, and a large number of those who have obtained 
them have ceased to carry on the business. 

All pedlers are required to present their vehicles for inspection 
by the agent of the board at the police building monthly, so that the 
agent may see that the vehicle is kept clean and is properly marked 
with the owner's name and number. 

ASHES. 



Ashes and house-dirt were removed during the first half of the 
year by John F. Elkins, at the contract price of $4,250 per annum. 

On June 15 the following proposals were received to collect the 
ashes and house-dirt for the year commencing July 1, 1892 : — 



Owen Cunningham & Son 
T. F. Crimmings . 
Martin Gill . 
John F. Elkins . 
Henry Gray 
Jeremiah McCarthy 



)8,500 00 
6,200 00 
6,150 00 
5,865 00 
5,000 00 
4,500 00 



And the contract was awarded to Jeremiah McCarthy for $4,500.00. 



292 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The collections are made weekly in each of the six districts : — 

Monday in District 1. 
Tuesday in District 2. 
Wednesday in District 3. 
Thursday in District 4. 
Friday in District 5. 
Saturday in District 6. 

Materials for removal must be free from filth and offal, must be 
placed in barrels or boxes, and must be set on the outer edge of the 
sidewalk before 8 o'clock in the morning of the day when the collec- 
tion is to be made. 

HOUSE OFFAL. 

In March proposals were issued upon the same terms as in years 
past, requiring the contractor to furnish all wagons, sleds, etc., used 
in the performance of the work, and but one bid was received, from 
Henry Gray, for $7,400. This was rejected, and in the latter part of 
the same month second proposals were issued, with the modification, 
however, that the city would furuish all wagons, sleds, etc., and in 
response the following bids were received to remove house offal for 
two years, from June 26 : — 

Jeremiah McCarthy . . $7,500 00 per year. 

Henry Gray .... 7,400 00 

John F. Elkins . . . 6,900 00 

Martin Gill .... 6,850 00 

And the contract was awarded to Martin Gill. 

The board then purchased of Henry Gray five second-hand 
wagons and three sleds for $550, and one wagon of Christopher 
Burke for $65. One new wagon has been ordered of A. S. Symmes, 
of Medford, which is to be delivered early next season. 

The new contractor finding it impossible to obtain a suitable 
place for dumping the offal, the Board of Health finally leased for a 
term of two years a lot of land on Melrose street, belonging to H. S. 
Pond, and sub-let the same to Martin Gill, the contractor. 

The work of this department for the past year has not been done 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 293 

to the satisfaction of the board, some of it occasioned, no doubt, by 
the change of contractor, and his unfamiliarity with the work. 

The board is of the opinion that it will be for the best interests 
of the city to assume, as soon as possible, the entire charge of the 
collection and disposal of house offal. 

The amount of offal collected during the year 1892 was about 
674 cords. 

NIGHT SOIL. 

The removal of night soil has been made by R. M. Johnson, of 
Arlington, and has been carried on by the " Odorless" process. 

The contract price, which the owner or occupant is charged, is 
four dollars for every load, or part of a load, of eighty cubic feet. 

About 507 loads have been removed during the past year. 

An order book is kept at the Police Station on Bow street. 

DEATHS. 

There were 718 deaths and forty-seven still-births in the city 
during the year, as specified in the following table : — 



294 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



MORTALITY IN SOMERVILLE IN 1892. 



ft 



s 

M 

S 
< 



ZYMOTIC DISEASES. 

Miasmatic. 

Scarlet fever 

Diphtheria 

Typhoid fever 

Erysipelas ....... 

Diarrhoea 

Cholera infantum .... 

Septicsemia 

Whooping cough ..... 

Dysentery 

Rheumatism 

CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 

Diathetic. 

Cancer 

Tumor ........ 

Tubercular. 
Tuberculosis 

LOCAL DISEASES. 

Nervous System. 

Apoplexy 

Paralysis 

Insanity 

Brain disease 

Meningitis 

Convulsions 

Spinal disease 

Hemiplegia ...... 

Organs of Circulation. 

Heart disease 

Aneurism , 

Angina pectoris 

Cyanosis , 

Phlebetis , 

Respiratory Organs. 

Pneumonia 

Bronchitis 

Hemorrhage 

Phthisis pulmonalis 

Pleurisy 

Asthma , 

Influenza 

Laryngitis , 

Congestion of lungs 

Digestive Organs. 

Gastritis 

Peritonitis 

Liver disease 

Gastric ulcer 

Enteritis 

Intestinal catarrh 

Jaundice 

Cholera Morbus 



5 11 



1 

13 



14 

8 

11 

a 
a 

37 

2 
6 
1 

2 



20 
3 



18 
19 
10 
10 
31 
12 
3 
2, 



76 
1 
I 

1 
I 



67 
31 
17 

iia 
1 

2 

12 

3 

1 



1 

12 
7 
1 
9 
3 
1 
2 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



295 



MORTALITY IN SOMERVILLE IN im% — Continued. 





>, 






















J3 








1 




< 


^ 

^ 




"p 
•— > 


C/3 

1 


1) 


0) 

% 

o 


I 


a 


"(3 
o 

H 


Genito-Urinary Organs. 




























Bright's disease 


2 


1 


2 


- 


1 


- 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


- 


14 


Diabetes 


1 


- 


: 


~ 


1 


— 


: 


- 


— 


1 


2 


— 


3 


Cystitis 


2 


Nephritis 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5 


Uraemia 




- 




- 




- 






_ 


- 


_ 


1 


1 


Childbirth 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Metritis 














1 












1 


DEVELOPMENTAL DISEASES. 




Of Children. 




























Inanition 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


Premature birth and congenital 




debility 


3 


2 


2 


3 


4 


1 


2 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 


27 


Of Old People. 




























Old age 


12 


1 


5 


3 


3 


- 


3 
1 


1 
1 


3 


1 


2 

1 


1 

1 


35 


General debility 


4 


•Gangrene 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


VIOLENT DEATHS. 




























Railroad 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


5 


Suicide, hanging 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


Asphyxia 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


1 


- 


3 


Sunstroke 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


Accidental drowning 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Fall on stairs 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


— 


1 




_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


1 


Fracture of skull, accident . ... 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


Concussion of brain 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


2 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


UNCLASSIFIED. 




























Abscess 


1 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 






_ 






1 


Anemia ....... 


1 


. 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


_ 


_ 


5 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 




- 


- 


- 


1 


Chlorosis 


- 


- 


: 


: 


: 


- 


- 


1 

1 


— 


1 


~ 


- 


1 


Exhaustion 


2 


Total 


118 


58 


55 


51 


54 


56 


64 


58 


54 


56 


47 


47 


718 


Stillborn 


3 


6 


3 


6 


3 


3 


3 


4 


2 


3 


4 


7 


47 






Population (estimated) . . 






















46, 


037 




Death rate per thousand . . 






















1 


5.6 





296 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



DISEASES DANGEROUS TO THE PUBLIC HEALTH. 

This board has adjudged small-pox, scarlet fever, diphtheria, and 
typhus fever to be contagious and dangerous to the public health, 
within the meaning of the statute. Our city has been free from 
small-pox and from typhus fever for several years past. Physicians 
are required to report immediately to the board every case of either 
of these diseases coming under their care, and postal cards, con- 
veniently printed and addressed, are supplied to them for the purpose. 

Scarlet Fever. — 371 cases of scarlet fever, generally of a mild 
type, were reported to us during the year, 14 of which resulted fatally . 
This is an increase over 1891, when there were 127 cases and 2 
deaths. 

We place a warning card at the entrance to the dwelling as soon 
as a case is reported, and fumigate the premises after its termination. 

Diphtheria. — There has been a considerable decrease in the 
number of cases of this disease, there being only 39 cases and 8 
deaths in 1892, while in 1891 there were 72 cases and 18 deaths. 

Warning cards are used in dealing with this disease, and we 
fumigate, the same as in cases of scarlet fever. An inspection of the 
premises is also made by the agent of the board, and any sanitary 
defects discovered are required to be remedied as soon as practicable. 

Typhoid Fever. — In 1892 there were 74 cases of typhoid fever 
reported and 11 deaths; a slight increase over the previous year, 
when there were 54 cases and 11 deaths. 

A sanitary inspection of the house and surroundings is made in 
all cases of this disease. We do not, however, fumigate or use a 
warning card. 

The following report of the investigations in regard to the causes 
which led to the unusual prevalence of typhoid fever in Somerville in 
the early fall has been prepared by the Board of Health : — 

In the last week of August of the present year the attention of 
the board was drawn to an unusual appearance of typhoid fever in 
Somerville. A brief investigation showed that there was danger of a 
serious epidemic, and, as the cause of the trouble was not apparent, 
the board appealed for assistance in its inquiry to the State Board of 
Health. The latter responded promptly, and instituted a most care- 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 297 

ful and thorough investigation. Much time was necessarily occupied 
in tracing the cause of the disease, and the State Board has not yet 
prepared its final report. The following letter, however, has been 
received by us : — 

Office of State Board of Health, ) 
Boston, Mass., October 6, 1892. j 
To the Board oj Health of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen, — I am instructed by the State Board of Health to 
inform you that this board has carefully investigated the recent out- 
break of typhoid fev.er in Somerville, and finds that it was probably 
due to the use of infected milk, which had been accidentally con- 
taminated by a local milkman, who was suffering with typhoid fever. 
Since the special contamination and the fever subsided several weeks 
ago, no further anxiety from this source need be felt by the citizens. 
A full report will be published in the near future. 

Respectfully yours, 

Samuel W. Abbott, Secretary. 

The State Board of Health, through its chairman, has also placed 
at our disposal all the information in its possession, and from Pro- 
fessor W. T. Sedgwick, biologist of the board, who personally con_ 
ducted the inquiry, we have obtained the following details: — 

During the twenty-one days between August 20 and September 
10 there were reported to the Board of Health of Somerville no less 
than thirty- five cases of typhoid fever. It was found that one of 
these was an infected case ; one was a very old case tardily reported ; 
and one was probably a secondary case. Deducting these, we have 
thirty-two primary and indigenous cases to be accounted for. In 
respect to water supply and ice supply, these persons did not appear 
to be differently situated from the majority of the citizens of Somer- 
ville. They also had essentially the same air supply and sewerage 
as their neighbors, all of whom remained unaffected. 

The only supply which they are nearly all known to have had in 
common, and which the majority of the citizens of Somerville did not 
share with them, was the milk supply. It was observed very early 
that many of the families in which the cases occurred took milk from 
the same source. Careful inquiry proved that thirty out of the thirty- 
two cases had access to milk coming from one establishment. In 
the absence of any other probable cause, it was, therefore, concluded 
that the outbreak was due to infected milk. 



298 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Inspection of the farms from which the milk appears to have 
come, however, not only revealed no cause for the fever, but showed 
these dairies to be unusually clean and well-kept. Upon one milk 
farm in the same town there was found one case of typhoid fever, 
but there was no evidence that the milk from the farm had had any- 
thing to do with typhoid fever in Somerville. In short, there was 
good reason to believe that the milk upon its arrival in Somerville 
was uninfected. 

But if the milk was free from the germs of typhoid fever upon 
its arrival, it must have become infected while in the hands of the 
local dealers. It was known that one of these was among those 
affected with typhoid fever, but his case had been reported after 
many of the other cases, so that at first he was thought to have merely 
shared in the common misfortune. Closer investigation, however, 
revealed the fact that his illness really dated from a period early 
enough to have enabled him unwittingly to have infected the milk, 
and thus to have been the unconscious cause of the outbreak. Pro- 
fessor Sedgwick, after the most exhaustive investigation, has con- 
cluded that this was probably, in fact, what happened. It was 
affirmed that this patient had never actually handled the milk, but 
had only washed the cans and distributed a part of them to his cus- 
tomers. It was also objected that the cases were chiefly confined 
to Central Hill, while the route of the milk establishment extended 
over a much larger section of the city. But it may well be doubted 
if the operations of "tasting," "mixing," " setting up," etc., which 
took place at the central establishment after most of the milk had 
been carried there from the train upon which it arrived, were really 
so conducted as to exclude the possibility of infection of the milk by 
a person working in the same room and suffering with incipient 
typhoid fever. The appearance of most of the cases on Central Hill, 
comparatively near the milk-house in which the patient worked until 
he was obliged to go to bed, was readily explained when it was 
learned that some customers were often supplied with milk which 
had not been in the milk-house at all, but was delivered directly after 
its arrival upon the train. That this milk appears to have produced 
no fever, while that which unquestionably came through the milk- 
house appears to have been infected^ strengthens the probability that 
the milk-house was the place where the contamination occurred. It 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. ■ 299 

is also to be observed that after the milkman who had the fever took 
to his bed the trouble ceased. 

Tables. — The prevalence of scarlet fever, diphtheria, and 
typhoid fever in the city during the several months of the year 1892 
is shown by the following table, and in the table next following is 
given the number of deaths from these three diseases by months 
during the last ten years : — 



300 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SCARLET FEVER, DIPHTHERIA, AND TYPHOID FEVER REPORTED IN 1892. 





Scarlet Fever. 


Diphtheria. 


Typhoid Fever. 


Months. 


TS 


o 


^i 


'6 


O 


0) . 


13 


"o 


SdS 






u tn 




m <u 




njx; 


U3 D 




oj'rj 






St 


il 




















Ph o 




|p 


^0 


P^ 




I'm-, 

Ph O 


January . . . 


20 






5 


2 


40 






_ 


February . 






42 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


3 


2 


66.6 


March . 








6i 


3 


4.7 


8 


2 


25 


1 


- 


- 


April 








77 


2 


2.6 


6 


2 


33.3 


2 


- 


- 


May . . 








73 


4 


5.4 


4 


1 


25 


1 


- 


- 


June . . 








19 


_ 


_ 


3 


_ 


_ 


1 


- 


- 


July. . 








16 


1 


6.2 


3 


- 


- 


2 


1 


50 


August . 








5 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


26 


1 


3.8 


September 








5 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


25 


4 


16 


October 








12 


1 


8.3 


1 


_ 


- 


8 


3 


37.5 


November 








18 


- 


_ 


2 


1 


50 


4 


- 


- 


December 








21 


3 


14.2 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


" 


Total . 








371 


14 


3.7 


39 


8 


20.5 


74 


11 


14.8 



DEATHS FROM SCARLET FEVER, DIPHTHERIA, AND TYPHOID FEVER IN 

THE LAST TEN YEARS. 





Scarlet Fever. 


Diphtheria. 




Tv 


PHOID F 


EVER. 


Months. 
























1 




































CO 


■* 


lO «o 


t- 


no 


Ol 


o 


^ 


(N 


iri 




in to 


f- 


00 


Ol 


o 


tH 


<N 


CO 


rf 


IC 


<X! 


r^ 


00 


03 


o 


1-1 


<M 




3t) 


r>r) 


00 00 


on 


00 


TO 


m 


en 


as 


m 




m 


00 


00 


00 


00 


05 


35 


35 


«) 


■X) 


«) 


00 


00 


oo 


a) 


o: 


C3 


O 




00 

1-^ 


00 
1-1 


00 00 
1-1 r-l 


00 


00 


00 

1-1 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 
1-1 


00 


00 




00 


00 

1-1 


00 


00 
1-1 


00 


00 

1-1 




00 

1-1 




January . , 


2 


. 


2 




1 


5 










2 


1 



"2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


2 


. 


^ 


3 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


February . . 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


1 


2 


- 


- 


3 


- 


.2 


2 


1 


3 


- 


2 


- 


- 


1 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


March . . 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


4 


1 


1 


- 


3 


3 


3 


1 


- 


- 


- 


4 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 




- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


April . . . 
May . . . 
June . . . 
July . . . 

August . . 
September . 
October . . 


1 


- 


5 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


6 


1 


2 


1 


1 


3 


2 


1 


1 


2 


- 


- 




- 




- 


1 




2 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


2 


1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


4 


I 


2 


2 


4 


- 


1 


6 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 




- 




- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


3 


1 


2 


2 


- 


1 


4 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 




- 






1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


1 


_ 


- 


1 


3 


2 


2 


1 


- 


2 




4 


1 


- 


1 


1 




- 




2 


- 


2 


- 


1 


. 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


1 


_ 


2 


- 


- 


- 




1 


- 


- 


1 


1 




- 




- 


2 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


1 


4 


3 


2 


1 


1 




- 


3 


- 


2 


2 




- 


1 


4 


2 


1 


2 


4 


- 


1 


- 


- 


6 


- 


1 




- 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


3 


4 




3 


3 


- 


3 


- 




2 




3 


1 


1 


2 


3 


November . 


- 


3 


2 


- 11 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


4 


5 


2 


1 


4 




3 


4 


1 


- 


2 




1 


2 


3 


- 


1 


3 


- 


December . 


- 


1 
8 


1 
14 


- 10 


15 


7 


1 
5 


2 


3 
.4 


5 
31 


1 

21 


4 

28 


3 
20 


2 
11 


1 
21 


5 
28 


2 
21 


3 

18 


8 


1 
13 


1 

8 


11 


3 


11 


17 

_ 


7 


10 


11 


- 


Total . . 


6 


3 


31 


11 




HELTorYPE FROimia c. Bcsroir 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 301 



DISTRICTS. 

The accompanying map shows the boundaries of the ten health 
districts into which the city was divided by the Board of Health of 
1878 ; also the locations of common sewers. 

A record has been kept from year to year of the number of 
deaths, the death rate per thousand, the prevalence of dangerous 
diseases, and the number of nuisances abated in these several dis- 
tricts, and is continued in the following tables. 

The estimated population in the several districts was originally 
based on the number of assessed polls in each, and upon the popula* 
tion of the entire city, as shown by the census every five years ; it 
being assumed that the growth in population has been at the same 
rate as the increase in the number of assessed polls, and has been 
uniform throughout the city. 



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tuOO 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



303 



TABLE SHOWING THE FIVE PRINCIPAL CAUSES OF DEATH IN SOMERVILLE 
IN 1892, WITH THE NUMBER AND RATE IN EACH DISTRICT. 





CONSUMP- - 


Heart 






Cholera 








TION. 


Disease. 


Pneumonia. 


Infantum. 


Old 


Age. 






a 




cL 




fi 




a 




Ck 


Districts. 




. o 




(U Q, 




i^a 




S a 


^ 


ij a 








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r^ rt 








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^ 


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^ 


:? 


^ 


:zi 


^ 


^ 


^ 


iz; 


I 


25 


2.98 


]3 


1.55 


14 


1.67 


16 


1.91 


3 


0.36 


II 


6 


0.74 


3 


0.61 


6 


0.7.i 


3 


0,37 


4 


0,49 


Ill 


11 


3.48 


5 


0.95 


3 


0.95 


4 


1.26 


2 


0,63 


IV 


16 


2.86 


8 


1.43 


7 


).25 


2 


0,36 


3 


0.54 


V 


21 


2.37 


16 


1.81 


17 


1.92 


3 


0,34 


14 


1.58 


VI 


12 


6.25 


9 


4.68 


8 


4.16 


5 


2,60 


1 


0.52 


VII 


s 


1.67 


7 


1.46 


7 


1.46 


- 


- 


5 


1.04 


VIII 


7 


4.66 


1 


0.71 


- 


_ 


2 


0,42 


1 


0.71 


IX 


3 


1.17 


9 


3.50 


4 


1.56 


2 


0.78 


1 


0.39 


X 


4 


3.51 


5 


4.40 
1.65 


1 


0.9 


- 


0.81 


1 
35 


0.9 


Total .... 


113 


2.45 


76 


67 


1.46 


37 


0.76 



TABLE OF SCARLET FEVER, DIPHTHERIA, AND TYPHOID FEVER IN EACH 

DISTRICT IN lt92. 





Scarlet Fever. 


Diphtheria. 


Ty 


PHOiD Fever. 




'6 




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d 


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ft 


a 








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54 


3 


6.43 


0.36 


7 


1 


0.83 


0.12 


8 


1 


0.95 


0.12 


II 


80 


3 


9.75 


0.37 


4 


2 


0.49 


0.24 


3 


_ 


0.37 


- 


Ill 


35 


2 


11.38 


0.63 


6 


3 


1.89 


0.95 


3 


1 


0.95 


0.31 


IV 


29 


2 


5.19 


0.36 


5 


1 


0.89 


0.18 


2 


- 


0.36 


- 


V. .... . 


69 


3 


7.78 


0.34 


9 


1 


1.02 


0.11 


34 


5 


3.83 


0.56 


VI 


28 


- 


14.57 


- 


4 


- 


2.08 




8 


1 


4.16 


0.52 


VII 


44 


1 


9.17 


0.21 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


7 


1 


1.46 


0.21 


VIII 


7 


- 


4.96 


- 


1 


- 


0.71 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


IX 


20 


_ 


7.79 


- 


2 


_ 


0.78 


_ 


7 


2 


2.73 


0.78 


X. .... . 


4 


14 


3.59 


- 


1 


- 


0.9 


- 


2 


11 


1.8 


- 


Total 


371 


8.06 


0.3 


39 


8 


0.85 


0.17 


74 


1.61 


.24 



304 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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X 



u 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



305 



NUISANCES ABATED IN EACH DISTRICT IN 1892. 



District. 


I. 


II. 


III. 


IV. 


V. 


VI. 


VII. 


VIII. 


IX. 


X. 


Total. 


Population (estimated). 
























Cellar damp ....... 


13 


5 


_ 


1 


2 




I 


1 


_ 




23 


Cellar open 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Cesspool offensive .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


2 


1 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Cesspool overflowing 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


5 


Connection of drainage pipes 
























defective 


3 


3 


- 


_ 


4 


3 


2 


2 


1 


- 


18 


Connection of gas-pipes defect- 
























ive . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Cows allowed on streets and 
























sidewalks 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


Decomposed meat offensive 


- 


1 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 




Dogs kept in kitchen .... 


- 


- 




1 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


I 


Drainage defective .... 


2 


3 


- 


4 


1 


3 


1 


I 


- 


- 


15 


Drainage emptying in cellar . 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


4 


2 


2 


1 


- 


17 


Drainage emptying on surface . 


5 


1 


2 


4 


1 


6 


4 


1 


- 


3 


27 


Drainage not ventilated . . . 


■1 


3 


1 


1 


3 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1i 


Drain-pipe defective .... 


1 


1 


1 


1 




2 


I 


1 


2 


1 


11 


Goats kept without license . . 


2 


- 


- 


_ 




_ 


- 


- 


- 


- - 


■/ 


Hennery offensive .... 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


4 


Hens kept in cellar .... 


1 


- 


- 


2 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


- 


5 


Manure exposed and offensive 


13 


4 


3 


8 


6 


3 


3 


4 


3 


1 


48 


Manure pit defective .... 


2 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


■- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Manure pit too close to house 


1 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Offal on land 


5 


_ 


1 


2 


4 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


l: 


Offensive odor in and about 
























dwellings 


_ 


7 


3 


3 


K 


_ 


3 


I 


2 


- 


25 


Open cellar under stable . . 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


-■ 


Opening in drain-pipe in cellar 


1 


2 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


7 


Pigs kept withojt license . . 


3 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


- 


I 


- 


8 


Premises filthy 


1 


- 




1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Premises untidy 


12 


1 


2 


2 


11 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


30 


Privy-vault defective .... 


11 


3 


3 


9 


3 


5 


- 


1 


- 


- 


35 


Privy-vault full 


45 


6 


13 


42 


16 


8 


4 


4 


1 


- 


139 


Privy-vault offensive . . . 


61 


8 


17 


6'.3 


29 


15 


9 


7 


2 


1 


218 


Removal of bodies of animals 
























burned at fires 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Rubbish in cellar 


3 


_ 


_ 


2 


_ 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


7 


Sewerage flowing under floor . 


1 


- 


- 


I 


- 


- 


I 


- 


- 


1 


4 


Sewer-gas in house .... 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


Slops thrown on surface . . 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


1- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Stable affected with glanders . 


- 


_ 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


3 


Stable and stable premises 
























filthy and offensive . . . 


4 


1 




- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Stable without drainage . . . 


4 


2 


1 


1 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


3 


Ki 


Stagnant water in house cellar 


2 


_ 


- 


I 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Stagnant water on surface . . 


2 


_ 


3 


_ 


- 


1 


3 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Ventilation under steps offen- 
























sive 


- 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


— 


- 


- 


— 


4 


Waste-pipe defective .... 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Waste-pipe not trapped . . . 


6 


5 


1 


."i 


2 


1 


3 


2 


- 


2 


27 


Water-closet defective . 


11 


3 


- 


2 


I 


1 


4 


I 


- 


- 


23 


Water-closet insufficiently sup 
























plied with water .... 


1 


6 


- 


2 


4 


- 


2 


1 


1 


- 


17 


Water-closet offensive . . . 


2 


1 


- 


1 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Water in cellar 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


v 


Total 


228 


70 


60 


173 


107 


61 


60 


33 


17 


15 


824 



306 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



REGULATIONS OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 



Pub. Stat., Chap. 80, § 18. 

In Board of Health, City of Somerville, ) 

March 22, 1892. f 

Whereas, It is the opinion of the Board of Health of the city 
of Somerville, and it does hereby adjudicate that the following regu- 
lations are necessary for the public health and safety, respecting nui- 
sances, sources of filth, and causes of sickness within the city of 
Somerville, and that it is necessary to make the following regulations 
for the public health and safety ; now therefore it is 

Ordered, That the following regulations, designated, respectively, 
as Chapters I. to X., both inclusive, be and hereby are made and 
adopted, and all regulations previously adopted by this board are 
hereby repealed : — 

CHAPTER I. 

contagious diseases. 

Section 1. It is adjudged that the diseases known as small- 
pox, scarlet fever, diphtheria, typhus fever, and typhoid fever are 
contagious and dangerous to the public health and safety, and may 
easily be contracted from persons or apartments, or at funerals from 
dead bodies which may have been infected by such diseases, and that 
the following provisions of this chapter are necessary for the public 
health and safety in regard to said diseases. 

Sect. 2. Householder to give Notice. — When a householder 
knows that a person within his family, or any member of his house- 
hold, is sick of small-pox, scarlet fever, diphtheria, typhus fever, or 
typhoid fever, he shall immediately give notice thereof to the Board 
of Health. 

Sect. 3. Physician to give Notice. — When a physician knows- 
that a person whom he is called to visit is infected with small-pox. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 307 

scarlet fever, diphtheria, typhus fever, or typhoid fever, he shall im- 
mediately give notice thereof to the Board of Health. 

Sect. 4. Pupils not to attend School. — No pupil shall attend 
the public schools while any member of the household to which such 
pupil belongs, or any occupant of the house in which such pupil 
resides, is sick of small-pox, scarlet fever, diphtheria, or typhus fever, 
or during a period of two weeks after the death, recovery, or removal 
of such sick person ; and any pupil coming from such household 
shall be required to present to the teacher of the school which such 
pupil desires to attend a certificate from the attending physician or 
Board of Health of the facts necessary to entitle him or her to admis- 
sion, in accordance with this regulation. 

Sect. 5. Dwelling to be Labelled. — Every dwelling where a 
case of small-pox, scarlet fever, diphtheria, or typhus fever is known 
to exist shall be immediately conspicuously labelled at its entrance 
with a card marked "Small-pox here," " Scarlet fever here," " Diph- 
theria here," or "Typhus fever here," as the case may be, such card 
there to remain until removed by said board or its agent, or by per- 
mission of said board. 

Sect. 6. Label not to be removed or Persons to visit Dwelling. — 
No person shall, without permission from the Board of Health, re- 
move from any dwelling in said city any card affixed thereto by said 
board, or its agent, or any other person, indicating that any of said 
diseases exist in said dwelling ; nor shall any person obliterate or 
deface such card ; nor shall the occupant of any dwelling to which 
such card may be affixed permit the same to be removed, obliterated, 
or defaced without immediately notifying said board ; nor shall any 
person, except members of the immediate family occupying the same, 
and those whose business calls them there, visit, or be permitted by 
the householder, or any other occupant thereof, to visit, a dwelling 
labelled with a card as aforesaid without the written permission of 
said board. 

Sect. 7. No public Funeral. — No public funeral, and no 
funeral attended by other persons than members, occupying the 
dwelling in which the funeral is held, of the immediate family of 
which the deceased was a member, or those whose business calls 
them there, shall be held over the remains of any person having died 
of small-pox, scarlet fever, diphtheria, or typhus fever, except by 
written consent of the Board of Health, and under such regulations 



308 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



as said board may prescribe ; and every householder, undertaker, or 
other person who shall attend or permit any funeral held in violation 
of the foregoing provisions of this section shall be liable to the pen- 
alty provided by law for violation of any regulation of the Board of 
Health. No person, except members of the immediate family of 
which the deceased was a member, and those whose business calls 
them there, shall, without the written permission of said board, be 
admitted to the house where such death has occurred until after the 
interment has taken place and the premises have been fumigated. 

S ECT. 8. Undertaker to prepare Body and notify Board oj Health, 
and Burial to be made immediately. — In case of any person dying o 
smali-pox, scarlet fever, diphtheria, or typhus fever the undertaker, 
his assistant, or agent shall immediately, upon the death of such 
person, or immediately upon his being notified of the death, or called 
upon to perform any services, wrap the entire body, including the 
face, in a sheet satuated with a ten per cent, solution of chloride of 
zinc, and shall immediately place it in a tight coffin, which shall be 
securely fastened and shall not thereafter be opened. He shall 
notify the Board of Health or its agent of the time when the body is 
to be removed, and shall sign a certificate containing a true state- 
ment of the facts, that he has complied with the foregoing provisions 
of this section; and he, and every other person having charge or 
custody or the right of disposal of the body, shall cause the burial to 
take place immediately, and in all cases within not more than eight 
hours after the time of death, unless further time shall be allowed 
by the said Board of Health. 

Sect. 9. Patient or Body not to he carried in Public Carriage. — 
No owner, driver, or other person having charge of any hackney car- 
riage or other vehicle used as a public conveyance shall receive, or 
permit to be placed, or convey in any manner, in or upon said carriage 
or other vehicle any person sick or infected with small-pox, scarlet 
fever, diphtheria, or typhus fever, or the body of any person who has 
died of either of said diseases, except by written consent of the Board 
of Health and under such regulations as said board may prescribe. 

Sect. 10. Dwelling not to be visited until Fu7?iigated. — Upon 
the death, removal, or recovery of a person sick of small-pox, scarlet 
fever, diphtheria, or typhus fever, no person except members of the 
immediate family of which such sick person was a member, and those 
whose business calls them there, shall thereafter visit, or be permitted 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 309 

by the householder or any other occupant thereof to visit, the dwell- 
ing in which such person was sick as aforesaid until such dwelling 
shall have been fumigated or disinfected by the Board of Health or 
its agent, or to their or his satisfaction. 

CHAPTER II. 

STABLES AND THE REMOVAL OF MANURE. 

Section. 1. Washing of Carriages and Horses^ Care oj Stabler 
and Yards, and Accumulation of Manure. — The owners or occupants 
of livery or other stables within the city of Somerville shall not wash 
or clean carriages or horses, or cause them to be washed or cleaned, 
in the streets or public ways; they shall keep their stables and stable 
yards clean, and no manure shall be allowed to accumulate or remain 
uncovered outside of the stable building. 

Sect. 2. Removal of Manure at certain times, without permit,, 
prohibited. — No person shall remove any manure, or cause or suffer 
the same to be removed, between the first day of May and the first 
day of November, except between twelve o'clock at night and two 
hours after sunrise, without a written permit from the Board of 
Health. 

Sect. 3. Mamter of removing Manure. — No manure shall be 
removed or carried through the streets of this city except in a tight 
canvas-covered vehicle, with the covering so secured to the sides and 
ends of the vehicle as to prevent the manure in process of removal 
from being dropped or left in any street or way of the city. No 
manure shall be loaded into a vehicle in or upon any street, lane, or 
passageway, nor upon or across any sidewalk, without a written per- 
mit from the Board of Health. 



CHAPTER III. 

PRIVY-VAULTS, CESSPOOLS, AND DRAINS. 

Section 1. To be cleansed. — If the owner, agent, or occupant 
of any premises where a privy-vault, cesspool, or drain may be situ- 
ated shall neglect or refuse to cleanse such vault, cesspool, or drain 
after being notified by the chief of police or by the Board of Health 



310 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

or its agent that the same has become offensive, he shall be liable to 
the penalties provided by law. 

Sect. 2. Not to be emptied except as authorized by the Board of 
Health. — No privy-vault or cesspool shall be emptied except by such 
parties, in such manner, and at such time as shall be specially 
authorized by the Board of Health. The owner, agent, or occupant 
of the premises where any privy-vault or cesspool may be situated 
shall always be liable for the expense of emptying the same. 

Sect. 3. Carting of Night-soil or other offensive matter through 
Streets. — No person, unless specially authorized by the Board of 
Health, shall drive any cart, or other vehicle, containing, or used for 
conveying, night-soil or other offensive matter, in any street of the 
city, between the hours of 4 A. M. and 10 P. M., during the months 
of April, May, June, July, August, and September; nor between the 
hours of 5 A. M. and 9 P. M., during the months of October, Novem- 
ber, December, January, February, and March; provided, however, 
that this regulation shall not be understood to conflict with the regu- 
lations of this board concerning " Stables and the Removal of 
Manure," nor to restrict the removal or carting of night-soil in carts 
such as are used in making such removal by what is commonly known 
as the "Odorless" process, provided such removal be made or cart- 
ing done without emitting offensive odors in the streets. 



CHAPTER IV. 

HOUSE-OFFAL. 

Section 1. How to be Kept. — All house-offal and refuse 
animal or vegetable substances shall be placed in suitable vessels 
and kept in some convenient place, to be removed by the persons 
duly authorized for that purpose by the Board of Health. Such 
vessels shall be kept covered, and shall not be permitted to become 
offensive. 

Sect. 2. Not to be Rejnoved without Permit or Co7itract. — No 
person shall remove or carry in or through any street, avenue, square, 
court, lane, place, or alley, within the city, any house-offal, or any 
offensive animal or vegetable substance, without a permit from, or 
contract with, the Board of Health, nor in any manner except such 
as shall be specified in such permit or contract. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 311 

CHAPTER V. 

ASHES AND HOUSE-DIRT. 

Section 1. Removal of, etc. — Ashes and house-dirt to be 
removed by the city shall be kept entirely free and apart from offal 
and filth of any kind, and shall be placed in barrels or other suitable 
vessels on the outer edge of the sidewalk, on such days and at such 
hours as the Board of Health shall from time to time designate, by 
notices left at the dwellings or otherwise. 

CHAPTER VI. 

DEAD ANIMALS AND OFFENSIVE SUBSTANCES. 

Section 1. JSiot to be thrown upon Ground or into any body of 
Water. — No person shall deposit and leave exposed upon the sur- 
face of the ground, nor put into any body of water, in the city, any 
dead animal ; nor shall any person throw or put into or upon any 
public or private way, lot of land, or body of water, any slops, 
decayed vegetables, fish, or other offensive substance whatsoever. 

CHAPTER Vn. 

COLLECTING GREASE. 

Section 1. Permit j or. — No person shall collect or remove 
from any dwelling-house or other place in the city any grease, or 
refuse fatty matter, without first obtaining a permit so to do from the 
Board of Health, and in all respects complying with the conditions of 
such permit. All such permits shall expire on the first day of May,^ 
annually, and may be revoked at any time by the Board of Health ; 
and no person shall receive such a permit without first paying to the 
clerk of said board, for the use of the city, the sum of $2.00. 

CHAPTER VIII. 

GOATS AND SWINE. 

Section 1. Permit to Keep. — No person shall keep a goat or 
swine within the limits of the city without first obtaining a permit so 



312 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

to do from the Board of Health, and in all respects complying with 
the conditions of such permit. All such permits shall expire on the 
first day of May, annually, and may be revoked at any time by the 
Board of Health ; and no person shall receive such a permit without 
first paying to the clerk of said board, for the use of the city, the sum 
of $1.00 for each goat or swine to be kept. * 



CHAPTER IX. 

cows. 

Section 1. Permit to Keep. — No person shall keep, or allow 
to be kept, within the limits of the city, in any building, or on any 
premises, of which he may be the owner, lessee, tenant, or occupant, 
more than one cow, without a written permit from the Board of 
Health. Every person keeping a cow shall cause the place where it 
is kept to be well ventilated and drained, and kept at all times in a 
cleanly and wholesome condition. Such permit may be revoked at 
any time when such revocation shall appear to the board to be neces- 
sary for the public health and safety. All such permits shall expire 
on the first day of May annually. 



CHAPTER X. 

RENDERING. 

Section 1. Forbidden except at Premises Assigned. — By virtue 
of the authority given in chapter 80 of the Public Statutes, the Board 
of Health of the city of Somerville hereby forbids the exercise of the 
trade or employment of rendering tallow (other than fresh tallow), 
lard, grease, fat, bones, or other refuse animal matter, within the 
limits of the city of Somerville, except at such places as have been 
or may hereafter be assigned by said board ; such trade or employ- 
ment being in the opinion of the board a nuisance, hurtful to the 
inhabitants, and the exercise of which is attended by noisome and 
injurious odors. 

Published in Somerville Jotirnal oi March 26, 1892. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



313 



APPROPRIATION FOR HEALTH DEPARTMENT AND 
EXPENDITURES THEREFROM, 1892. 



Credit. 




Appropriation ..... 


$8,000 00 


Receipts : — 




For permits to keep swine and 




goats and to collect grease, 


213 00 


rent of land on Melrose street 




for use for offal . . . 


50 00 



Total credit 



^,263 00 



Debit. 
Expenditures : — 

For agent's salary 
collecting ashes 
collecting offal 
burying dead animals 
vaccine virus 
books, stationery, printing 

etc. 
care of ash dumps 
rent of post-office box 
sulphur .... 
oil of peppermint . 
fumigating 

filling Wigglesworth-street pit 
investigation and report upon 
alleged nuisances at North's 
and Squire's factories 
assistance to agent investigat- 
ing nuisances 
chemical analysis of water 
rent of land on Melrose street, 



. $1,100 00 


4,375 


00 


4,283 


08 


106 


50 


14 


99 


277 


30 


112 


25 


4 


00 


9 


53 


7 


14 


6 


50 


25 


00 



500 00 

56 25 

8 00 
50 00 



Amounts carried forward 



$10,935 54 



^,263 00 



314 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
bedding destroyed by fumiga- 
tion 
services of nurse 
wagons and sleds 
painting and repairs of same 
tools 
car fares 
carriage hire 
incidentals 

Total debit 
Amount overdrawn 



f 10,935 54 


^8,263 00 


5 00 




15 00 




615 00 




160 77 




13 25 




36 05 




33 00 




3 15 




• 


11,816 76 



$3,553 76 



J. FRANK WELLINGTON, Chairman. 
CHARLES H. CRANE. 
A. E. DEARBORN. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



315 



INDEX 

TO THE REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Page, 

Ashes 291 

Cows 312 

Dangerous diseases . . . . . . . . . . . 296 

Death rate, 1892 ( at end of mortality table ) 295 

Deaths 293 

Diphtheria 296 

Districts 331 

Expenses 313 

Filling from Somerville avenue ' . . . 290 

•• Glanders 289' 

Goats 291 

Grease . 291 

House offal 292 

Manure . 291 

Night soil 293 

Nuisances 287 

Organizations . . . 287 

Pedlers 291 

Permits 290 

Population ( at end of mortality table )....... 295 

Scarlet fever . . . . . . 296 

Sewer at Clarendon Hill, West Somerville ...... 289 

Sewer outlet, Mystic avenue ......... 289 

Slaughtering and Rendering Establishments ...... 289 

Swine 290 

Typhoid fever 296 

TABLES. 



Mortality in Somerville, 1892 

" rates of, in districts, in last ten years 
Nuisances abated, 1892 .... 

" in districts, 1892 
Principal causes of death, in districts, 1892 
Scarlet fever, diphtheria, and typhoid fever, 1892 

** " " " deaths in last ten years 

" " " " in districts, 1892 

*' *' " " " in last seven years, 



294 
302 

288 
305 
303 
300 
300 
303 
304 



REPORT 



OF THE 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, February 8, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk, 



In Common Council, February 15, 1893. 
Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of the City Physician, January ], 1893. 

To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council: — 

The following is a summary of my work as city physician for the 
year ending December 31, 1892: — 

Number of visits made, 816. 

Two hundred and twenty-four persons have been treated at the 
office. The number of cases of contagious diseases attended has 
been exceptionally small, and they are as follows : Diphtheria, 2 ; 
scarlet fever, 14; measles, 5; typhoid fever, 4; pneumonia, 7. 

The largest number of deaths is from consumption; out of the 
fourteen cases treated, twelve have died. The deaths from this 
disease have, no doubt, been hastened by the unsanitary conditions 
so often found in and around the homes of the poor, including a lack 
of proper food and clothing. 

Four certificates have been given where persons died unattended 
by a physician. 

One hundred and sixty-two children have been vaccinated. 

Number of persons treated at the police station, twelve. 

Six women have been attended in childbirth. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALVAH B. DEARBORN, 

City Physician, 



REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Common Council, January 18, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports. 

Sent up for concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



Concurred in. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 25, 1898. 
GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



To the City Council of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen, — The trustees of the PubUc Library respectfully 
submit the following report for the year 1892 : — 

The total number of books now belonging to the library is 
21,024, showing an increase of 1,305 during the year. Of this a con- 
siderable number of old books by donation constitutes a portion. 

The number of issues of books was 96,311. 

The condition of the library and the continued demand for the 
supply of its wants seem to warrant the trustees in asking for a 
liberal appropriation. The amount placed in their hands last year* 
proved to be inadequate for the current expenses, and the payment 
of a number of bills was necessarily extended and the purchase of 
valuable publications withheld. This state of things arose partially 
from some confusion in regard to the "dog tax." The amount 
credited to the library fund was found to be smaller than in previous 
years, and much less than the trustees had reason to expect. The 
amount received from the dog tax in 1891 was $2,596.66, while in 
1892 only f 1,003.97 was received. It will be well in the future to 
obtain the amount of the dog tax, if possible, before making the 
appropriation. 

There are other causes which will render a larger expenditure to 
maintain properly the Public Library for the ensuing year unavoid- 
able : — 

L It has been proposed to broaden and extend its privileges, 
especially in limiting the age of children at fourteen years, instead of 
sixteen, who shall be allowed to take out books. It is also proposed 



324 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

to extend the same privileges to the pupils of the High School and 
the first class in the grammar schools, irrespective of age. 

"L The constant wear and tear of books is always expected, 
however much dreaded. The incessant use of popular works can 
have but one result, and that is the annihilation of the material of 
which they are made, and duplicates must be supplied to repair the 
loss. This year has furnished no exception to the rule. 

3, The attention of the trustees has been called to the injurious 
effect which the burning of gas has upon the bindings of books, and 
the suggestion has been made that electric lighting be substituted. 
A further advantage by such a change will be apparent, as the risk 
of fire will be thereby diminished. The superiority of electric over 
gas light will be generally acknowledged. The expense of such a 
change has not yet been ascertained. A careful estimate will, how- 
ever, in due time be made of this, as well as of the other items that 
go to make up the equipment of the library, and submitted later to 
the City Council. 

4. The acquisitions to the library are, with rare exceptions, 
made by purchase. Hardly a notable donation has been made for 
many years. The supply for its support must be, therefore, mainly 
derived from the taxes of property holders. To meet the wants of a 
rapidly increasing population, there must be a corresponding outlay. 

It is not necessary here to descant on the blessings and benefits 
which a good and well-ordered public library may furnish to our 
rajDidly growing population. As an important instrument and aid in 
the education of youth, its advantage will be acknowledged. At all 
events, it has become an established institution, to be maintained at 
public expense. The trustees, therefore, can have no reluctance in 
making this their annual appeal for an ample allowance to be placed 
at their disposal. 

CHARLES S. LINCOLN, President. 

December, 189-'. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen, — The twentieth annual report which I have had the 
honor of presenting to you shows the condition and wants of the 
Hbrary. 

BOOKS. 

We have now 21,024 books belonging to the library, 1,427 having 
been added, and 152 withdrawn during the year. Among books 
added to the reference library are : " History of the Orders of Knight- 
hood," "Glimpses of the World," "Century Dictionary," "Dramatic 
Year Book," " Eminent Scotsmen," " Debates in Massachusetts Con- 
vention," " Allibone's Dictionary Supplement," "History of Plymouth 
County," "History of Essex County," "History of Worcester 
County," " Magnalia Christi Americana," " The Soldier in the Civil 
War," " History of the Tower of London," " Essex Historical Collec- 
tion," " New Hampshire Historical Collection," " Photographs of 
the World," " Dictionary of Hymnology," " Exposition Universelle," 
" Greek and Roman Antiquities," and others. 

For general circulation we have added " Across Thibet," 
" Journeyings in Persia," " Ceylon," "Palms and Pearls," "Sweden 
and the Swedes," " Mahdiism," " Messages of the Books," " History 
of Art," " Dynamo Electric Machinery," "Comparative Embryology," 
"Studies in Chaucer," "Memorials of Edinburgh," "Three Episodes 
of Massachusetts History," "Life of Cotton Mather," "Life of Paul 
Revere," "Memoirs of General Heath," "History of King Philip's 
War," " Chronicles of the Pilgrims," " Duruy's History of Greece," 
"Decisive Events," and others. 

The number of books purchased is much smaller than usual, 
owing to the greatly reduced sum available this year for the purchase 
of books and other necessary expenses. 



326 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The library has been open 304 days, and 96,381 books have been? 
given out. For home use, 95,248, and for reference, 1,063. 

Through our two agencies 9,729 books have been delivered 
and returned with but small expense, and in one case received with- 
out remuneration. The thanks of our committee are due to one wha 
is willing to serve the cause of the library in this way. 

CIRCULATION. 

The largest number given out in any month was 10,462, in 
March; the smallest number given out in any month was 6,053, in 
July. 

The largest number given out on any day was 838, on March 19 ; 
the smallest number on any day was 131, on July 25. The number 
of names registered was 1,732. The number of books covered was 
14,337. 

Eighty-three books have been presented to the library by the 
following persons : — 

C. H. Guild, 1. 

Mrs. M. Munroe, 1. 

Hon. W. H. Hodgkins, 1. 

G. A. Gordon, 1. 

Boston School Committee, 29. 

C. S. Lincoln, 12. 

Mrs. H. E. Creighton, 35. 

E. B. Stillings & Co., 1. 

A. Friend, 1. 

H. F. Woods, 1. 

It is pleasant to know that a book has been read and enjoyed 
before being presented to the library, where its usefulness will be 
demonstrated over and over again. We can imagine an interest in 
the library so great that its shelves might be enriched with many a 
choice volume, and whole ranges be named ( as they are in some 
libraries ) for some generous donor. For there is never any danger 
of a public library being full. Books may accumulate and the 
building be crowded to overflowing, but the library itself can never 
be full. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 327 

As there is no limit to knowledge, so there is no limit to the 
demand for it, and there can never be too many new books to meet 
the wants of all. 

Teachers and scholars are now well supplied with cards. All 
the pupils of the High School, as well as the highest class of the 
grammar schools, being allowed to have cards ; at the age of fourteen, 
also, any resident of the city is entitled to a card, in accordance with 
the new rule of the committee. This rule has but just gone into 
operation, so that no record of its success can be made. 

We always welcome with pleasure the suggestions of those versed 
in any specialty with regard to the books desirable for us to obtain in 
their department. 

In that way I have found books proposed which might not so 
soon have been entered in the library, and which were immediately in 
demand. " Experimental Science '^ is one such book of which we 
have more than one copy, and could use twice as many. 

" Our Country," by Strong, is another, which, when returned to 
us, is always commended as the very best of its kind. 

H. A. ADAMS, Librarian. 



328 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF CITY TREASURER. 



Cr. 



Balance from 1891 


1^3 48 


Appropriation 


4,000 00 


Dog licenses 


1,003 97 


Fines 


420 14 


Catalogues . . . . 


33 90 


A. S. Hudson 


4 00 




$5,465 49 


Balance to 1893 . 


335 44 



$5,800 93 



Dr. 



Salaries . . . . 






$2,110 07 


Books 






2,112 98 


Printing andjstationery 






269 96 


Binding . . . . 






137 35 


Newspapers 






12 00 


Gas 






197 28 


Fuel 






18 00 


Water . . . . 






29 00 


Repairs 






9 64 


Furniture 






102 00 


Gas fixtures 






130 75 


Steam fittings 






460 73 


Expressing . . , 






103 27 


Incidentals . 






7 90 


Branch office « 






100 00 



$5,800 93 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, February 23, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



Concurred in. 



In Common Council, March 1, 1893. 
CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Committee on Highways, January 2, 1893. 

To the City Council : — 

Gentlemen, — The committee on highways presents the follow- 
ing report for the year ending December 31, 1892 : — 

HIGHWAYS ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 
Appropriation $55,000 00 

Receipts and credits : — 

For labor and materials furnished 
prior to January 1, 1892, the 
bills for which remained uncol- 
lected that day . . . . |263 61 

Watering streets account (paving 

around stand-pipes ) . . . 109 25 



Yalue of gravel and sand taken from Wild Cat Hill, 
Value of materials on hand January 1, 1892 
Value of tools and property on hand January 1, 1892, 
Net profit on tools, property, and materials 

Total credit . . . .... 



372 86 


1,950 85 


423 75 


11,293 65 


1,397 96 


$70,439 07 



332 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Debit. 
Expenditures : — 

For laying out Essex, Crocker, Summer streets, 
Stone avenue and Partridge avenue ( advertis- 
ing notices of hearings ) ..... $73 90 

Construction of Streets : — 

Arthur street, Broadway to Bonair, $169 10 

Francesca avenue, Elm street to 

Liberty avenue .... 502 40 

Green street. Summer to Laurel 

street 396 60 

Grove street, Arlington Branch 

R. R. to Morrison street . . 104 00 

Moore street, Holland to Mead 

street 825 46 

Richdale avenue, Sycamore to 

School street .... 432 10 

Tennyson street, Broadway to Med- 

ford street .... 814 90 

Thurston street, between Medford 

street and Richdale avenue . 176 40 

Tremont street, Webster avenue to 

Cambridge line ... 256 00 

Winslow avenue. Elm street to 

Grove street .... 206 95 

3,883 91 



street crossings 2,420 73 

street signs erected . . .... 54 70 

Repairs and improvements of streets 
and paving of gutters in connec- 
tion with setting of edgestones: — 

Arthur street, both sides, Broad- 
way to Bonair, paving . . $367 40 



Amounts carried forward . . $367 40 $6,433 24 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS. 



333 



Amounts brought forward 

Berkeley street, both sides, near 

Hersey to Central street 

paving .... 

Broadway, southwest side. Walnut 
to Cross, paving 

Broadway, southwest side, Nor- 
wood avenue to Magoun square 
paving .... 

Broadway, in front of Lincoln 
School lot, paving 

Chauncey avenue, west side, Broad 
way to Jaques street, paving 

Elm street, west side, Chapel to 
Summit street, paving 

Evergreen avenue, west side, Thurs 
ton to Sycamore street, paving 

Oilman street, north side of estate 
of Osgood to Jasper street, pav- 
ing 

Oilman street, south side, Aldrich 
to Walnut, paving 

repairs . . . . . 

Oreen street, easterly side, Sum- 
mer street to angle, paving 

Orove street, south side. Highland 
avenue to southwest line of 
Highland School lot, paving 

Hathorn street, east side, Broad- 
way to Arlington street, paving. 

Highland avenue, at Highland 
School lot, paving 

Jaques street, east side. Temple 
to Orant street, paving 
repairs , . , . 

Jaques street, west side, Temple 
to Wheatland street, paving 



$867 40 

578 20 
508 10 

388 00 
27 50 
187 25 
140 90 
100 80 

97 90 

288 60 
593 35 

118 00 



),488 24 



27 


15 


91 


30 


41 


00 


104 


65 


838 


30 



232 40 



Amounts carried forward . 



$4,105 30 $6,433 24 



334 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . $4,105 30 $6,433 24 

Joy street, at Bennett School lot, 

paving 42 25 

Lincoln street, in front of estate 

of Junkins and als., paving . 68 15 

Linden avenue, east side. Elm to 

Summer, paving . . . 397 55 

Linden avenue, west side. Elm to 

Summer, paving . . . 322 95 

repairs 442 70 

Madison street, north side. School 

to Sycamore, paving . . 312 70 

Maple street, in front of Jackson 

School lot, paving . . . 46 70 

Mason avenue, paving .' . 48 10 

Medford street, west side, Lowell 
R. R. bridge to Walnut street, 
paving . . . . . 251 90 

Medford street, in front of A. W. 
Follett's estate, corner Broad- 
way, paving .... 74 00 

Montrose street, north side. School 

to Sycamore, paving . . . 278 30 

Myrtle street, in front of estates 

Nos. 34 and 36, paving . . 22 05 

Oliver street, north side, Franklin 

to Glen, paving . . . 160 75 

Oliver street, south side, Franklin 

to Glen, paving .... 117 30 

repairs 290 70 

Orchard street, south side. Day 
street, southeasterly, to Cam- 
bridge line, paving . . . 249 40 

Orchard street, north side, Chester 
street, southeasterly, to Cam- 
bridge line, paving ... 99 20 
repairs . . ,.. , . 278 70 



Amounts carried forward . . $7,608 70 $6,433 24 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS. 335 

Amounts brought forward . $7,608 70 $6,433 24 

Poplar street, in front of Bennett 

School lot, paving ... 59 90 

Porter and Carver streets, in front 

of estate of E. B. Morgan, 

paving ..... 39 40 

School street, in front of estate of 

O. H. Fuller, near Madison 

street, paving .... 24 50 

Tremont street, both sides, Web- 
ster avenue to Cambridge line, 

paving . . . . . 333 25 

Washington street, north side, 

Medford street to Lowell R. R. 

bridge, paving .... 100 30 

Walnut street, west side. Highland 

avenue to near Summit avenue, 

paving . . . . . 75 91 

William street, in front of estate of 

C. H. Lockhart, paving . . 34 90 

8,276 86 



cost to city of sidewalks, the bricks and edge- 
stones for which were furnished or paid for 
by the abutters (see Table D at the end of 
this report) ....... 581 36 

repairs of Broadway, from Cross street to Mar- 
shall street, on account of construction of 
Broadway Parkway and consequent relaying of 
street railway 5,272 20 

Ordinary repairs of streets : — 

Beacon street, Ivaloo to Kent 

street f 857 50 

Bond street, Broadway to Heath 

street 346 00 

Central street, Broadway to Med- 
ford street .... 800 30 



Amounts carried forward . . $2,003 80 $20,563 66 



336 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 

Cross street, Pearl to Medford 
street . . 

Davis square .... 

Day street, Davis square to Cam- 
bridge line .... 

Grove street, Lowell R. R. to Mor- 
rison street . . . . 

Linwood street, Washington street 
to Somerville avenue 

Medford street, Somerville avenue 
to Cambridge line 

Middlesex avenue. Mystic avenue 
to Wellington bridge . 

Mystic avenue, from near Temple 
street, westerly 50 feet 

Pleasant avenue, Vinal avenue to 
Walnut street . 

Sycamore street, Medford street 
to Broadway .... 

general repairs .... 



f 2,003 80 $20,563 66 

*449 20 

387 50 

457 70 
229 50 

2,507 60 

1,408 80 

1,885 10 

62 00 

278 70 



560 50 
13.106 76 



repairs of stone paving . . . . . 

removing snow and ice and care of slippery 
sidewalks ....... 

repairs of brick sidewalks 

cleaning streets ...... 

cleaning and repairing streets after the construe 
tion of sewers and catch-basins 

trimming trees ...... 

repairs of Boston-avenue bridge . 

taking up old culvert on Somerville avenue 

building retaining wall, Washington street, be- 
tween Medford street and the Lowell R. R 
bridge ....... 

Oliver street, sidewalk assessment 

Tremont street, sidewalk assessment . 



23,337 16 
177 38 

1,368 43 

360 83 

3,960 25 

171 20 
643 20 
156 90 

46 88 



760 00 

69 40 

4 62 



Amount carried forward . 



$51,619 91 



$51,619 91 


4 


84 


31 


90 


65 


27 


604 


29 


131 


75 


32 


38 


104 


54 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS. 337 

Amount brought forward .... 

Berkeley street, sidewalk, at Hersey street 
Webster avenue, sidewalk, corner Newton street 
and Webster avenue ..... 

resetting edgestones, Oliver street 
one-half cost of maintenance of Middlesex- avenue 
bridge, the other half being paid by the town 

of Medford 

tax on Waltham gravel land .... 

tax on Wakefield gravel land .... 

shed at gravel pit . . . . 

Tepairs and water tax at dwelling 

at City Farm .... $255 16 

less rent of same . . . 168 00 

87 16 

superintendent's salary ..... 1,600 00 
board of superintendent's horses .... 418 31 
superintendent's telephone . .... 40 00 
books, stationery, and printing . . . . 63 25 
sundry small expenses ..... 153 88 
private work, the bills for which remain uncol- 
lected 532 46 

materials furnished sidewalks account, not paid 

for 02 

Value of materials on hand this day .... 2,485 00 

Value of tools and personal property on hand this 
day : — 



-horses 


$3,900 00 




■carts and implements used with 






horses ..... 


2,663 00 




harnesses and horse clothing 


387 00 




stable utensils and property 


100 00 




tools ...... 


276 10, 




stone crusher, engine, and fittings. 






with bins and sheds . 


1,384 75 




Amou7its carried Jorward . 


$8,710 85 


$57,974 96 



338 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . $8,710 85 $57,974 96 

steam road roller .... 3,503 50 

12,214 35 



Total debit $70,189 31 



Balance unexpended .... $336 41 

Labor and materials have also been furnished and property sold, 
for which payment has been received by the city treasurer, and credit 
received from other accounts as follows : — 

Private parties, constructing driveways and sidewalks, 

sale of old horses and other property . . . $1,197 94 

Watering streets account, paving around stand-pipes, 109 25 

Public property account, setting curbstone at Lincoln 

School 23 00 

Public property account, setting curbstone at Charles 

G. Pope School 33 10 

Sidewalks account, materials and use of horses . 1,837 75 



Total $3,201 04 



The profit and loss account on city teams, tools, property, and 
materials is as follows : — 



Credit. 




Holland-street ledge .... 


$539 14 


Edgestones and paving stock 


1,699 31 


City teams ...... 


424 88 



Total . $2,663 33 

Debit. 

Steam road roller (depreciation) . 
Repairs of steam road roller 
Tools (depreciation) 
Repairs of tools .... 

Amounts carried forward . . $776 60 $2,663 33 



$49 50 


14 


50 


470 


04 


242 


56 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS. 



339 



Amounts brought forward . $776 60 $2,663 33 

Stone-crusher and fittings (deprecia- 
tion) 153 50 

Crushed stone (to which account is 

charged repairs at crusher) . . 335 62 



Total '. . . ... . $1,265 37 

Excess of charges over cost, as stated 

on page 331 $1,397 96 



No charge has been made for the use of the steam road roller 
used on the several streets, except for the time of the engineer. 

Crushed stone used on the streets has been charged at the rate 
of seventy-five cents for each single-horse load at the crusher ; and 
for ballast used, ten cents per single-horse load. 

Gravel and sand has been charged at the rate of twenty-five 
cents for each one-horse load at the bank, being the same price as 
charged last year. 



Number of loads of gravel taken from North-street 
bank ......... 

Number of loads of sand taken from North-street bank. 

Number of loads of stone for crusher from Holland- 
street ledge ........ 

Number of loads of stone for crusher from North- 
street bank ....... 

Number of loads of stone crushed .... 

The charges to the city teams account are as follows 

Horses (depreciation) ...... 

Carts and implements used with horses (depreciation). 
Repairs of same ..... 

Harnesses and horse clothing (depreciation) 
Repairs of same ..... 

Stable utensils and property (depreciation) 

Stable expenses and repairs 

Grain and feed ..... 

Amount carried forward 



7,150 
616 

6,840 



289 


6,154 


> . 
$1,005 00 


254 


82 


704 


18 


54 


00 


450 


26 


46 


20 


713 


68 


2,652 


68 


$5,880 


82 



340 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Am.02int bro2ight forward 
Hay and straw 
Horseshoeing 
Horse medicine and doctoring 

Total 



$5,880 82 

1,930 85 

604 28 

308 17 

$8,724 12, 



The credit to the account amounts to $9,149, being at the rate 
of $1.40 per horse for each day he has worked during the year, 
which shows a credit to city teams account of $424.88, as shown on 
page 338. 

The above statement does not include the keeping or use of the 
superintendent of streets' team, the cost of which is kept separately, 
as stated in the schedule of expenditures. 

Ten new horses have been purchased during the year, and six 
sold; four have died, making the total number, including the two 
used by the superintendent of streets, in charge of the department to 
December 31 twenty-six. 

The Winchester gravel land has been sold during the year to 
Mr. Patrick Nelson, for the sum of $200. 

SIDEWALKS ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 

Appropriation ..... 

Credit from sale of Winchester gravel 
land ...... 

Credit from highways account, mate- 
rials not paid for 

Total credit 

Debit. 
Expenditures : — 

For 35 sidewalks, as per 
table C at the end 
of this report, $20,438 05 

less assessments, 10,219 04 



$10,000 00 




200 00 




02 




. . 


$10,200 02 



$10,219 01 



Amounts carried forward . . $10,219 01 $10,200 02 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS. 



341 



Amounts brought forward 
advertising notices of hearings 

Cost to city . 

Amount overdrawn 



f 10,219 01 $10,200 02 
25 00 



10,244 01 



$43 99 



EDGESTONES AND PAVING STOCK. 

Lineal feet of edgestones set ( including 250 feet reset ), 18,477.3 ; 
square yards of brick paving laid (including 100 yards relaid), 6,318 \ 
square yards of stone paving laid, 6,448. 



BROADWAY PARKWAY ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 

Appropriation $4,500 00 

Transfer from Highland Schoolhouse 

addition account ... 23 41 

Transfer from schoolhouse in Ward 

Three account .... 773 87 

West End Street Railway Company 

(loam) 247 95 



Total credit 



$5,545 23 



Debit. 



Expenditures : — 

For labor 
teaming 
trees . 
stone posts 
edgestones 
lime and cement 
ribbon wire and staples 
sods .... 

Amounts carried forward . 



$977 50 


154 


90 


67 


00 


90 


00 


1,053 


41 


3 


90 


18 


86 


284 


13 



$2,649 70 $5,545 23 



342 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts broughi 


' forward 


$2,649 70 


$5,545 23 


fertilizer 




25 00 




grass seed . 




16 00 




loam . 




2,774 93 




wooden stakes . 




8 37 




catch-basin 


xpended . 


67 17 




Total debit 


• 


5,541 17 


Balance une 


$4 06 



BROADWAY PARKWAY. 

Under authority of an order passed by the City Council, dated 
January 27, a parkway has been constructed in the centre of Broad- 
way, from Cross street to near Sargent avenue, at an expense of 
$5,541.17. The cars of the West End Street Railway Company run 
through the parkway, and on each side of the track the park is 
sodded. Sixty-seven trees have been set out. The construction 
of the parkway not only adds greatly to the personal appearance of 
this part of the highway, but will also materially decrease the 
expense of keeping this part of Broadway in repair, it being at the 
point of its greatest width. 



-HIGHWAYS, PAVING UNION SQUARE AND PARTS OF 
SOMERVILLE AND WEBSTER AVENUES ACCOUNT. 



Credit. 

Appropriation . . . . . 
JReceipts : — 

Jeremiah McCarthy, recutting flag- 
ging 

Total credit 
Amount carried forward . 



$100,000 00 
74 09 



$100,074 09 
$100,074 09 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS. 



.1 j i> 



Amount brought forward 



{^100,074 09^ 



Debit. 



Horatio Gore & Co., contractors 


. $18,965 38 


William H. Gore & Co., contractors 


13,555 74 


Paving blocks 


, 


56,115 50 


Granite flagging 








3,160 33 


Wharfage 








1,200 40 


Edgestones 








590 95 


Bricks . 








712 35 


Lumber 








5 51 


Tools . 








12 00 


Moving poles 








9 80 


Labor . 








1,385 17 


Teaming 








77 50 


Advertising contracts 






90 35 


Printing contracts 






74 30 


Car fares 






16 72 


Total debit . . 


. 


Balanc 


e une 


jxpen 


ded . 


... 



95,972 00- 
$4,102 09^ 



PAVING UNION SQUARE AND PARTS OF SOMERVILLE 
AND WEBSTER AVENUES. 



Under authority of an order passed by the City Council, dated 
July 13, a contract was made with the Rockport Granite Company 
for the furnishing of such paving blocks as should be required for 
the paving of Union square, Somerville avenue, from Medford street 
to Park street, and Webster avenue, from Union square to the Fitch- 
burg railroad crossing. A contract was also made, under authority 
of an order dated July 27, with Messrs. Horatio Gore & Co., and 
with William H. Gore & Co., for paving the same. The work has 
been completed during the year, at a cost of $96,249.77. This sum 
includes the entire expense, except the cost of removing the gravel 
which was spread over the paving at the time it was laid, and the 
amount reserved under the terms of the contracts, amounting to. 



344 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

$3,562.12. This is deemed an economical measure, as the heavy- 
travel over this portion of the city has each year involved a large 
expenditure of money. 

TABLES. 

Tables are furnished herewith, giving lists of streets accepted, 
streets improved, sidewalks constructed for which one-half the cost 
was assessed, sidewalks constructed the bricks and edgestones for 
which were furnished by the abutters, driveways constructed at the 
abutters' expense, and crossings laid. 

WILLIAM L. BARBER, Chairman. 
WILLIAM P. MITCHELL, Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS. 



345 



TABLE A. 

STREETS ACCEPTED. 



Name. 



Crocker . . . 
Essex .... 
Francesca Avenue 
Greene .... 
Grove .... 
Heath .... 
Hudson . . . 
Partridge Avenue 
Stone Avenue . 
Summit . . . 
Winslow Avenue 



From. 



Highland Avenue . 
Medford Street 
Elm Street . . . 
Summer Street . . 
Arlington Branch R.R 
Temple Street . . 
Central Street . . 
Broadway . . . 
Union Square . . 
Elm Street . . . 
Elm Street . . . 



To. 



Crown Street . 
Richdale Avenue 
Liberty Avenue 
Laurel Street . 
Morrison Street 
Bond Street . . 
Lowell Street . 
Vernon Street . 
Columbus Avenue 
Billingham Street 
Grove Street 






528 

282 

762 

555 

325 

1,043 

1,368 

1,457 

676 

262 

514 



TABLE B. 

STREETS IMPROVED. 



Street. 



Arthur . 
Beacon . 
Bond 
Broadway 
Central . 
Cross 
Day . . 
Davis Square 
Francesca Avenue 
Oilman . . 
Greene . . . 
Grove 

Jaques . . . 
Linden Avenue 
Linwood 
Mason Avenue 
Medford . . 
Middlesex Ave. 
Moore . . . 
Mystic Avenue 
Oliver . . . 
Orchard , 
Pleasant 
Richdale 
Sycamore . 
Tennyson . . . 
Thurston . . 
Tremont . . . 
Winslow Avenue 

Total length 



Avenue 
Avenue 



From. 



Broadway . . . 

Ivaloo Street . . 

Broadway . . . 

Cross Street. . . 

Broadway . . . 

Pearl Street . . 

Davis Square . . 

Elm Street . . . 

Elm Street . . . 

Aldrich Street . . 
Summer Street 

Arlington R. R. . 

Temple Street . . 
Summer Street 
Washington Street 

Orchard Street . . 
Somerville Avenue 
Mystic Avenue 
Holland Street 
Near Temple St. 

Glen Street . . . 

Russell Street . . 
Vinal Avenue . 

Sycamore Street . 

Medford Street . 
Medford Street 

Medford Street . 

Webster Avenue . 

Elm Street . . . 

improved ( in feet ) 



To. 



Bonair Street 
Kent Street . 
Heath Street 
Marshall Street 
Medford Street 
Medford Street 
Cambridge Line 
Holland Street 
Liberty Avenue 
Walnut Street 
Laurel Street 
Morrison Street 
Grant Street . 
Elm Street . 
Somerville Ave 
Cambridge Line 
Cambridge Line 
Wellington B'dge 
Mead Street . 
Westerly . . 
Franklin Street 
Chester Street 
Walnut Street 
School Street 
Broadway . 
Forster Street 
Richdale Avenue 
Cambridge Line 
Grove Street . 



Improvement. 



Gravelled 

Macadamized 

Macadamized 

Macadamized 

Macadamized 

Macadamized 

Gravelled . . 

Macadamized 

Ballast . . . 

Macadamized 

Macadamized 

Ballast . . 

Macadamized 

Ballast . . 

Macadamized 

Macadamized 

Ballast . . 

Ballast . . 

Macadamized 

Ballast . . 

Macadamized 

Gravelled . . 

Macadamized 

Gravelled . ~ . 

Macadamized 

Macadamized 

Gravelled 

Ballast . . 

Ballast . . 



Feet. 



438 

500 

350 

2,350 

1,100 

1,600 

940 

200 

762 

700 

555 

340 

700 

1,050 

2,050 

220 

3,000 
695 
50 
470. 
550 
470 
875 

1,250 
469 
310 
589 
514 

23,867 



S46 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE C. 

SIDEWALKS CONSTRUCTED WHERE THE MATERIALS AND LABOR WERE FUR- 
NISHED BY THE CITY, AND ONE-HALF OF THE COST WAS ASSESSED UPON 
THE ABUTTING ESTATES. 



Street. 



Arthur 

Berkeley 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Broadway 



Chauncey Avenue 
Dover 
Elm . . 
Evergreen Ave. 
Gilman 
Gilman . 

Greene . 
Grove 

Hathorn . . . 
Highland Avenue 



Jaques . 
Jaques . 
Joy . . 



Linden Avenue 
Linden Avenue 
Linwood . . 
Madison 
Maple . . . 

Medford . . 



Montrose 

Oliver 

Oliver 

Orchard 

Orchard 

Poplar 



Summit Avenue 

Tremont , . 
Washington 
Webster Avenue 
Wesley Park . 

Total . . 



Side. 



Both . . 
Both . . 
South W 
South W 
South W 

North W 
South E 
North W 
South W 
South W 
North E 

South E 
South E 

Sou h E 
South W 

South W 
North E 
South W 

North W 
South E 
South W 
North E 
South W 

South W 

North E 
North E 
South W 
South W 
North E 
North W 

North E 

Both . . 

North . 

East . . 

Both . . 



From. 



Broadway .... 

Central Street . . 

Cross Street . . . 

Norwood Avenue . 

Easterly line Lin- 
coln School lot 

Broadway . . . 

Davis Square . . 

Chapel Street . . 

Thurston Street 

Aldrich Street . . 

Westerly line estate 

C. B. Osgood . . 

Summer Street . 

Highland Avenue . 

Broadway 

Grove Street . . . 

Temple Street . . 

Temple Street . . 

Poplar Street . . 

Elm Street . . . 

Elm Street . . . 
Somerville Avenue 

School Street . . 

Poplar Street . . 

Walnut Street . . 

School Street . . 

Glen Street . . . 
Glen Street . . 

Day Street . . . 

Chester Street . . 

Joy Street . . . 

Vinal Avenue . . 

Webster Avenue . 

Medford Street . . 

Everett Street . . 

Bow Street . . . 



To. 



Bonair Street 
Hersey Street . 
Walnut Street . 
Medford Street . 
Westerly line Lin- 
coln School lot 
Jaques Street 
Cambridge Line 
Summit Street . 
Sycamore Street 
Walnut Street . 

Jasper Street 
Angle in street . 
South'ly line High 

land School lot 
Arlington Street 
Easterly Ihie High 

land School lot . 
Wheatland Street 
Near Grant Street 
Northerly line Ben 

nett School lot . 
Summer Street . 
Summer Street . 
Washington Street 
Sycamore Street 
North'ly line Jack 

son School lot . 
Boston & Lowell 

Railroad Bridge 
Sycamore Street 
Franklin Street . 
Franklin Street . 
Cambridge Line 
Cambridge Line 
Westerly line Ben 

nett School lot . 
Westerly line estate 

B. F. Thompson 
Cambridge Line 
Tufts Street . . 
Fitchburg Railroad 
Northeasterly . 



(/5 




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b, 


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1,370.7 


- 


1,337.2 


- 


523.1 


- 


257.9 


165 


476.6 


403.8 


_ 


626 


475.9 


481.3 


333 


213 


668.2 


- 


246.4 


174.4 


308.5 


- 


^56 4 


115 


329.4 


- 


137.4 


130 


821.8 


- 


475.7 


- 


149.5 


_ 


1,120 


_ 


1,127.2 


_ 


- 


1,840 


912.7 


- 


129.6 


- 


626.7 


_ 


912.1 


- 


478.5 


316.8 


390.8 


269 


!"86.2 


- 


539.1 


386 


149.3 


- 


_ 


130.6 


1,195.2 


- 


449.5 


523.3 


302.2 


- 


- 


443.9 


18,227.3 


6,218.1 



Cost. 



$663 69 

1,013 55 

1,030 84 

420 18 

308 51 
755 04 
630 '^0 
891 55 
414 79 
438 49 

413 60 

309 65 

222 72 
219 02 

2.S3 60 
f.48 29 
372 C4 

116 86 

820 80 

1,187 01 

1,810 30 

786 10 

90 69 

411 94 
673 95 
682 63 
587 20 
555 75 
846 90 

98 03 

184 75 
734 01 
1,191 34 
247 45 
496 58 

$20,438 05 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS. 



34r 



TABLE D. 

SIDEWALKS CONSTRUCTED WHERE THE EDGESTONES AND BRICKS WERE 
FURNISHED OR PAID FOR BY THE ABUTTERS. 



For. 


Street. 


c/5 
.. <^ 

H H 

(d CO 

w 


O . 


Suther Blaikie 


Hillside Avenue 


134.7 

20.8 
95.5 

32.6 

167.7 
73 

54 

45.1 

64.2 

96.1 

442.7 

226.4 

75.7 

34.5 

95 

13.7 

13.7 

20 8 




Marilla J. Butler 


Prospect Hill Avenue 

Myrtle Street 


107 


Mathew Carley . 


15 


Jemima S. Carvill 


Walnut Street 




Mary E. Chase 

H. A. Clary 

Henry Doaghey 

Charles Drouet 


Beacon Street 

Lincoln Avenue 

Prospect Hill Avenue 

Wesley Park 


150 

.^5 
50 


Caroline M. Egin 


Appleton Street 


80 


Anna Elston 


Greene Street 


31 


A. Ward Follett 


Medford Street, corner Broadway . . 
School Street 




0. H. Fuller 


_ 


Mary T. Graham 


Greene Street 

Greene Street 


67 


David D. Gregg 


35 


Ceylon Hoyt 


Evergreen Avenue, cor. School Street . 
Lincoln Avenue 


70 


L. D. Junkins 




M. P. Lewis 


Lincoln Avenue 




Charles H. Lockhart 


William Street 


_ 


Mason Avenue 

Ellen McCarren 


Orchard Street to Cambridge Line . . 
Greene Street 


30 


Edward B. Morgan 

Herbert W. Raymond 

Edward S. Sparrow 

George M. Stevens, trustee 

Eugene Stilphen 


Porter Street, corner Carver Street . . 
Wesley Park 


4 


Elm Street, corner Highland Avenue 
Walnut Street 


130 

60 


Lincoln Avenue 




Jonathan Stone 


Stone Avenue 


_ 


James A. Strout ... .... 


Greene Street 




Charles F. Swan 


Greene Street 




Daniel Sullivan 


Myrtle Street 


15 


Mary E. Vinal 

J. Frank Wellington 


Webster Avenue 


5() 


Summit Avenue 


18 


G. H. Wildes 


Dover Street 


45 






Totals 


1,706.2 


992 









S48 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE E. 

DRIVEWAYS CONSTRUCTED (AT EXPENSE OF ABUTTERS). 



For. 


Location. 


William Armstrong & Co 

William J. McLean ....... 

George E. Newcomb 

Father O'Brien 


Somerville Avenue 

32 Concord Avenue 

32 Glen Street 


Summer Street 


John P. Squire & Co 


Medford Street 





REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS. 349 



TABLE F. 

CROSSINGS CONSTRUCTED. 

Ames street, in line with westerly side of Central street. 
Eeacon street, in line with westerly side of Sacramento street. 
Browning road, in line with westerly side of Central street. 
Cross street, in front of Baptist Church. 
Cross street, in line with southerly side of Chester avenue. 
Concord avenue, at junction of Newton street. 
Davis square, in line with southerly side of Dover street. 
Davis square, in line with easterly side of Highland avenue. 
Dover street, in line with westerly side of Elm street. 
Delaware street, in line with westerly side of Pearl street. 
Elm street, in line with easterly side of Morrison street. 
Medford street, in line with westerly side of Adams street. 
Medford street, in line with westerly side of Sycamore street. 
Medford street, in line with westerly side of Central street. 
Medford street, in line with easterly side of School street. 
Magoun square, across Medford street. 
Newton street, at junction of Concord avenue. 
School street, in line with easterly side of Medford street. 
Summer street, in line with southerly side of Spring street. 
Washington street, in line with southerly side of Joy street. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON SEWERS, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, February 1, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, February 1, 1893. 
Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Committee on Sewers, January 2, 1893. 
2^0 the Board of Aldermen oj Somerville : — 

The committee on sewers presents the following final report for 

the year 1892: — 

Credit. 

Appropriation $18,000 00 

Receipts and credits: — 

For catch-basin curbs in sidewalks, 
received credit from sidewalks 
account $94 33 

fee for drainage of Asylum build- 
ings into Fitchburg-street sewer, 50 00 

fee for draining estates into Elm- 
street sewer, White-street place 
sewer, Line-street sewer, and 
Elmwood-street sewer . . 238 33 

labor ( paving Somerville avenue, 

etc., account) .... 10 44 

labor and materials furnished in 
1890 the bills for which remained 
uncollected January 1, 1 892 . 14 82 



pay for laborers not called for 
unpaid bills of 1892 . . . . 
Value of materials on hand January 1, 1892 
Value of tools and property January 1, 1892 

Total credit .... 



407 


92 


30 


00 


2,213 


88 


256 


04 


589 


25 


$21,497 09 



354 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Debit. 



as per ac- 



Expenditures : — 

For twenty-two sewers, 
companying table 
less assessments . 



labor on Granite-street sewer (not 
finished December 31) 

labor on Pauline-street and Broad- 
way sewer (not finished Decem- 
ber 31 ) 

labor on McGregor-place sewer 

labor on Broadway sewer, Wallace 
street, easterly, to College ave- 
nue (not finished December 31, 
1892) 



$12,208 32 
9,168 55 

$73 26 



3,855 81 
. 4 38 



680 45 



rebuilding Glen-street sewer ' . . . 
rebuilding Harvard-street sewer . . . . 
twenty-six catch-basins ( average cost, $65.06 ) . 
rebuilding two catch-basins . . . . . 
labor on catch-basin, Delaware street (not built), 
five-ninths cost of removing deposit from mouth 

of Bridge-street sewer 
abatement of sewer assessments . 
repairing sewers and drains . 
flushing sewers and filling catch-basins 
cleaning sewers ..... 
examining sewers .... 

digging to locate sewers 
inspecting house drains 
soundings for ledge .... 
repairs of catch-basins .... 
changing line and grade of catch-basins 
cleaning catch-basins .... 
opening mouths of catch-basins 
changing line and grade of manholes . 

Amount carried fo7'ward 



$3,039 77 



4,613 


90 


556 


69 


404 


25 


1,691 


58 


154 


88 


26 


12 


1,217 


47 


497 


27 


149 


51 


451 


78 


627 


72 


75 


81 


68 


63 


249 40 


49 


71 


25 


41 


554 


56 


1,831 


86 


144 


19 


324 


31 


$16,754 


82 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SEWERS. 



355 



Broadway afc 



Avtount brought forward 

building manhole, Glen street 

building manhole, Union square 

repairing manholes 

cleaning manholes 

locating water-services 

laying outlet for drinking-fountain, 
Medford street . 

teaming stone 

changing grade of bulk-head 

puddling sewer-trenches 

books, stationery, and printing 

arranging tools and property 

repairs of tools and property 

unpaid bills of 1891 

sundry small expenses 

depreciation in value of tools, property, and 
materials ........ 

Value of materials on hand December 31, 1892 
Value of tools and property on hand December 31, 

1892 (including purchases during the year, 

$82.47) 

Total debit 

Balance unexpended ..... 



754 82 


34 


66 


43 


95 


39 


82 


143 


70 


16 


62 


31 


73 


2' 


62 


4 


90 


10 


70 


72 


75 


18 


11 


60 47 


39 


15 


69 47 


221 


32 


168 


60 



657 45 



$18,390 84 
$3,106 25 



Labor and materials have also been furnished, and credit has 
been received for the same, as follows : — 



Broadway Parkway account, catch-basin at parkway, 
Public property account, catch-basin at Pope School, 
Public property account, pointing wall at Pope School, 
Public grounds account, catch-basin. School street, 
Public grounds account, pointing wall at battery 

Total . . . . . . ". 



$58 53 

61 57 

19 66 

53 27 

5 65 

$198 68 



Appended hereto is a table of sewers built during the year. 
The sewer in Olive avenue, which was constructed by an order 
dated December 23, 1891, and referred to this committee as un- 



356 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

finished business of the year 1891, was finished early in January 
by Willard B. Bryne, at a cost of $93.55. 

Under an order dated June 22, a contract was made with Charles 
Linnehan for the construction of a sewer in Granite street, from 
Somerville avenue to Osgood street. The sewer is not as yet com- 
pleted, owing partly to the large amount of ledge in the street. Only 
$73.26 has been paid on said sewer this year. 

By an order dated July 27, a contract was made with Collins & 
Crimmings for the construction of a common sewer in Paulina street 
and Broadway, from Holland street to Broadway, and in Broadway, 
from Paulina street to Wallace street. This sewer is unfinished, but 
work will be resumed early in the spring. Three thousand eight 
hundred and thirty-six dollars and forty-six cents has been paid on 
this sewer. 

Under the same order, a contract was made with Willard B. 
Bryne for the construction of a sewer in Broadway, from Wallace 
street to College avenue. Six hundred and eighty dollars and forty- 
five cents has been expended during the year. This sewer will be 
finished during the coming season. 

Work on these sewers was abandoned late in the fall, owing to 
the weather. They are trunk sewers, constructed for the reception 
of smaller sewers, draining the locality in the vicinity of Elm street, 
College avenue, and Billingham street. 

The sewer in Harvard street, from Beach street to Elm place, 
was rebuilt at a lower grade in order to furnish drainage for estates 
in Elm place. The city was obliged to bear the entire expense, as 
the cost of the sewer when first constructed was assessed. The cost 
of rebuilding the sewer was $404.25. 

The sewer in Glen street and private lands was rebuilt through 
private lands, southwesterly 100 feet, and in Glen street north- 
easterly 164 feet, at a cost to the city of $556.69, the old sewer built 
in 1871 having been found defective. 



'& 



For the committee, 



CHARLES B. OSGOOD, C/ia/rman. 
WILLIAM P. MITCHELL, 67^;-/'. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SEWERS. 



357 




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ANNUAL REPORTS. 









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REPORT 



OF THE 



CITY ENGINEER. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, April 12, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports^ 

Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, April 12, 1893. 
Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of City Engineer, Somerville, March 15, 1893. 

To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council: — 

In compliance with City Ordinance, Chapter 9, Section 9, the 
following report of the city engineer for the year ending December 
31, 1892, is respectfully submitted: — 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

The number of persons permanently employed during the year 
1892 has been eight. The expenses of the department have been as 
follows: — 

Salary of city engineer ..... 

Salary of assistants ...... 

Instruments and supplies . . 
•Car fares . 



$2,400 00 


4,392 


88 


168 


42 


66 


16 



$7,027 46 

The items of expenditure for salaries of assistants are as fol- 
lows: — 

Giving lines and grades for edgestones and brick side- 
walks, examining titles of abutters, and computing 
assessments of cost $593 22 

Giving lines and grades for defining street lines, for 
grading and macadamizing streets, revising accept- 
ance plans, and examining titles of abutters , 459 94 



Amount carried forward ..... $1,053 16 



362 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward $1,053 16 

Making surveys and giving lines and grades for public 
sewers, examining titles of abutters, computing 
assessments and making assessment plans, locating 
and recording private drains, giving lines and 
grades for building catch-basins, and rebuilding 
old sewers 1,084 63 

Giving lines and grades for laying water pipe, making 
surveys and plans, locating and recording locations 
of mains and house services, and plans for a 
wooden building to be located at the high-service 
pumping station . . 

City survey ......... 

Grades and lines for department of public grounds 

Surveys, grades, lines, and estimates, Nathan Tufts 
Park ......... 

Making plans for numbering streets and affixing num- 
bers to houses . . . . 

Indexing note-books and plans and keeping office 
records ......... 

Copying plans, Middlesex Registry of Deeds, and work 
done for the assessors' department 

New city map ........ 

Surveys, grades, and lines connected with changes in 
street railway track locations .... 

Surveys, grades, and lines for laying out and construc- 
tion of Broadway Parkway ..... 

Surveys, plans, grades, lines, and estimates for paving 
Somerville avenue, from Medford street to Park 
street. Union square, and Webster avenue, from 
Union square to the Fitchburg railroad . . 623 86 

Miscellaneous, including five sets of maps made for fire 
department, showing location of hydrants by wards, 
plans and sketches for police and law depart- 
ments, to be used in accident and criminal cases, 
grades and lines for curbstone on street lines at 
certain schoolhouses ...... 300 59 

$4,392 88 



221 


58 


183 


59 


53 


56 


388 


10 


189 


21 


26 


60 


38 


35 


101 


26 


34 


87 


93 


52 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 363 



CITY SURVEY. 

No progress has been made on the city survey. Until this 
survey is completed, it will be irnpossible to make accurate valuation 
plans for the assessors' department, and sectional plans of the city. 
These plans, when completed, will be used in adjusting street and 
estate lines ; in making sewer and sidewalk plans and assessments ; 
for recording the location of street intersections and street lines; for 
indicating the position of sewers, gas and water mains, manholes, 
catch-basins, monuments, trees, edgestones, etc. ; in preparing 
drainage plans for those portions of the city in which sewers have 
not been constructed ; and in opening and locating new streets. 

As a basis on which such a survey may be made, and to correct 
and adjust surveys and traverses already made, it is necessary that 
the relative positions of many points should be determined. From 
these points the exact distance to any other point, as well as the 
length of the lines joining these points, could be accurately deter- 
mined. In this way errors which are now apparent in local surveys 
would be eliminated, and an exact and accurate plan of the whole or 
any part of the city, of any street, alley, or house lot could be made 
with the least amount of work and with absolute accuracy. 

The method by which the relative position of the several points 
or stations is determined is called triangulation. 

The value of accurate plots of blocks for the assessors' use 
must be comprehended and admitted by every one who has had any 
experience with municipal affairs. The value of such plans when 
made and their usefulness ought to be comprehended when it is 
stated that assessed areas have been computed from plans made 
thirty to forty years ago, when the area included within the city lines 
was almost like pasture land, and the property lines defined by these 
plans have been in many cases long since destroyed. It is often 
impossible to locate new transfers from the description given in 
deeds, especially where small parcels of land are sold from large 
tracts of unoccupied land, of which there is no survey or plan in 
existence. On many streets where the lines are not established 
large areas of unoccupied lands are now about to be divided into 
house lots, and the street lines can better be established now, before 
the land is occupied, than at a later period. Areas have been carried 
by deed from one person to another, and errors in copying or possi- 



364 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ble intentional changes have produced discrepancies which may never 
appear until some such survey is made. 

This is an experience which has come to a great many cities and 
towns in this vicinity, and it has invariably been stated, whenever I 
have inquired, that the increased valuation obtained from the errors 
discovered in areas of land has more than paid for the cost of the 
surveys. 

That the importance of undertaking this work immediately may 
be impressed on the minds of the City Council, I will copy from the 
report of the year 1891 the following: — 

" Only about one-third of the area of the city has been com- 
pletely surveyed, and in that portion of the city northwest of Cedar 
street nothing has been done, except the establishment of street 
lines on Somerville avenue and Elm street. Summer street, Highland 
avenue, and Broadway. Sectional maps have been in existence for 
several years, but have not been completed, and no progress has 
been made on them for several years. Many sectional surveys and 
traverses have been made, but have never been connected, and errors 
prevent the combination of these surveys. The only reason which 
can be given for the lack of progress is that the office force has not 
been sufficiently large to undertake any work outside of the routin e 
work on streets and sewers." 

As will be seen in the items of expenditure on page 362, only a 
small amount ($183.59) has been expended for work which pertained 
to the city survey. 

Surveys required to complete sewer assessments and record 
plans, to locate houses for street numbers, and for records of house 
sewers and water service location, comprise all the work done which 
could properly pertain to the city survey. 

The probability that such a survey would inevitably be made at 
an early date has been remembered, and what has been done dur- 
ing the year 1892 will be of service when it is completed. 

When the work on the survey outlined above is commenced, it 
should be done under a special order of the City Council, and by an 
engineering party outside of the force regularly employed. Precise 
and accurate work can only be done by a party that will give its 
entire time to the work. 

From a study of the reports on file in the office, I have ascer- 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 365 

tained that, in 1883, the sum of three hundred dollars was appropri- 
ated to defray the cost of a special city survey. I have found no 
record of any appropriation since that date, and it is indeed a small 
sum for nine years' work. I would, therefore, recommend that a. 
special appropriation of $500 be made to commence this work, 

STREET MONUMENTS. 

That monuments should be placed at street intersections, and at 
such other points as ma)/ be necessary to properly mark deflections 
or changes in the alignment of the street lines, is of the greatest 
importance, and is, perhaps, of as much value to a city or town as 
any work which a city engineer may be called upon to perform. On 
the exactness of the location of street lines rests the correct location 
of property lines and the imaginary lines which separate a man's 
property from that of his neighbors. 

Plans on which the exact location of street lines are shown, and 
note-books showing buildings, fences, offsets, etc., be they ever so 
carefully and neatly drawn, are not of the least importance if there 
are not some objects on the ground to which such measurements can 
be referred. It is well known that plans and note-books are very 
seldom deposited in fire-proof vaults, and if plans or note-books are 
destroyed, how will it be possible to locate street lines unless meas- 
urements are placed to mark street intersections and angles? Then, 
too, a careless assistant may mislay a note-book, and thus destroy, 
perhaps, evidences of the location of the lines of twenty or thirty 
streets. The practice, now so common, of removing street fences 
and fences on division lines must make the re-location of street and 
property lines all the more difficult, unless the street intersections are 
marked by some method indestructible by fire, frost, water, or the 
unaccountable mischief of persons, who often remove evidences of 
lines, as stakes, posts, rods, trees, walls, etc. 

From an investigation of reports and records in this office, I find 
that about 117 monuments now exist which were set in 1860, 100 
were set in 1877, and thirty-five in 1884. That is, only 252 monu- 
ments have been set and are now in use in Somerville in thirty-three 
years, and that with about fifty miles of public streets. 

Lest it might seem that the present engineer has been negligent, 
I would say that requests have been made repeatedly to the commit- 



366 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

tee on highways for an appropriation for this purpose, but no appro- 
priation has yet been made. I am of the opinion that it would be 
expedient to pass an ordinance requiring the city engineer to place 
annually as many monuments as may be necessary to properly define 
street lines, and that the committee on finance include annually in its 
appropriation bill a sum sufficient to pay the cost of this work. 

The practice of removing street and division fences, already 
alluded to under "city survey," will tend to cause serious complica- 
tions in titles to real estate, unless some immovable method of locat- 
ing street lines shall be adopted, and all fences be referred to these 
immovable landmarks. 

I would, therefore, recommend that the sum of ^500 be appro- 
priated for placing stone monuments at such locations as the city 
engineer may deem necessary. 

OFFICE ACCOMMODATION. 

It has long been evident that the facilities for properly arrang- 
ing plans, note-books, etc., in the department are entirely inadequate 
to its needs. 

The office is small and poorly arranged for the number of men 
employed, and it is even necessary to locate some of the office help 
in another part of the City Hall, be3^ond the control of the engineer. 
The present arrangement for filing plans is so small, and the books 
and plans are so crowded, that it is only with extreme care that plans 
can be used without injury. The safe for plans and note-books is 
small, and its construction is such that if the building were destroyed 
by fire, the contents, if not entirely destroyed, would be of very little 
value. The loss of note-books and plans would be a severe one, and 
it would be impossible to replace them at any cost. The records of 
location and depths of sewer and water mains, the plans of highway 
locations, the surveys of streets, lands, and buildings, levels and 
grades for highways, and land plans of which no other copies can 
now be obtained, all would be destroyed. The cost of constructing 
a new vault would seem to be exceedingly small when compared with 
the value of the records and plans now contained in the present 
vault. The cost of a new vault, when compared with the cost of 
duplicating these valuable records, ought not to be considered for a 
moment. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



367 



I would, therefore, recommend that this question receive your 
early consideration, and that immediate steps be taken to provide 
safe and suitable accommodations for the department and its records, 

CITY MAP. 

The only existing map of the city now in this office was made in 
1883. So many changes in street lines have been made, and new 
streets have been laid out, that this map is of very little value. 

In 1891 some work preliminary to making a new map was under- 
taken, and, at that time, traverses were compiled and a skeleton 
traverse made through the following streets: Broadway, Holland and 
Elm streets, Union square, Washington and Mount Vernon streets. 
Another traverse by way of Washington street. Union square, Somer- 
ville avenue, Beacon, Cambridge, and Medford streets, Fitchburg 
and Boston & Lowell railroad locations is now being computed, 
A third traverse by way of Broadway, City line, Mystic avenue, and 
Union street will be made. These three traverses will be referred to 
that part of the northerly line of Highland avenue between Cedar 
street and Davis square, and the co-ordinates of every point of these 
traverses will be computed and recorded. From these computations 
a map of the city can be drawn which will be accurate within the 
limits of a scale of 2 4Vo- The portion of the map included within 
the lines of the traverse first above mentioned has been plotted, and 
comprises the larger part of the city. 

PAVING UNION SQUARE AND PORTIONS OF SOMERVILLE AND 

WEBSTER AVENUES. 

April 13, 1892, the committee on highways was authorized to 
solicit proposals for paving these streets, and an appropriation of 
$100,000 was made for doing the work. July 14, 1892, a contract 
was signed with the Rockport Granite Company for furnishing granite 
paving blocks. July 29th a contract was signed with Horatio Gore 
& Co. for paving Section 1. July 30th a contract was signed with 
William H. Gore & Co. for paving Section 2. 

The area between the edgestones and outside rails of the 
street railway tracks and the area between the tracks was paved 
by the city. The area between the rails of both tracks was 



368 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

paved by the street railway company ; each party in interest furnished 
and laid the paving in the areas, as above described. 

The blocks used in the work done by the city were the best 
quality of Rockport granite, and were cut to the following dimen- 
sions: width, 3^ to 4^ inches; length, 8 to 12 inches, and to average 
not less than 10 inches; depth, 7 to 8 inches. Under the terras of 
the contract the blocks were delivered subject to inspection on the 
wharf. The contract price was $72 per thousand delivered on the 
wharf. Seven hundred and seventy-nine thousand three hundred 
and eighty-two blocks were used. 

The average cut due to the change in grade from the macadam 
to the paved surface was five inches, and the average depth of exca- 
vation for the gravel foundation was eleven inches, making a total 
average excavation of sixteen inches. 

The pavement was laid on a gravel foundation four inches in 
thickness, with sufficient bedding sand to bring the granite blocks to 
the proper grade. The joints were filled with fine gravel, rammed, 
and the paving was covered with screened gravel one inch in thick- 
ness. Edgestones were reset and pointed on joints and face, and 
the brick sidewalks repaved where required. 

Cross-walks were laid with granite flagging twenty-four inches 
wide, not less than three feet in length, and not less than seven inches 
in thickness; rough pointed on top, and jointed on ends and sides. 
The flagging was delivered on the work by the city at a cost to the 
city of $0.36 per square foot. 

The granite blocks were hauled from the wharf by the contractor 
for paving and regulating, and at his expense. By the terms of the 
contract the contractor was required to maintain the pavement for 
the period of six months from the date of the final completion of his 
contract, not including the months of December, January, February, 
and March. 

The items of cost of work done in paving Sections 1 and 2 com- 
bined are as follows: — 

779,382 granite blocks, including wharfage, culling, 
piling, printing contracts and specifications, 
tools, lumber, and sundries ..... $58,477 41 



Amount carried forward .... $58,477 41 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



369 



Amount brought forward . 

11,012.9 lin. ft. edgestone reset . 

350.25 lin. ft. edgestones furnished and 
delivered ..... 

7,454.34 sq.ft. granite flagging delivered, 

3,451.00 sq. ft. North River flagging 
delivered ..... 

52,683 bricks delivered .... 

28,838.63 sq. yds. granite block paving 

5,072.03 sq. yds. sidewalk relaid . 

1,132.40 sq. yds. crossings laid . . , 

Eighty-six days inspecting of materials and work 

Labor at dump, Lowell street, city lot, piling cobble 
stones from old gutters and spreading surplus 
material from excavation ..... 

Labor and materials, changing grade of sidewalk, bulk- 
heads, and reservoir covers. Union square 

Changing location of two electric light poles 

Extra work and materials 

Printing contracts and specifications, paving 
regulating ...... 

Advertising proposals, paving, and regulating 

Car fares . . . . " . 



Less cost of edgestone and labor for 
sidewalk, Webster avenue, east side, 
Everett street to the railroad 
( charged to sidewalk account) 
Labor lowering edgestone for 
driveway .... 



Net cost of the work done 
The cost of changing grades of reser- 
voir, catch-basins, and manholes 
was ...... 



. 


158,477 41 




2,826 54 


f 45 


185 78 


$0 36 


2,683 56 


) 571^ 


992 16 




698 92 


. 


29,399 99 


, 


2,332 08 




1,261 71 


rk . 


430 00 



and 



77 36 



10 


44 


9 


80 


101 


41 


74 30 


68 


60 


8 


97 


$99,639 03 



$20: 


2 19 
66 










202 


S'S 








. 


$99,436 


18 



$449 20 



Amounts carried forward . 



$449 20 $99,436 18 



370 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amotmts brought forward . $449 20 $99,436 1^ 
The cost of building eight new catch- 
basins 536 74 

985 94 



(This work was charged to the sewer depart- 
ment, although it was occasioned directly by the 

paving of Somerville and Webster avenues.) 

Total cost of paving . . $100,422 12. 

Six new catch-basins were built on Somerville avenue, and two 
on Webster avenue. These new basins were required because the 
edgestones were set practically level, and the proper fall in the 
gutter could only be obtained by using summits in the gutters to dis- 
charge the surface water into the basins. Forty-one catch-basins and 
thirteen manholes were adjusted to the new lines and grades. The 
cost of these new basins and changes was $945.52, and was charged 
to the appropriation for sewers. 

The superfluous material excavated from the roadway was 
removed from the street by contractors; such portion of this material 
as was required by the city was removed by the contractor at his 
expense and delivered at certain points determined by the city engi- 
neer. This material was used in grading certain streets and filling 
adjacent low lands, in most cases to abate nuisances, and was of 
great value to the city. It is certain that in many of the streets 
graded no work of this kind could have ever been done, had not the 
material for filling been obtained in this way. 

Seven thousand four hundred and eighty cubic yards of material 
were excavated from the roadway ; 14,440 linear feet of street were 
filled ; 46,000 square yards of surface were covered. 

In Appendix F will be found a canvass of bids for paving and 
regulating Union square, Somerville and Webster avenues. 

WORK DONE AT MIDDLESEX REGISTRY OF DEEDS, EAST CAMBRIDGE. 

Tracings have been made of all plans of real estate filed at the 
registry of deeds during the past year, and a copy of the plan index 
has been made, giving the name of the street, owner's and surveyor's 
names, date and record number of every plan on record. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 371 

SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

ITEMS OF EXPENDITURES. 

Assessments for twenty-one sewers . $7,446 35 
Amount assumed by the city . . 1,309 03 



Total cost of construction .... $8,755 38 

Sewers partially completed December 31, and not 
assessed in 1892 : — 

Granite street 73 26 

•Sewers in West Somerville, that portion of the cost 
of these sewers assumed by the city to be paid 
from money borrowed on funded debt account : — 

Willow avenue, from Elm 

street to Hawthorne 

street, assessment . $1,722 20 
Assumed by the city . 1,730 74 

$3,452 94 



Sewers uncompleted December 31 and 
not assessed, to be paid from 
funded account: — 

Sewer in Paulina street 

and Broadway . . $3,836 46 

Sewer in Broadway, Wal- 
lace street, easterly . 680 45 



4,516 91 



Total cost of West Somerville sewers to 

December 31 . . .... 7,969 85 

Cost of rebuilding sewer in Glen street 

and private lands (see Appendix A), $556 69 



Amounts carried forward . . $556 69 $16,798 49 



372 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
Building manhole, Glen street and pri- 
vate lands sewer .... 
Cost of rebuilding Harvard-street sewer 
(see Appendix A) 

Total cost of sewers rebuilt 
Cost of twenty-six catch-basins 
Cost of rebuilding two catch-basins 



$556 69 $16,798 49 



34 66 



404 25 



$1,091 58 
154 88 



995 60 



Total cost of catch-basins built and rebuilt 
Cost of rebuilding manhole in Union square on Bow- 
street sewer, on account of change in location of 
horse railway tracks . . .... 

Cost of laying outlet of drinking fountain at Magoun 
square ......... 

Inspection, private drains . . . . . . 

Maintenance (see report of committee on sewers) 
Net decrease in value of materials, tools, and 
property ........ 

Sundry expenses . . . . . . . 

Net expenditures for 1892 .... 

Labor and materials furnished other city departments 
for which credit has been received 

Total cost of work done in 1892 



1,846 46 



43 95 



31 


73 


253 


78 


6,468 


02. 


200 


88 


73 


99 


$26,712 


90 



198 68- 



$26,911 5& 



Seven thousand nine hundred and sixty feet, or one and five- 
tenths miles, of public sewers were built during the year 1892. 

The sewers in Glen street and in private lands, from Glen street 
to near Cutter street, and in Harvard street, from Beach street to- 
near Elm place, were rebuilt at a cost of $995.60. 

WILLOW-AVENUE SEWERS. 



In the year 1885 a (brick) sewer, twenty-four inches by seventeen 
inches, was laid in Highland avenue, from Cherry street to Willow 
avenue, and in Willow avenue a sewer, thirty inches by twenty inches 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 6id 

diameter, was laid from Highland avenue to Hawthorne street. At 
Hawthorne street it discharged by a temporary connection, twelve 
inches in diameter, into the twelve-inch sewer in Hawthorne street. 
In the year 1879 a brick sewer, thirty inches in diameter, was laid in 
Highland avenue east of Cedar street, and in 1889 it was extended 
to near Central street ; this sewer discharged at that time by a 
twelve-inch connection into the sewer in Cedar street, southerly. 

Although but little storm water was taken into this sewer, yet a 
considerable deposit was made in the Cedar-street sewer, so much 
so that a twelve-inch pipe was laid, connecting the two sections of 
the brick sewer in Highland avenue from Cedar street easterly and 
Cherry street westerly, and through this twelve-inch connection the 
storm water was discharged by way of Willow avenue and the twelve- 
inch connection at Hawthorne street. This new line of disposal only 
removed the trouble formerly existing at Cedar street to Hawthorne 
street. 

To finally dispose of this question of storm water discharge, the 
Willow-avenue sewer was extended from Hawthorne street to Elm 
street. This sewer further provides for an outlet for sewers to be 
laid in Summer street, Charnwood and Gordonia roads, and in 
streets to be laid through a portion of the Ayer and Tufts estates. 
The twelve-inch pipe sewer in Highland avenue, between Cedar 
street and Cherry street, is not to be considered as being perma- 
nently a part of the main sewers above referred to, and must only be 
used as an outlet for Highland avenue from Cedar street easterly 
until such time as a main sewer may be constructed in the Lowell 
railroad location, when the Highland- avenue sewer must be deflected 
northerly through Cedar street to the railroad. 

REBUILDING SEWER IN GLEN STREET AND PRIVATE LANDS. 

This sewer is twenty-four inches in diameter, and was built of 
brick, under a contract with I. C. Cushing, in 1871. For several years 
it has been in an unsatisfactory condition, and has been repaired 
several times. During the early summer many complaints were 
made by people in the vicinity that the sewage came through the 
sewer and flooded adjacent lands. 

The complaints became so frequent that examinations were made, 
from which it appeared that the sewer had settled considerably, that 



374 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

portions of the arch had fallen in, and for a considerable distance the 
depth of covering on the arch was less than twelve inches. Rod 
soundings were taken to determine the character of the material 
underlying the sewer and the cause of the settlement. From these 
soundings it appeared that the sewer was laid on mud varying in 
thickness from eight to twenty feet, and, so far as ascertained by pre- 
liminary work, no effort had been made to support the sewer laterally. 
Work of rebuilding was begun in October, and after the old sewer 
had been removed, it was found that a cradle had been laid under 
the invert, but that no support had been given to the haunches, and 
the trench had been back-filled with mud. Levels taken on the invert 
indicated that it had settled, or possibly had been laid from two 
inches to twenty-four inches below the probable grade line. It was 
thought best not to disturb the invert and cradle, but to lay a course 
of two-inch planking outside the cradle of sufficient width on which 
to build the brick walls, or backing, to provide lateral support for the 
invert. On this platform these side walls were carried up with the 
invert to a height sufficient to support the arch. A new water line 
was established, and the new work was laid solid on the old invert up 
to the new water line. The arch was then turned, as is usually done. 
At the place where the settlement was twenty-four inches the deposit 
in the sewer had accumulated within two inches of the top of the 
sewer, and it is probable that the sewer was so reduced in size that 
the pressure from the water, when the sewer was running full in time 
of rain, and the lack of sufficient covering on the arch to protect it 
from frost, were assisting causes in the destruction of the sewer. A 
manhole was built at the intersection of the private lands sewer with 
the sewer in Glen street. 

This sewer has been examined during the winter, and appears to 
be in a satisfactory condition. The cost of rebuilding was assumed 
by the city. 

REBUILDING SEWER IN HARVARD STREET. 

The sewer in Harvard street, from Beach street to Elm place, was 
rebuilt at a lower grade to provide sewerage for the estates on Elm 
place. The grade was lowered about six and one-half feet at Elm 
place, and at this point a drop manhole was built to connect the new 
and old grades. The cost of rebuilding was assumed by the city. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 375 

The length of public sewers built by the city to January 1, 1893^ 
is forty-eight and eighty-six one-hundredths (48.86) miles. 

The total cost of the system to date, not including sewers uncom- 
pleted December 31, 1892, has been $815,208. 

Plans have been made showing the location and profile of sewers 
built during the year, the location of inlets and manholes, the owners' 
names, the areas and frontages assessed, and the amount of assess- 
ment on each estate as levied by the Board of Aldermen. 

Taking of land plans for sewers in White-street place and Jose- 
phine avenue, from Morrison avenue to Frederick avenue, have been 
made and filed. 

Thirty-three preliminary profiles for sewers have also been made 
during the year. 

PRIVATE DRAINS. 

Five hundred and seventy-two permits for laying house drains 
and thirty-six for repairs were issued in 1892. All new drains have 
been located with reference, to the location of the house and sewer 
and will be properly entered in the note-books and recorded on the 
assessment plans. The cost of inspection has been $253.78. 

The inspection of house drains, so far as this work has been 
attended to during the past year, has been accomplished by one man 
who has also been required to act as inspector on sewer construction ; 
and although this work has been as faithfully attended to as was 
possible within the time which the inspector was able to give to it^ 
yet the results were not satisfactory. Especially was this true in the 
method ot back-filling trenches, and of the condition in which the 
surface of the street was left after the trench was filled. Further, 
the inspector of house-drains will hereafter give his whole time to 
this work, and the drain-layers must be required to lay the entire 
drain from sewer to house before back-filling the trench, and keep 
the same open until the whole line of pipe has been inspected. 

CATCH-BASINS. 

Twenty-six catch-basins were built, at a total cost of $1,091.58. 
Two have been rebuilt, at a cost of $154.88. 

The number of catch-basins in use December 31, 1892, was 711. 






6 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Three catch-basins have been repaired, at a cost of $25.41 ; an 
average cost of $8.47 per catch-basin. 

The cost of changing the grade and line of sixty-five catch-basins 
was $554.56, an average cost of $8.53 per catch-basin. 

Eleven hundred and forty-nine catch-basins were cleaned, and 
2,207 loads, or 2,585 cubic yards, of material were removed from the 
basins and carried to a dump, at a total cost of $1,831.86 ; an aver- 
age cost per basin of $1.59; per load, of $0.82; per cubic yard, 
of $0.71. 

The cost of removing ice, snow, gravel, and other materials from 
catch-basin openings has been $144.19. 

CLEANING AND REPAIRING SEWERS AND MANHOLES. 

Twenty-three miles of pipe sewers have been flushed, at a cost of 
$451.78, and an average cost per mile of $15.29, or $3.72 per thou- 
sand feet. The method of flushing is as follows : A ball to which 
is attached a rope of sufficient length to reach between manholes is 
inserted in the sewer at a manhole. After closing the sewer at the 
manhole, water from a hydrant is allowed to accumulate in the man- 
hole ; the sewer is then opened, and the water rushing under the ball 
forces the deposit in the sewer to the next manhole, where the deposit 
is removed, and the flushing continued. 

Two, and nine-tenths (2.9) miles of brick sewers have been 
cleaned, at a cost of $627.72; an average cost of $216.45 per mile, or 
$41.16 per thousand feet. The methods of cleaning are drawing an 
iron bucket between manholes by horse-power on sewers less than 
three feet in diameter, employing two men, horse and driver; on 
larger sewers, by shovelling the deposit into boats floated or drawn 
through the sewer between manholes, and hoisting the materials in 
buckets by hand derrick to the surface. The number of men em- 
ployed has been five, with one single cart and driver. 

The cost of cleaning outfall ditches at Winthrop avenue, Austin, 
North Union, and Waverly streets was $180.95. 

The cost of cleaning sewers and catch-basins might be consider- 
ably reduced if more attention were paid to removing deposits in 
gutters, at the foot of steep grades, and near catch-basins. As this 
work properly belongs to the highway department, it would be proper 
for that department to provide for it. It is more economical to 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 37T 

remove this material from the gutters than from the catch-basins and 
sewers. The cost of repairing streets will be much less if the gutters 
are cleaned and the water confined to the gutters. 

The cost of changing the grade and line of forty-one manholes 
was $324.31 ; an average cost of $7.91 per manhole. 

The cost of repairing two manholes was $39.82. 

The cost of cleaning manhole dirt-catchers was $144.42. 

BRIDGE-STREET OUTLET. 

The cost of dredging done was $2,191.45. 
The items of cost are as follows : — 

3,523 cubic yards material dredged 

at $0.55 $1,937 65 

Labor, advertising, teaming, water, oil 

clothing 253 80 

$2,191 4a 



Of this amount, five-ninths, or $1,217.47, was paid by the city of 
Somerville, the balance by the city of Cambridge. 

INTERCEPTING SEWER IN THE LOCATION OF THE BOSTON AND 

LOWELL RAILROAD. 

The attention of the City Council has been called to the neces- 
sity for the construction of this sewer in the several annual reports 
of the city engineer since 1888. 

Every year the necessity for making some provision for the dis- 
tricts which might be drained into a sewer constructed in the Lowell 
railroad locations becomes more apparent. Perhaps all that may be 
written in addition to what has been previously printed in the reports 
of previous years is that the damage done by the overflow of storm 
water from the existing sewers is more extended, and the demands 
for sewers in new locations become more urgent each year. The 
sewerage of the Powder House farm and the Ayer estate ; the sewers 
needed in Broadway, from Magoun square to Liberty avenue, in 
Cedar street, from Broadway to the Boston & Lowell railroad, which 
cannot be constructed because there is no outlet for them ; the dis- 



878 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

posal of storm water from the southerly slope of Winter Hill, between 
Cedar street and School street, as well as the northerly slope of 
Spring Hill, from Cedar street to Central street, including the dis- 
trict known as " Polly Swamp,'' and the flooding of cellars in the 
vicinity of School and Medford streets, Medford and Marshall 
streets, and in East Somerville east of Cross street, are problems 
which demand immediate investigation, and which depend for their 
solution on the construction of an intercepting sewer on the Lowell 
railroad location. 

So long as the solution of the problem for the disposal of storm 
water is postponed, just so much more will the damage to property 
and inconvenience to the public be increased. Particularly is this 
true in the district bounded by Broadway, Hinckley, Lowell, Vernon, 
Central, and Medford streets. 

The sewers already constructed were designed to dispose of 
house drainage only. No provision for storm-water sewers was made 
at the time these sewers were constructed. The storm water must 
find its own channels by way of street gutters to vacant land, not 
only to the damage of street surfaces, but also to the injury of pri- 
vate lands and dwelling-houses. 

The present methods must continue until storm-water sewers are 
constructed in these streets, and connected with the proposed inter- 
cepting sewer. 

The flooding of cellars at the intersection of School and Medford 
streets, and at Medford and Marshall streets, is caused by the back 
water from the Medford-street sewer. This sewer drains the area 
bounded by Marshall street, Broadway, Adams and Medford streets, 
and is but twenty-eight inches in diameter; while to properly dispose 
of the storm water from this area a sewer double the capacity should 
be built, a fact which is of itself a sufficient cause for the damage 
done, and can only be remedied by the disposal of the excess of 
storm water by some other means. 

The flooding of cellars in East Somerville is likewise due to back 
water from sewers of insufficient capacity. 

The sewer in Cross street intercepts the sewage from the area 
bounded by Mount Vernon, Broadway, Adams, Medford, and Central 
streets, Highland avenue, Medford, Cross, and Pearl streets, an area 
of about 300 acres, except a small area drained by the sewer in Mar- 
shall street. As this sewer is but thirty-six inches in diameter, it is 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 3T9 

probably discharged under a head of three or four feet, which is 
sufficient to raise the sewage above the bottom of the cellars. It is, 
readily seen that the sewage, when at an elevation in the sewer 
above the cellar floor, will back up through the house drains into the 
cellars. 

To remedy this trouble it will be necessary to consider what the 
probable location of the proposed main sewer above referred to will 
be and how it can be located to relieve the sewers in East Somerville, 
It does not appear that this proposed sewer is needed in the railroad 
location east of Walnut street; and at this point it is only necessary- 
to consider the probable location of an outlet. Further, as it is. 
preferable that the outlet should be within the city limits, it is proba- 
ble an outlet would be located on the Mystic river at, or near, the 
present outlet of the culvert under Middlesex avenue, where the 
Winthrop-avenue sewer outfall ditch now discharges. 

In locating this sewer a route might be selected by way of Gil- 
man, Aldrich, Flint, and Rush streets, Broadway, and New Cross 
street to Mystic and Middlesex avenues. The Pearl and Cross streets 
sewers could be connected at Rush and Pearl streets, and the Glen- 
street and private lands sewer could be intercepted at Rush and 
Brooks streets. 

At these connections storm overflows could be constructed, 
which would relieve the old sewers. This plan would probably 
remove the cause of all existing troubles in the locations above 
referred to. 

I would recommend that the committee on sewers be given full 
powers to investigate and report to the City Council plans and esti- 
mate of cost of the construction of this intercepting sewer. 

EXTENSION OF THE WINTHROP-AVENUE SEWER, 

The necessity for the extension of this sewer to the Mystic river 
has been alluded to in the annual reports of the city engineer since 
the year 1888. When it is known that this sewer, which is five feet 
in diameter, intercepts the sewage from an area of about ninety 
acres, containing a population of about twenty thousand; and, further, 
that it discharges through an open ditch eight hundred feet long into 
tide water; that for at least eight hours out of twenty-four there is 
absolutely no discharge from this sewer, and for four hours more 



380 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

there is very little discharge, because the tide gates at the end of the 
outfall ditch are closed by the high tide, — it must be evident that 
there can be no other result than that a very offensive odor will be 
given off by the sewage while it is retained in the ditch by the tide 
and by the solid matter which is deposited on the bottom and sides 
of the ditch, and is exposed to the sun during the hours of low water 
in the ditch. Your attention is particularly called to the report for 
the year 1888, in which additional reasons for the extension of this 
sewer are given. The recommendations of the previous four 
years are continued and repeated, and your attention is hereby called 
to the necessity of making some provision for carrying out these 
recommendations. 

ELM-STREET SEWER. 

In the report of the city engineer for the year 1891 it was 
recommended that a storm overflow be constructed at Cedar street 
from the Elm-street high level sewer into the Beacon and Elm streets 
sewer. This work was not done last year, because the appropriation 
for sewers was not large enough to provide for it. It is hoped that 
some means will be provided this year. 

EXTENSION OF SEWERAGE SYSTEM IN WEST SOMERVILLE, BROADWAY 

AND ELM-STREET DISTRICT. 

September 9th a contract was signed with Timothy F. Crimmings 
and Dennis C. Collins for the construction of a sewer in Paulina 
street, and in Broadway, from Paulina street easterly to Wallace 
street, September 23d a contract was signed with Willard B. Byrne 
for the extension of this sewer from Wallace street easterly to Elm 
street. 

The Paulina-street sewer is built of brick, egg-shaped, eight 
inches thick, thirty inches by forty-five inches, and is 838.75 feet in 
length. The sewer in Broadway between Paulina and Wallace streets 
is built of brick, eight inches thick, egg-shaped, twenty-six inches by 
thirty-nine inches, and is 854.8 feet in length. 

These two sewers were completed December 23d, at a total 
cost of $9,274.93, including seven manholes and the cost of exca- 
vating 335.23 cubic yards of rock. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 381 

Work on the extension of this sewer from Wallace street to Elm 
street was closed for the season about the middle of December, and 
will be resumed early in the spring. 

This sewer was built of brick, four inches thick, egg-shaped, is 
twenty-two inches by thirty-three inches. About 133.06 linear feet of 
this sewer has been completed. It is expected the entire system will 
be completed during the coming year, at a total estimated cost, includ- 
ing the cost of the sewer in Willow avenue, of about $24,000, and a 
cost to the city, exclusive of assessments, of about $17,000. 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

The work of construction has been continued during the year. 
On February 24th, 1893, of the entire line of sewer from the outer 
-end of the outfall at Deer Island to the Somerville and Cambridge 
city line by way of the Asylum grounds, Poplar and Medford streets, 
all but 4,800 feet was either under contract or being done by the day. 

Of the Alewife brook branch, all but 5,800 feet was either under 
contract or being done by the day. 

EXTENSION OF THE SEWERAGE SYSTEM IN WEST SOMERVILLE, CLAREN- 

. DON HILL DISTRICT. 

In that portion of West Somerville bounded by the Arlington 
branch railroad. North avenue, Alewife brook, Broadway, and Holland 
street no sewers have been constructed, except in a limited area 
bounded by Holland, Elmwood, Mead, and Newbury streets. 

A small brook runs through about the centre of this area, and 
into this brook all surface water, as well as the house drainage, is 
discharged. In some places the brook is very shallow and has a very 
slight fall, and the water is spread over extended areas in stagnant 
pools, and in warm weather becomes very offensive. In houses 
adjacent to the brook considerable sickness has been noticed of a 
character directly traceable to this stagnant or slow-running brook. 
It is important that some improvement should be made of a tem- 
porary character which will more quickly dispose of the surface water. 

Immediate steps should also be taken to dispose of the house 
drainage by a separate system of sewers, and the storm water by 
covered channels, — the house drainage to discharge into the Metro- 



382 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

politan sewer near Alewife brook, and the storm water into the- 
present brook west of Cameron avenue. 

WOODBINE-STREET DISTRICT. 

For several years the attention of the City Council has been 
directed to the unhealthy condition of this locality. The topography 
is very flat, and but little natural drainage can be expected. There 
must, therefore, be in this locality considerable stagnant water. This 
in itself would not be unhealthy, but might be objectionable ; but if 
the house drainage is allowed to flow out on the surface, the danger 
to health from this lack of drainage is more evident. There 
are in this locality twelve houses from which the house drainage is 
discharged on the surface of the ground immediately adjacent to the 
houses. A sewer should be constructed through Woodbine street 
and across private lands and discharged into the sewer in Albion 
street. 

All new work in the sewer department has been done by contract. 

TABLES. 

A table may be found in Appendix A, showing the location, size^ 
cost per foot, assessment, and cost to the city of sewers built in the 
year 1892. 

HIGHWAYS. 

The work of the highway department does not come under the 
charge of the city engineer, and the following items and details are 
given below simply for information. 

The cost and quantities have been compiled from the report of 
the committee on highways, and from the records and measurements 
of work done on file in the office of the city engineer. 

The work of the highway department is done under the direc- 
tion of the superintendent of streets, Mr. Thomas H. Eames, to 
whom I am indebted for many facts from which my figures have been 
compiled, as well as for the uniform courtesy and assistance I have 
received from him during the year. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 

The appropriation for highways for 1890 was 
Add for collections for work done in former years, 
watering streets account (paving at stand-pipes), 
materials on hand, tools and property, profit on 
tools, property, and materials, and unpaid bills 
for materials . . ..... 



The items of expenditures are as follows: — 

Laying out streets, advertising notices of hearings . 

Construction of streets . . . . . . 

Street crossings ........ 

Street signs erected . . . . . . . 

Repairs and improvement of streets in connection 
with setting edgestones . . . . . 

Repairs of Broadway, Cross to Marshall, on account 
of constructing Broadway Parkway and conse- 
quent relaying of street railway tracks 

Ordinary repairs of streets . . . . , . 

General repairs of streets . . . . . . 

Cleaning streets . . . . . . . 

Labor, laying brick and edgestone for single estates. 

Repairs of brick sidewalks . . . . . . 

Repairs and draw-tender's salary on bridges 

Retaining wall Washington street, Medford street to 
Shawmut street ; grading and sodding slope and 
setting curbing Shawmut street to Boston & 
Lowell Railroad ...... 

Removing snow and ice from streets and sidewalks 

Work done on sidewalks not assessed 

Taxes on gravel land . 

Shed at Wild Cat Hill gravel bank 

Repairs at City Farm building 

Superintendent's salary 

Board of horses .... 

Use of telephone 

Amount carried forward 



383 
$55,000 00 



826 37 



$55,826 37 


$73 90 


3,883 


91 


2,420 


73 


54 


70 



8,276 86 



5,272 20 

10,230 40 

13,331 02 

4,774 65 

581 36 

426 10 

761 19 



760 


00 


1,368 


43 


110 


78 


164 


13 


104 


54 


87 


16 


1,600 


00 


418 


31 


40 


00 


$54,740 37 



384 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward .... $54,740 3T 

Books, stationery, and printing ..... 63 25 

Sundry expenses . . . .... 153 88 

Private work not paid for in 1892 . . . . 532 46 



EDGESTONE AND BRICK SIDEWALKS. 



Total cost of work done . .... $55,48996 
Balance unexpended ..... 336 41 



$55,826 37 



The appropriation for edgestone and brick sidewalks 

was $10,000 00 

Credit, sale of Winchester gravel land . . . 200 00 

Credit for materials 02 



$10,200 02 



Thirty-five sidewalks were laid in 1892, at a cost of . $20,438 05 
Less assessments . . . .... 10,219 04 



$10,219 01 
Advertising notices of hearings . .... 25 00- 



Cost to city $10,244 01 

Excess of expenditure over appropriation . . . $43 99 

The work done is itemized as follows: — 

Eighteen thousand two hundred and twenty-seven linear feet of 
edgestone. 

Six thousand two hundred and eighteen and one-tenth square 
yards of brick sidewalk. 

The repairs made on the main avenues in the city were confined 
to Broadway, from Cross to Marshall, Middlesex avenue, from Mystic 
avenue northwesterly, and Beacon street, from Kent street to Ivaloo 
street. In addition to this, Somerville avenue, Webster avenue, and 
Union square were paved. A descriptive account of this work of 
paving will be found under the head " City Engineer's Department," 
on page 367. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



REPAIRS ON BROADWAY. 



385 



The repairs on Broadway were consequent upon the construction 
of the parkway and the incident change in the grade and location of 
the street railway tracks, alluded to under the head of ''Broadway 
Parkway." The surface of the old roadway to a depth sufficient to 
allow for five inches of broken stone, and one inch of gravel in the 
roadway as rebuilt, and to conform to the grade of the parkway and 
the street railway tracks. The easterly half of the roadway was 
macadamized with stone purchased of the Massachusetts Broken 
Stone Co., the westerly half with stone from the city ledge ] the latter 
stone is of soft slaty rock, the former of very hard trap rock. It will 
be of interest to notice the comparative value of the two kinds of 
rock, as both sides will be subject to the same wear. The cost of 
this work, as taken from the report of the committee on highways, 
was $5,272.20. 

MIDDLESEX AVENUE. 

In the reports of the city engineer for the years of 1891 and 
1892, reference was made to the condition of the roadway of this ave- 
nue. It was barely safe for travel, and its condition was not at all 
creditable to the city. The surface of the road has been raised about 
twelve inches. About one-half the length of the street was covered 
with material excavated from the street surface on the site of the 
parkway on Broadway ; the remainder, with small ballast from a neigh- 
boring ledge. The stone was covered with a clayey gravel taken 
from that portion of Ten Hills Farm immediately adjoining the ave- 
nue. The cost of this work, as taken from the report of the commit- 
tee on highways, was $1,885.10. 

BEACON STREET. 

The repairs were made by removing the old surface and adding 
about five inches of ballast covered with two inches of broken stone 
screened from the old material and one inch of gravel. 

This part of Beacon street has been in exceedingly bad condi- 
tion for a long time. The total cost of the improvement, as stated in 
the report of the committee on highways, was $857.50. 



386 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



LINWOOD STREET. 

This street was re-macadamized. About five inches of broken 
stone was used and covered with one inch of gravel. The stone was 
purchased of F. W. Mead; the gravel teamed from Wild Cat Hill. 
The total cost of this work, as stated in the report of the committee 
on highways, was $2,507.60. The length of the street improved was 
2,050 feet. 

In 1885 this street was filled and macadamized at a cost of 
$3,920.40 ; the linear feet of street improved at that time was 2,100. 

If it were necessary to know what the annual cost of maintain- 
ing this street was, it should be remembered that the surface of this 
street was practically worn out in 1888, and its actual wearing time 
was not more than three years. 

MEDFORD STREET, SOMERVILLE AVENUE TO THE CAMBRIDGE LINE. 

In the year 1890 this street was thoroughly macadamized from 
the Fitchburg railroad to the Cambridge line with Mead stone. It 
was very thoroughly constructed, and was as good an example of a 
macadamized road as was ever built. At the end of a year the sur- 
face of the roadway was badly worn, and in the spring of 1892 it was 
entirely worn out. It has been in that condition ever since. 

To account for so speedy destruction of a well-built macadam 
road, it is perhaps enough to state that the travel is unusually heavy 
and the subsoil unusually unsuitable for any road constructed with a 
gravel surface, whether of macadam or telford construction. The 
extremely large amount of teaming done by the North Packing & 
Provision Co., John P. Squire & Co., and the New England Dressed 
Meat & Wool Co., and the heavy loads which these teams carry, con- 
sidered in connection with the nature of the subsoil, which was for- 
merly marsh and is probably the most unsuitable for a foundation 
for any road intended for heavy traffic which could be encountered, 
are sufficient reasons for the results which appear in the complete 
destruction of the street surface. 

The cost of the work done in 1890 was $1,235.56; and when it 
is known that the macadam road wore only one year, it must be evi- 
dent that its maintenance is very expensive. Some method of street 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 387 

construction more in keeping with the traffic over it should be deter- 
mined upon before any further repairs are made. 

MEDFORD STREET, GRANITE BLOCK PAVING. 

The arguments advanced for paving Somerville avenue, coni- 
pleted during the past year, will apply with greater force to the pav- 
ing of Medford street. The heavy travel is more concentrated than 
in Somerville avenue, and the street in that proportion more expen- 
sive to maintain. 

The economy in paving is more evident if the cost of mainten- 
ance of a macadam road is compared with the first cost of paving. 
The cost of maintenance in a paved surface, if well laid on a good 
foundation, is so small for the first ten years that it can be omitted 
in a comparative statement of the cost of a macadam and paved 
street in this location. 

The cost of paving Medford street, from Somerville avenue to 
the Cambridge city line, with granite blocks on a concrete foundation, 
not including the laying of any new edgestone or brick sidewalks, 
would not exceed $23,000. If the cost of the repairs in 1890 be in- 
creased in the proportion in which the increased length of street to 
be paved exceeds the length repaired in 1890, the estimated cost of 
repairing the length proposed to be paved would be $1,900. This 
sum would capitalize $47,500 at four per cent. ; a sum more than 
double the cost of paving with granite blocks. If it is assumed that 
the macadam road would wear eighteen months instead of one year, 
an annual expenditure of $1,267 would be required to maintain a 
macadam road ; a sum sufficient to capitalize $31,675 at four per 
cent., a sum which exceeds the cost of laying a granite block pave- 
ment by about $9,000. 

In short, an annual expenditure for a macadam surface of not 
less than $1,900 per year, or an annual interest account of four per 
cent, on $23,000, or $920, for a paved surface. 

A further, but more indirect, benefit will result from the saving 
in wear and tear in horses, wagons, and harness, and the cost of 
repairing and replacing broken springs, axles, etc., which are often 
caused by the bad condition of a bad road surface ; also from the 
saving in time and labor in hauling heavy loads over a paved surface 
in contrast with a macadam road when not in perfect condition. 



388 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The cost of repairs in 1892 from Somerville avenue to the Fitch- 
burg railroad, as stated in the report of the committee on highways, 
was $1,408.80. These repairs extended over a greater length of 
street, but were not as extensive as in 1890. 

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS OF STREETS IN CONNECTION WITH 

SETTING EDGESTONES. 

Edgestones were set on thirty-three streets. If the cost of work 
done on Linden avenue be taken from the total cost of repairs, the 
cost of repairs per linear foot of edgestone set, including the cost of 
paved gutters, would be $0.45. 

LINDEN-AVENUE REPAIRS. 

On the plan and profile showing the line and grade of Linden 
avenue under which the street was accepted, the grade of the centre 
of the street was the only grade given. As the walk on the easterly 
side was about two feet higher than the westerly side, it was not 
thought that the grade line, as shown on the plan, was sufficiently 
definite to allow the city to construct sidewalks in such a way as 
would provide for the best and safest cross section of the street, 
without a considerable risk of having claims presented for grade 
damages. 

For this reason, a new plan was prepared, showing the grade of 
both edgestone lines, and after a release from claims for grade dam- 
ages was obtained from abutters, the plan showing the change in 
grade was adopted by the City Council. The work of grading the 
street and paving gutters was afterwards completed, at a cost of 
$1,163.24. The cost of street construction per linear foot of edge- 
stone laid was $0.52. 

CONSTRUCTION OF STREETS. 

The average cost per linear foot for streets constructed was 
$0.90; the average width of roadway is twenty-seven feet. Total 
cost, $21,411.51. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 389 



WASHINGTON STREET, RETAINING WALL AND STREET IMPROVEMENT. 

On the northwesterly line of Washington street, from Medford 
street to the Boston & Lowell railroad location, no permanent side- 
walk was ever constructed. In that part of the street between the 
Boston & Lowell location and Tufts street a retaining wall and pier 
was constructed in 1887, at the time the new bridge was built, and a 
sidewalk was partially constructed at that time. On that part of the 
street first mentioned, the sidewalk as used was elevated from eigh- 
teen inches to three feet above the surface of the roadway, and be- 
tween it and the roadway a rough, unsightly, and irregular slope had 
been formed by the action of water and in other ways, until it was 
very objectionable in appearance, and dangerous to travel in wet 
weather and particularly after dark. No improvement in the surface 
of the sidewalk could be made unless a brick sidewalk was con- 
structed, and with the construction of the brick sidewalk came the 
necessity for maintaining a permanent slope between the sidewalk 
and the roadway. No great change in the grade as it then existed 
could have been made without causing heavy grade damages. 

The grades for a new sidewalk and the existing roadway were 
carefully studied, and two plans were submitted to the committee on 
highways : one, to construct a retaining wall on the edgestone line 
from Medford street to the railroad location, the grade of the top of 
the wall to conform substantially to the existing surface of the side- 
walk as it was used; the second, to construct a wall on the edgestone 
line between Medford and Shawmut streets, to set an edgestone from 
Shawmut street to the railroad location to conform substantially to 
the grade of the sidewalk as then used; to grade a regular slope from 
the edgestone to the roadway surface ; and to set a curbing at the 
foot of the slope to protect the grass slope and support the earth 
slope and the paved gutter in the roadway. 

The second plan was approved by the committee on highways, 
because it seemed to provide an easier means of access to abutting 
estates, and was deemed to be less unsightly than a retaining wall. 

The wall and slopes were constructed and an iron fence made of 
wrought-iron pipe was erected on the edgestone at the top of the 
slope. The work was done by the highway department; the grades 



390 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

and lines were furnished by the engineering department, but no plans 
for the wall were prepared. 

The cost of the whole work, as stated in the report of the com- 
mittee on highways, was $760. 

EDGESTONE AND BRICK SIDEWALK LAID IN SOMERVILLE, 
DECEMBER 31, 1892. 

280,285 linear feet, or 53.07 miles, of edgestone. 
5,284 linear feet, or 33.19 miles, of brick sidewalk. 

TABLES. 

In Appendix B will be found a table showing location and cost 
of edgestone and brick sidewalks and paved gutters, and of roadways 
constructed in streets where edgestone and sidewalks have been laid 
in 1892. 

The average cost of repairing, grading and macadamizing per 
linear foot of edgestone laid, as computed from this table, is about 
$1.59. 

In Appendix C will be found a table showing the location and 
cost of street improvements made during the year. 

In Appendix D will be found a table showing the location, 
length and width of streets accepted in 1892. Plans for these 
streets, as submitted by the abutters, have been revised and corrected- 

In Appendix E will be found a table showing the location and 
length of public and private streets. 

STREETS NUMBERED. 

By vote of the City Council in 1890, the city engineer was re- 
quired to affix a street number to every house and building in the 
city ; and to furnish numbers free of expense to the owner. 

By this method of furnishing numbers, it is possible to fix a num- 
ber to every building in the city before it is occupied; for the 
amount saved by the owner, the cost of the numbers, probably con- 
siderably increases the demand for numbers, and also distributes the 
work of numbering more equally through the year. 

Previous to May 1 the street numbers as used are compared with 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 391 

the street numbering plans ; errors are corrected and numbers are 
affixed to houses where none are found. 

At the time the above-mentioned vote was passed, to comply 
with its requirements, about 135 plans of 349 streets and courts were 
prepared. These plans were compiled in a very short time, and were 
not in proper form for record plans. 

During the past year these plans have been duplicated in proper 
form for record whenever the office work would permit. 

BRIDGES. 



Bridges over the Boston and Lowell Railroad. 



CROSS, CENTRAL, AND CEDAR STREETS BRIDGES. 

These bridges are all iron bridges, comparatively new, and are 
in good condition. 

WALNUT-STREET BRIDGE. 

This bridge is in good condition. The southerly abutment has 
moved outward and is not safe. It should be rebuilt at once. 

MEDFORD-STREET BRIDGE. 

This bridge is in good condition. The iron work has been 
painted and the wooden floor timbers and deck planking have been 
renewed the past year. 

SCHOOL-STREET BRIDGE. 

The bridge, approaches, and abutments are in good condition. 

SYCAMORE-STREET BRIDGE. 

The approaches and bridge are in good condition. The surface 
water should be diverted from the street into the drainage ditches on 
either end of the bridge and not be allowed to run over the wall, as it 
now does. 



392 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



BROADWAY BRIDGE. 

The wooden bridge, which has for some time been in an unsatis- 
factory, if not unsafe, condition, has been removed, and an iron bridge 
is now being erected. 

Bridges over the Fitchburg Railroad. 

PROSPECT-STREET BRIDGE. 

The bridge is in good condition. The northerly abutment is in 
worse condition than in 1891. It should be rebuilt this year. 

WASHINGTON— STREET BRIDGE. 

This bridge is in good condition. 

BEACON-STREET BRIDGE. 

The bridge appears to be in good condition. The southwesterly 
abutment shows signs of movement, but is probably safe. 

Miscellaneous Bridges. 

BROADWAY BRIDGE OVER ALEWIFE BROOK. 

The retaining walls need pointing and are considerably worse 
than in 1891. The arch appears to be in good condition, except that 
the surface water finds its way through the arch ring. This should 
be prevented by collecting the surface water by a catch-basin. 

BOSTON-AVENUE BRIDGE. 

The fences were rebuilt in 1892 and the floor replanked. The 
bridge is in good condition. 

MIDDLESEX-AVENUE BRIDGE. 

The sidewalk planking on the Somerville side should be repaired. 
The fence rails are badly decayed and ought to be repaired this sea- 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 393 

son. The planking on the easterly pier head should be relaid with 
new plank. 

The faces of the channel way should be replanked, and new cross 
t)racing on the pier is needed. 

PERAMBULATION OF THE MEDFORD LINE. 

A committee of the City Council, consisting of Alderman Newell 
F. Caswell and Councilman John Andrews, representing Alderman Wil- 
liam L. Barber, the city engineer, and superintendent of streets, in com- 
pany with a similar committee from the town of Medford, met at the 
Mystic water works pumping station, October 20th, 1892, and peram- 
bulated the boundary line between Somerville and Medford, ex- 
amined ail the bounds and found them all substantially in good 
condition. 

PUBLIC GROUNDS. 

The work done on the public grounds comprises a considerable 
amount of improvement, particularly on Central Hill and at Nathan 
Tufts Park. 

The appropriation for the public grounds department for 1892 
was $5,700. The cost of the work which the committee voted to 
do was so large that by the first of July the appropriation was 
exhausted, and as the additional appropriation could not be obtained, 
it became necessary to discharge all the men employed, and for this 
reason no work was done on the public grounds after July 1st. 

The work of the public grounds department in the line of im- 
provements was as follows:-— 

On Central Hill, grading and seeding the Medford-street slope. 
In 1890 the entire northerly slope of the hill was graded and covered 
with loam, and the area south of the walk leading through the park 
from the railroad grounds to the corner of Walnut and Medford 
streets was seeded. The area north of this walk extending to Med- 
ford street was not seeded, because the appropriation had been 
expended when the ground had been covered with loam. As the 
appropriation of 1891 was not sufficient to provide for the work of 
seeding, the ground was allowed to grow to weeds, and in 1892, 



394 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

when it was finally seeded, the entire area had to be ploughed and 
regraded. 

If fifty dollars had been expended in seeding in 1890, the amount 
expended in 1892 could have been saved. The items of expenditure 
will be found on page 401. 

GRADING AND SEEDING NORTH OF THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

When the new Winter Hill station was erected a considerable 
portion of the hill was graded back from the slope, retaining walls 
were built, and the hill sodded for a considerable distance from the 
depot grounds. The surface of the hill, between the depot grounds and 
the walk leading northerly from the high school to School street, was 
uneven with very little grass on it. 

During the year this area was ploughed, graded, covered with 
loam, seeded and trees were set out. The cost of this work was 
$1,550.59. 

GRADING SCHOOL-STREET SLOPE. 

For many years this part of Central Hill has been very unsightly. 
School street was graded considerably below the public grounds, and 
only an earth slope, without loam or grass, was left. The surface 
and ground water washed over the sidewalk and often burst through 
the brick sidewalk, so that it was almost impassable in winter from 
ice, and almost impossible to maintain the brick sidewalk in the 
spring. 

A catch-basin was constructed on the citv land near the School- 
street entrance, and a blind drain was laid parallel and close to the 
sidewalk. This drain was dug four feet deep and filled with three 
feet of stone and is connected with the catch-basin in School street. 

The earth slope has been graded and made to more nearly con- 
form to the contour of the hill. It has been covered with loam twelve 
inches deep and seeded. The total cost was $399.80. 

NATHAN TUFTS PARK. 

As the gift to the city of Somerville of the Old Powder House 
and surrounding ground is of considerable importance, and as there 
are some facts of a historic nature which will be of value if recorded 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 395 

for future reference, the following abstract of the papers and proceed- 
ings of the City Council and a short account of some items of history 
connected with the Old Powder House which I have been able to col- 
lect, are herewith submitted. 

A communication was presented to the City Council December 
10, 1890, from the heirs of Nathan Tufts, which contained a proposi- 
tion whereby they agreed to convey to the city of Somerville the Old 
Powder House and surrounding grounds, under certain conditions. 
By an order adopted by the City Council January 3d, 1891, and 
approved by the mayor January 5th, 1891, the gift of the Old Powder 
House and adjacent land was accepted upon the condition expressed 
in the communication submitted from the Tufts heirs to the City 
Council December 11, 1890. 

March 6, 1891, an order was introduced in the Common Council 
requesting the committee on public grounds to consider the expedi- 
ency of acquiring additional land adjoining the proposed park. After 
some consideration, the committee on public grounds addressed a 
communication to the heirs of Nathan Tufts, dated April 11, 1892, 
which expressed a desire to acquire more land than was donated by 
the original gift, and submitted for their consideration certain modi- 
fications of the original proposition, which are quoted from the com- 
munication of April 11 as follows: — 

1. " That you will give to the city of Somerville the Powder 
House building and about 68,400 feet of land surrounding it, as con- 
templated in your offer of December 10, 1890, upon the following 
conditions." 

2. "That the Powder House be kept perpetually in repair, and 
that the land surrounding it, included in the said gift, be made into 
a public park and forever maintained as such, to be called the 
* Nathan Tufts Park.'" 

3. " That the city will lay out and construct the carriageways 
and footways, which are laid down and indicated on the plan sub- 
mitted herewith, made by the city engineer, and dated April 11, 1892, 
and which are within the broad blue line, as shown on said plan, in- 
dicating the boundary line of the park property." 

4. "That the abutters on said carriageways shall have the right 
to pass and re-pass over the same." 

5. " That no assessment for betterments on account of the park 
shall be levied upon the owners of the so-called Powder House farm." 



396 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

6. " That the work of constructing the carriageways and foot- 
ways in said park property shall be commenced within three months 
from the delivery of the deeds of such property to the city, unless the 
deeds shall be delivered at so late a date that work cannot be pro- 
ceeded with before the frost sets in, and in that case, within three 
months from the time when the frost shall be out of the ground ; and 
that 'Liberty avenue,' as shown on said plan of April 11, 1892, shall 
be constructed within the limits of said park property within one 
year from said delivery of the deeds, and all carriageways and foot- 
ways within said park property shall be constructed within two ye^rs 
from said delivery of the deeds." 

7. " The deed of land donated by you, as referred to in Clause 
1, is to contain the above conditions." 

8. "That you will give to the city a deed of the remainder of 
the land included within the broad blue line, as shown on said plan 
of April 11, the city paying you for such remainder the sum of fifteen 
(15) cents per foot; that is to say, you are to receive fifteen cents per 
foot for the land within said park property, except that portion and 
quantity which is to be donated by you as aforesaid ; the land included 
within the area of Liberty avenue within the broad blue lines, as 
shown upon the plan, not to be reckoned as part of the land to be 
paid for, since it is to be maintained as a street, as shown on said 
plan." 

This proposition, above referred to and quoted from, was accepted 
by the Tufts heirs by a letter dated May 7, 1892, and on May 11 
this proposition was submitted to the City Council, and an order was 
passed by both branches of the City Council, by which the city rati- 
fied said proposition, accepted the donation of certain lands upon the 
terms and conditions as stated, and authorized the committee on pub- 
lic grounds to accept and receive in behalf of the city a deed or deeds 
of the lands to be donated and a deed or deeds of the lands to be 
purchased, and authorized the city treasurer to borrow therefor the 
sum stipulated. 

The area donated amounted to 68,357 square feet, and the area 
purchased to 129,497 square feet. The order above referred to 
further appropriated the sum of $25,000 for the purchase and im- 
provement of said lands and the construction of said park in accord- 
ance with said communication and said plan of the city engineer. 

The deed of land donated was signed May 28, and recorded at 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 397 

the Middlesex Registry of Deeds, June 6, 1892, in libro 2,119, 
folio 524. 

The deed of land purchased was signed and recorded at the 
same time and place in libro 2,119, folio 521. 

The above deeds were signed by Francis Tufts, Sarah E. Kidder, 
Martha B. Tufts, Hannah J. Allen, Mary Alice Tufts, Albert C. Tufts, 
Nathan F. Tufts, and Fannie S. Tufts. 

A certificate of performance of the conditions under these deeds 
was recorded at the Middlesex Registry of Deeds, March 7, 1893, 
libro 2,180, folio 493. 

HISTORICAL TABLET. 

June 28, 1892, a petition was received from the Massachusetts 
Society of the Sons of the Revolution for the privilege of erecting a 
bronze tablet, suitably inscribed, upon the Old Powder House, the 
tablet to become the property of the city of Somerville. July 14, 
1892, an order granting the petition upon the conditions expressed 
therein was approved by the mayor. 

December 14, 1892, a communication was received from the 
above-mentioned society formally presenting to the city of Somer- 
ville the bronze tablet which had been placed upon the Old Powder 
House. The City Council, by an order dated December 14 and 
approved by the mayor December 16, accepted the gift of the bronze 
tablet, and heartily concurred in the following sentiment expressed 
by the society in its letter of presentation : " That the tablet may 
serve to remind the present generation and the generations which 
shall follow of the patriotic deeds of our heroic forefathers." 

The following is a copy of the inscription of the bronze tablet 
placed upon the Old Powder House by the Massachusetts Society of 
the Sons of the Revolution, and presented to the city of Somerville : — ■ 

This old Mill, 
Built by John Mallet on a site purchased in 
1703-4, was deeded in 1747 to the province of 
the Massachusetts Bay in New England, 
and for many years was used as a public 

Powder House. 
On Sept. 1st, 1774, General Gage seized 
the 250 half-barrels of gunpowder 
stored within it and thereby provoked the 



398 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Great Assembly of the following day on 

Cambridge Common 
The first occasion on which our patriotic 
forefathers met in arms to oppose the 
Tyranny of King George III ; in 1775 it 
became the magazine of the 
American Army Besieging Boston. 

This tablet was placed by the 
Massachusetts Society of 
Sons of the Revolution, 
Sept. 1, 1892. 



CONSTRUCTION OF DRIVEWAYS. 

Early in the season specifications and contracts were prepared 
for grading the roads and walks shown on the plan adopted by the 
City Council. July 30, 1892, a contract was signed with Christopher 
Burke, and work was begun immediately thereafter. The work done 
under this contract is as follows : Between the lines of the slopes of 
all the roads, the loam has been stripped and deposited in piles con- 
venient for use in grading slopes. Liberty avenue has been con- 
structed to sub-grade. The road leading northeasterly from Powder 
House terrace and located on the southeasterly side of the Powder 
House has been sub-graded to the entrance at Elm street. The 
stone culled from the earth and rock excavation has been deposited 
in piles convenient for use on the roads. 

The cost of work done under the contract to date is $2,640.97. 

In addition to the work done by contract, the following has been 
done by day labor: The stone walls formerly located within the 
limits of the park have been removed and the stone deposited in con- 
venient piles for use on the roads. The ruins of the Emerson pickle 
factory buildings have been removed, the site cleaned and the cellar 
partly filled. All unsightly trees have been cut down. The face of 
the rock bluff has been cleaned from the wild growth of bushes, 
weeds, etc. Considerable quantities of stone have been collected 
about the grounds and deposited in piles. Excavations have been 
made along the top of the rock bluff to determine its character and 
profile as a study for the proposed parapet wall. The cost of the 
work done by the day has been $505.08. 

The amount expended to December 31, 1892, less amount re- 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



399 



ceived from the sale of dwelling-house and old materials, has been 

$21,620.95. 

Items of expenditure, Nathan Tufts Park: — 

Land . . . . . ... 

Labor ....... 

Printing specifications, contract for grading 
Christopher Burke, payments on contract and extra 

work 
Lumber 
Stakes 

Repairs on Powder House 
Sign and lettering 
Advertising sale of building and auction 



BROADWAY PARKWAY. 



119,424 


55 


142 


58 


6 


80 


2,167 


12 


4 


63 


8 


60 


4 


17 


3 


50 


19 


50 


$21,781 


45 



The construction of the parkway in Broadway, between Arthur 
street and Marshall street, has been completed. In November and 
December, 1891, the location of the street railway tracks was changed 
from the northeasterly side of the roadway to the centre, and the grades 
of the tracks were adjusted to the grade of the proposed parkway in 
such a manner as to allow a crown of one-half inch to the foot in the 
roadway from gutter to parkway curbing, and a slight grade from 
curbing to railway tracks. Iron poles were placed in the centre of 
the space between the tracks, and on the poles cross arms were placed, 
from which the trolley wires were hung. 

Early in the spring curbing was placed on the outside lines of 
the parkway, leaving a roadway forty-three feet wide on the north- 
easterly side, with a width varying from forty-two to forty-four feet 
on the southwesterly side. The surface of the old roadway included 
within the lines of the curbingwas broken up and removed to a depth 
of eighteen inches below the grade of the tracks ; and as this depth 
of excavation did not remove all the ballast used in the old roadway, 
a layer of street sweepings six inches thick was spread over the bot- 
tom of the excavation to prevent the loam and water from leeching 
through the underlying ballast. Twelve inches in depth of loam was 
used to surface the parkway to the grade of the curbing, and enough 



400 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



more added to grade to the railway tracks. A sod border was laid 
inside the curbing and outside the rails of the tracks, and the balance 
of the area within the parkway seeded, except the area between the 
rails of the tracks, which still remains in the same condition as in 
November, 1891 (which is to be graded and maintained by the 
street railway company). The West End Street Railway Company 
has agreed to complete the grading and seeding of this area early in 
the coming season. 

A line of maple trees was set out parallel with each line of curb- 
ing. The macadam and ballast excavated from the surface of the old 
street was used to macadamize Middlesex avenue, but no credit was 
allowed the parkway appropriation for the material taken from the 
limits of the parkway. 

The area improved included within the lines of the curbing is 
61,688 square feet. The area between the outer rails of street 
railway tracks is 22,760 linear feet. 

The area which the city is obliged to maintain is 38,928 feet; 
the street railway company, 22,760 feet. 

MATERIALS USED. 



2,258.8 linear feet of curbing 

5,992.6 cubic yards loam delivered 

9,471 square feet sod borders delivered 

12 granite posts delivered 

67 maple trees delivered 

1 catch-basin constructed 

Temporary wire fence 

Lime and cement 

Fertilizer 

Grass seed . 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Total cost 
Less cost of loam used between tracks paid for by 
West End Street Railway Co. 

Net cost of parkway 



11,053 41 


2,774 93 


284 


13 


90 


00 


67 


00 


67 


17 


27 


23 


3 


90 


25 


00 


16 


00 


977 


50 


154 


90 


15,541 17 

17 


Y 

247 


95 


$5,293 


22 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 401 

CITY HALL AND LIBRARY GROUNDS. 

Maintenance. 



Labor, care of walks and grass to July 1, $156 45 

Plants ....... 10 00 

Repairs of water pipe, library basement, 1 50 



IMPROVEMENTS. 



$167 95 



HIGH SCHOOL GROUNDS. 

Maintenance. 
X,abor, care of walks and grass to July 1 . . . 65 63 



CENTRAL HILL. 








Maintenance. 








Labor, care of walks and grass 


$648 09 




Sod . . 


26 


00 




Repairing and painting settees 


12 77 




Painting guns ..... 


10 


70 




Pointing battery wall .... 


5 


65 




Building temporary wire fences . 


77 


60 




Tools and property .... 


67 


95 


• 


Repairing tools, oil, and express charges, 


40 


38 




Plants 


20 


00 




Electric lighting to December 31, 1892, 


75 


90 




Street watering 


19 


25 




Police service . . 


37 


50 


1,041 79 
205 97 


Sidewalk assessment, Medford street . 







EuiJding toolhouse (rear of City Hall) . . . 165 54 

Grading and seeding Medford-street slope, Wal- 
nut street northwesterly to railroad grounds: — 

Labor and teaming . . . . $249 28 



Amounts carried forward . . $249 28 $1,646 88 



402 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
Loam . 

Dressing . . . . . 
Grass seed . . . 



$249 28 

94 70 

152 07 

32 00 



Grading and seeding northwest of High School 
walk to School street: — 



$85 60 

920 56 

146 20 

33 50 

24 48 

241 15 

26 00 

51 50 

16 60 



Sod . 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Filling 
Loam . 
Dressing 
Grass seed 
Trees . 
Lime . 



Grading School-street slope : 

Labor . 
Teaming 
Loam . 
Dressing 
Grass seed 
Sod . 
Catch-basin 
Trees . 



BROADWAY PARK. 

Maintenance to July 1, 1892. 

Labor, care of walks and grass . . $666 11 

Trimming trees and shrubs . 

Horse hire, grain and hay 

Electric lighting to December 31, 1892, 

Police service ..... 

Raising and lowering flagstaff 

Plants . . . . . . . 

Amounts carried forward . 



$196 95 


20 


75 


77 


36 


18 


75 


8 


00 


19 


00 


58 


99 


5 


00 



51 


75 


61 


48 


224 40 


27 


50 


25 


00 


60 


00 


$1,116 24 



$1,646 8S 



528 05 



1,545 5^ 



404 80 



$4,125 32 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



403 



Amounts brought forward 
Tools and repairs of same 
Oil and painting seats . 
Trees .... 
Loam .... 
Street watering 
Repairing flagstaff topmast 

-Repairing toolhouse 



BROADWAY PARKWAY 



X.abor . 
Lumber 



$1,116 24 


$4,125 32 


120 71 




5 83 




18 75 




9 75 




51 76 




4 95 






1,327 99 




. 


25 11 


A.Y. 

$10 87 




2 55 


l.q 4.9. 



SOMERVILLE-AVENUE CEMETERY. 



Repairing fence 



4 64 



MEMORIAL TABLETS. 

Painting letters on stone tablets erected in 1891 



16 50 



SOMERVILLE LIGHT INFANTRY DRILL FIELD. 

Work done on the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation grounds on Washington street, and charged 
to public grounds account, on condition that com- 
pany be allowed to use the grounds for a driH field : — 

Labor and teaming . . . .... 



150 00 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Carriage hire 



10 00 



CHARLES G. POPE SCHOOL. 

Work done and materials furnished in grading the 
Charles G. Pope School grounds, charged to 
schoolhouse incidentals account 

Cost of work done by public grounds depart- 
ment 



567 12 



$6,240 10 



404 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



WATER WORKS. 

Lines and grades for laying water pipes have been given, and all 
mains and services have been located and recorded. 

The high-service system still remains practically in the same condi- 
tion as in 1890. The extensions recommended in the report of the 
special committee of the City Council have not been made. The twelve- 
inch main on Highland avenue and the ten-inch main on Summer 
street should be laid this year, as both these lines are wrought-iron,. 
cement-lined pipe, and cannot be depended upon for excessive 
service if a large supply of water should be demanded for fire pur- 
poses. 

In the report of the city engineer for the year 1891 it was 
recommended that a second tank was needed on Winter Hill, and a 
reserve boiler at the pumping station. No action has been taken on 
either of these recommendations. The necessity of making these 
additions to the high-service system is more urgent than last year. 

Should it be necessary at any time to stop pumping on account 
of some accident to pump or boiler, or some defect in the force main,, 
the capacity of the tank would be sufficient for only a limited time, 
and, in such an emergency it would be necessary to use the low- 
service pressure. 

It would be very hazardous to adopt this pressure, for the large 
number of houses now built on the high lands would be without a 
water supply, except possibly during a few hours at night, and in 
case of fire no water could be obtained. 

It would not be advisable at any time to pump directly into 
the mains because of the large proportion of cement-lined pipe in 
use. 

It will soon be a matter of economy to erect a second tank to 
avoid the more costly expedient of running the high-service engine 
on a continuous service in order to supply the increased consumption 
due to the great increase in population. A continuous service would 
increase the liability to accident in the pumping plant, and add to 
the pumping station's expenses for fuel and salaries. 

Land available for the location of a tank on Winter Hill will 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 405 

soon be occupied, and can then only be obtained at a much larger 
cost than now. 

Immediate action should be taken by the City Council in the 
matter of the purchase of land. 

A second boiler is needed at the pumping station for use in 
emergencies such as niight occur if the old boiler should need repairs. 
It is also needed as a reserve when it may be necessary to clean or 
inspect the old boiler. 

The twelve-inch low-service main laid in Somerville avenue from 
East Cambridge line northwesterly to Central street is part of the 
system recommended in 1891. It is unfortunate that a second 
twelve-inch main connected with the high-service supply was not laid 
at the same time. It will be needed within a few years, and it would 
have been a more economical method to have laid both mains at the 
same time. It would not then have been necessary to disturb the 
granite pavement laid during the past year. 

The twenty-inch main recommended and laid in 1891 in Wash- 
ington street, from Tufts street to Medford street, was not extended 
in 1892. It should be laid through Tufts and Cross streets, and be 
connected with the thirty-inch supply main before any further exten- 
sions are made in a northwesterly direction, 

A twelve-inch main was laid in Somerville avenue from the East 
Cambridge line to Central street, except that a portion of the main 
between Medford and Mansfield streets is sixteen inches in diameter. 
A fourteen-inch main was laid across Somerville avenue at Medford 
street to connect with the fourteen-inch main in Medford street laid 
in 1891. This twelve-inch main was laid to replace an eight-inch 
main cement-lined, wrought-iron pipe. 

The eight-inch cement-lined pipe on Dane street was relaid with 
twelve-inch iron, from Somerville avenue to Washington street. 

The eight-i-nch cement-lined on Medford street was relaid with 
twelve-inch iron, from Somerville avenue to Highland avenue. 

The six-inch cement-lined on Prospect street was replaced with 
sixteen-inch iron, from Washington street to Newton street. 

The four-inch cement-lined on Summer street was relaid with ten- 
inch iron, from Bow street to School street. 

The eight-inch cement-lined on Washington street was relaid with 
twelve-inch iron, from Myrtle street to the Boston line ; and from 
Dane street to Beacon street was relaid with ten-inch. 



406 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

These are the more important mains relaid during the year. A 
large amount of eight and six inch pipe was relaid, which is given in 
full in the report of the superintendent of the water works. 

The extensions have been made with six and eight inch pipes. 
The locations of these extensions are given in full in the superin- 
tendent's report. 

HORACE L. EATON, 

City Engineer. 





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^ 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



411 



APPENDIX C. 

TABLE SHOWING LOCATION AND COST OF STREET IMPROVE- 
MENTS. 



Name of Street. 



Beacon ( Park St. to Kent St. ) . . 

Bond ( Broadway to Jaques St. ) . . 

Broadway ( Cross St. to Marshall St.) 

Central (Broadway to Medford St.) 

Cross ( Pearl St. to Medford St.) 

Davis Sq 

Day 

Francesca Ave 

Greene 

Grove ( Arlington branch railroad to 
Morrison St.) 

Linwood 

Mason Ave 

Medford ( Somerville Ave. to Fitch- 
burg Railroad ) 

Middlesex Ave 

Moore 

Pleasant Ave 

Richdale Ave 

Sycamore ( Broadway to Medford St.) 

Tennyson ( Medford St. to Forster 
St.) 

Thurston ( Medford St. to Richdale 
Ave.) 

Winslow Ave. ( Villa Ave. to Grove 
St.) 

Totals 



Gravel. 



Sq. Yds. Cost 



2,100 

500 
1,720 

2,230 

820 



7,370 



$502 40 

86 25 
1,408 80 

432 00 
176 40 



},605 85 



Macadam. 



Sq. Yds. 



3,500 
1,500 
20,600 
2,880 
2,600 
1,530 
2,090 

1,420 

1,100 

6,830 



12,000 
1,940 
1,100 



1,200 



640 



60,9S0 



Cost. 



$857 50> 
346 00 

5,272 20 
800 30 
449 20 
387 50 
457 70 

396 60 

333 50 
2,507 60 



1,885 10 
825 46 

278 70 

560 50 
814 90 



206 95 



$16,379 71 



412 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



APPENDIX D. 

STREETS ACCEPTED IN 1892. 



Name of Street. 



Crocker 
Essex . 
Francesca Ave. 
Greene . . 
Grove . . . 
Heath . . . 
Hudson . . 
Partridge Ave. 
Stone Ave. 
Summit 
Winslow Ave. 



From. 



Highland Ave. . . 
Medford St. . . . 

Elm St 

Summer St. . 
Arlington Br'ch R.R. 
Temple St. . . . 
Central St. . . . 
Broadway 
Union Sq. 

Elm St 

Elm St 



To. 



Crown St. 
Richdale Ave 
Liberty Ave, 
Laurel St. 
Morrison St. 
Bond St. . 
Lowell St. 
Vernon St. 
Columbus Ave 
Billingham St 
Grove St. . 



Width in 
Feet. 



40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
45 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 



Length in 
Feet. 



528 

232 

762 

555 

325 

1,043 

1,368 

1,457 

676 

262 

514 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



413 



APPENDIX E. 

TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION, LENGTH, AND WIDTH OF PUBLIC AND 

PRIVATE STREETS. 













Length 








Public 


Width 






Street. 


From. 


To. 


or 


in 
















Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


Adams .... 


Broadway . . . 


Medford St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


900 




Adrian .... 


Marion St. . . 


Joseph St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


530 


Albion .... 


Central St. . . 


Cedar St. ... 


Private. 


about 35 


- 


2,740 


Albion .... 


Broadway . . . 


Medford Line . . 


Private. 


50 


- 


100 


Aldersey . . . 


V/alnut St. . . 


Vinal Ave. . . . 


Public. 


40 


508 


- 


Aldrich .... 


Pearl St. . . . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Public. 


40 


611 


- 


Alfred .... 


Broadway . . . 


Medford Line . . 


Private. 


50 


- 


50 


Allen .... 


Somerville Ave. . 


Charlestown St. 


Private. 


25 


- 


680 


Allen Ct. . . . 


Park St. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 


- 


150 


Alpine .... 


Cedar St. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


30 • 


- 


670 


Alston .... 


Cross St . . . 


Shawmut PI. . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


420 


Ames .... 


Bartlett St. . . 


Robinson St. . . 


Pubhc. 


40 


580 


- 


Appleton . . . 


Willow Ave. . . 


Clifton St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


510 


- 


Appleton . . . 


Chfton St. . . 


Liberty Ave. . . 


Private. 


4) 


- 


120 


Arlington . . . 


Franklin St. . . 


Lincoln St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


440 


- 


Arnold Ct. . . . 


Beacon St. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


10 


- 


115 


Arthur Ct. . . . 


Linden St. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


about 10 


- 


100 


Arthur .... 


Broadway . . . 


Bonair St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


4C8 


- 


Ashland .... 


Summer St. . . 


Sartwell Ave. . . 


Private. 


30 


- 


470 


Asylum Ave. . . 


Washington St. . 


McLean Asylum . 


Private. 


about 30 


- 


2 000 


Atherton . . . 


Central St. . . 


Beech St. ... 


Private. 


40 


- 


264 


Auburn Ave. . . 


Cross St. . . . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


30 


- 


600 


Austin .... 


Broadway . . . 


Mystic- Ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


680 


- 


Autumn .... 


Broadway . . . 


Bonair St. . . . 


Private. 


20 


- 


420 


Avon 


School St. . . 


Central St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


1,360 


Avon PI. ... 


Cross St. . . . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


25 


- 


150 


Ayer Ave. . . . 


Morrison Ave. . 


Boston Ave. . . 


Private. 


70 


- 


1,500 


Banks .... 


Elm St. . . . 


Summer St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


_ 


639 


Bartlett .... 


Vernon St. . . 


Broadway 


Private. 


40 


- 


1,550 


Bartlett .... 


Washington St. . 


Asylum t Grounds . 


Private. 


20 


- 


200 


*Bay State Are. . 


Broadway . . 


Fosket St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


1,197 


Beach Ave. . . 


Webster Ave. . 


Columbia St. . . 


Private. 


about 20 


- 


200 


Beacon PI. . . . 


Beacon St. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


15 


- 


200 


Beacon .... 


Cambridge Line. 


Somerville Ave. . 


Public. 


66 


6,100 


- 


Bean's Ct. . . . 


Cutter St. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


16 


- 


100 


Bedford . . . 


South St. . . . 


Cambridge Line . 


Private. 


30 


- 


160 


Beech .... 


Somerville Ave. . 


Spring St. . . . 


Public. 


4f) 


800 


- 


Belmont . . . 


Somerville Ave. . 


Highland Ave. 


Public. 


40 


2,175 


- 


Belmont PI. . . 


Belmont St. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


25 


- 


175 


Benedict Ave. 


Broadway . . . 


Benedict St . . . 


Private. 


20 


- 


200 


Benedict . . . 


Union St. , . . 


Austin St . . . 


Public. 


40 


600 


- 


Bennett Ct. . . 


Bennett St. . . 


Prospect St. . . 


Private. 


10 


- 


100 


Bennett .... 


Prospect St. . . 


Bennett Ct. . . . 


Private. 


25&40 


- 


400 


Benton Ave. . . 


Summer St. . . 


Hudson St. . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


1,210 


Berkeley . . . 


School St. . . . 


Central St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,360 


- 


Berwick .... 


Lawrence St. 


Northwesterly . 


Private. 


20 


- 


170 


Bigelow .... 


Boston St. . . 


High St 


Private. 


50 


- 


2(13 


Billingham . . . 


Broadway . . . 


William St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


568 


Bishop's PI. . . 


Glen St. . . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


10 


- 


75 


Blakeley Ave. . . 


Winthrop Ave. . 


Cross St. ... 


Private. 


40 


- 


630 


Eleachery Ct. . . 


Somerville Ave. . 


Fitchburg R. R. . 


Private. 


30 


- 


450 


Bolton .... 


Oak St. ... 


Houghton St. , 


Private. 


40 


- 


5U0 


Bonair . . . 


Cross St. . . . 


Walnut St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,470 


- 


Bond ..... 


Broadway . . . 


Jaques St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


640 


- 


Bonner Ave. . . 


Washington St. . 


Columbus Ave. 


Pubhc. 


40 


450 


- 


Boston Ave. . . 


Medford Line . 


Mystic River . . 


Public. 


60 


910 


~ 



Proposed 



414 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Street. 



From. 



To. 



Public 

or 
Private. 



Width 

in 
Feet. 



Length. 



Public. 



Private. 



*Boston Ave. . 
Boston . . . 
Bow .... 
Bowdoin . . 
Bow St. PI. . 
Bradford Ave. 
Bradley . . . 
Brastow Ave. . 
Broadway . . 
Broadway PI. . 
Brook . . . 
Brook . . . 
Browning Road 
Buckingham . 
Burnside Ave. 

Caldwell PI. . 
Calvin . . . 
Cambria . . 
Cameron Ave. 
Campbell Pk. 
Campbell Pk. 
Campbell Pk. PI. 
Carlton . . 
Carver . . 
Cedar . . 
Cedar Ave. 
Cedar St. PI. , 
Central . . , 
Centre . . , 
Chandler . . 
Chapel . . . 
Chapel Ct. 
Charles . . . 
Charlestown . 
Charnwood Road 
Chauncey Ave. 
■*Chelsea . . 
Cherry . , . 
Chester . . . 
Chester Ave. . 
Chester Ave. . 
Chester PL . 
Chestnut . . 
Church . . . 
Church St. PI. 
Claremon . , 
Clarendon Ave 
Clark . . . 
Clifton . . . 
Clifton . . . 
Clyde . . . 
College Ave. . 
Columbia . . 
Columbia Ct. . 
Columbus Ave 
Columbus Ct. 
Concord Ave . 
Concord Ave. 
Congress PI. . 
Conlon Ct. . . 
Conwell . . 
Conwell Ave. 



Cedar St. . . 
Washington St. 
Union Sq. 
Was^hington St. 
Bow St. . . 
School St. 
Pearl St. . . 
Lowell St 
Charlest'n Line 
Broadway 
Glen St. . . 
Dover St. 
Sycamore St. 
Beacon St. . 
Elm St. . . 

Washington St 
Washington St. 
Central St. . 
Holland St. . 
Meacham St. 
Kingston St. 
Campbell Pk. 
Somerville Ave 
Porter St. . . 
Elm St. . . 
Cedar St. . . 
Murdock St. . 
Somerville Ave 
Albion St. . 
Park Ave. 
Elm St. . . 
Sycamore St. 
Washington St. 
Merriam St. . 
Willow Ave. . 
Broadway 
Mystic Ave. . 
Elm St. . . 
Elm St. . . 
MedfordSt. . 
Angle . . . 
Chester St. . 
Poplar St. . 
Summer St. . 
Church St. 
Holland St. . 
Broadway . . 
Newton St. . 
Appleton St. . 
Morrison St. . 
Cedar St. . . 
Broadway . . 
Glass House Ct 
Columbia St. 
Land of Clark 
Washington St. 
Prospect St. . 
Leon St. . . 
Linwood St. . 
Columbia St. 
Highland Ave. 
Curtis St. . . 



Medford Line 
Walnut St. . 
Somerville Ave 
Southerly 
Northwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Walter St. . 
Porter St. . 
Arlington Line 
Southwesterly 
Cross St. 
Northerly 
Central St. . 
Dimick St. . 
Summer St. . 

Southerly 
Beacon St. . 
Benton Ave. 
Cambridge Line 
Northerly 
Westerly . 
Arlington Br. R 
Lake St. . . 
Northwesterly 
Broadway 
Linden Ave. 
Southwesterly 
Broadway 
B. & L. R. R. 
Broadway 
Chandler Ct. 
Northwesterly 
Ayslum Grounds 
Allen St. . . 
Gordonia Road 
Mystic Ave. 
Melrose St. . 
Highland Ave. 
Cambridge Line 
Angle . . . 
Cross St. . . 
Northwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Lake St. . . 
Northwesterly 
Cambridge Line 
Cambridge Line 
Northwesterly 
Morrison St. 
Arlington Br. R 
Murdock St. 
Medford Line 
Cambridge Line 
Webster Ave. 
Walnut St. . 
Northerly . 
Leon St. . . 
Beacon St. . 
Southwesterly 
Easterly . 
Southwesterly 
Westerly . . 



Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Pubhc. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

PubUc. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 



50 




40&45 


1,880 


60 to 50 


1,100 


40 


_ 


40 


- 


40 


_ 


40 


. 


40 


686 


60 to 200 


17,000 


22 


_ 


40 


500 


40 


_ 


40 


- 


40 


300 


40 


- 


20 


_ 


30 & 40 


- 


40 


- 


60 


- 


40 


- 


40 


_ 


20 


_ 


40 


300 


40 


- 


40 


4,150 


22 




20 


- 


33, 40, 45 


4,700 


35 


- 


40 


1,232 


40 


273 


12 


_ 


30 


- 


15 


- 


40 


- 


50 


1,320 


50 


- 


45 


1,450 


40 


850 


about 22 


220 


20 


- 


40 


_ 


40 


- 


40 


900 


25 


- 


40 


_ 


40 


_ 


35 


_ 


40 


240 


40 


- 


30 


- 


50 


1,700 


40 


- 


9 


- 


40 


1,000 


30 


- 


40 


1,500 


30&40 


- 


16 


_ 


20 


- 


35 


- 


40 


— 



1,200' 



370 
300 
150 
765. 



250 

200 
679 

720' 

210 
644 
488. 
1,000 
520 
500 
84 

156 

290 
220 

200 



130 

200 
440 

588 

1,390 



445 
200 
540 

170 

560 

1,210 

450 

220 
600 

550 
150 

100 

470 

200 
200 
360 
600 



* Proposed. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



415 













LeN'^th 








Public 


Width 






Street. 


From. 


To. 




• 






or 
Private. 


111 

Feet. 
















Public 


Private. 


Cook 


Marion St. . . 


West So.Wyatt St. 


Private. 


40 




450 


Cooney .... 


Beacon St. . . 


Line St 


Private. 


26 


- 


220 


Cottage Ave . . 


Russell St. . . 


Chester St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


500 


- 


Cottage PI. . . 


Washington St. . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


about 11 


- 


150 


Craigie .... 


Somerville Ave. 


Summer St. . . . 


Public. 


60 


1,250 


- 


Crescent . . . 


Washington St. . 


Pearl St 


i^rivate. 


30 to 38 


- 


650 


Crocker .... 


Highland Ave. . 


Crown St. 


Public. 


40 


r>2^ 


- 


Cross .... 


Mystic Ave. . . 


Medford St. . . 


Public. 


40&45 


3,750 


_ 


Crown .... 


Porter St. . . 


Lowell St. . . . 


Private. 


30 


- 


700 


Curtis .... 


Broadway . . 


Medford Line . . 


Public. 


40 


2,300 


- 


Cutler .... 


Lawrence St. 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 


- 


170 


Cutter .... 


Broadway . . 


Webster St. . . 


Public. 


40 


740 


- 


Cutter Ave. . . 


Summer St. . 


Highland Ave. 


Private. 


40 


- 


450 


Cypress .... 


Central St. . . 


Beech St. ... 


Private. 


40 


- 


262 


Dana 


Bonair St. . . 


Pearl St 


Public. 


40 


690 


_ 


Dane 


Somerville Ave. 


Washington St. 


Public. 


40 


1,270 


- 


Dane Ct. . . . 


Dane St. . . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


30 


- 


600 


Dartmouth . . 


Medford St. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,450 


- 


Day 


Elm St. . . . 


Cambridge Line . 


Public. 


40 


94 J 


- 


*Dean Ave. . . 


Morrison Ave. . 


Boston Ave. . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


1,145 


Delaware . . . 


Aldrich St. . . 


Pearl St. ... 


Private. 


40 


- 


450 


Dell 


Glen St. . . . 


Tufts St. ... 


Private. 


40 


- 


465 


Derby .... 


Temple St. . . 


Wheatland St. . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


1,032 


Dexter .... 


Broadway . . 


Medford Line . . 


Private. 


50 


- 


25 


Dickinson . . . 


Springfield St. . 


Beacon St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


770 


_ 


Dimick .... 


Concord Ave. 


Calvin St. ... 


Private. 


40 


- 


860 


Distillhouse . . 


South St. . . . 


Cambridge Line . 


Private. 


35 


- 


150 


Dix PI 


Linwood St. . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


10 


- 


100 


Dover .... 


Elm St. . , . 


Cambridge Line . 


Public. 


40 


940 


- 


Dow 


North St. . . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


40 


- 


645 


*Downer PI. . . 


Downer St. . . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


20 


- 


125 


*Downer . . . 


Nashua St. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 


- 


120 


Durham .... 


Beacon St. . . 


Hanson St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


450 


Earle .... 


South St. . . . 


Fitchburg R. R. . 


Private. 


30 


_ 


500 


Eastman PL . . 


Highland Ave. . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


40 


"* 


300 


East Newton . . 


Prospect St. . . 


Webster Ave. . . 


Public. 


25 


470 


- 


*Edgeworth . . 


Mystic Ave. . . 


Melrose St. . . . 


Private. 


50 


- 


1,380 


Edmands . . . 


Broadway 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


440 


Eliot 


Vine St. . . . 


Park St 


Public. 


40 


260 


- 


Ellsworth . , . 


Cross St. . . . 


Rush St 


Public. 


40 


210 


- 


Elm Ct. ... 


Villa Ave. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


18 


- 


70 


Elm PI 


Harvard St. . . 


Easterly & west'ly 


Private. 


30 


- 


400 


Elm 


Somerville Ave. 


Medford Line . . 


Public. 


60+ 


7,700 


- 


Elmwood . . . 


Holland St. . . 


Cambridge Line . 


Private. 


40 


- 


970 


Elston .... 


Elm St. ... 


Summer St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


396 


- 


Emerson . . . 


Everett St. . . 


Newton St. . . . 


Private. 


30 


- 


170 


Emery .... 


Fitchburg R. R. 


South St. ... 


Private. 


30 


- 


530 


Endicott Ave. 


Broadway . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


800 


Essex .... 


Medford St. . . 


Richdale Ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


232 


- 


Everett .... 


Webster Ave. . 


Newton St. . . . 


Private. 


30 


- 


350 


Everett Ave. . . 


Cross St. . . . 


Dana St 


Public. 


40 


800 


- 


Evergreen Ave. . 


Marshall St. . . 


Sycamore St. . 


Public. 


40 


1,320 


- 


Evergreen Sq. 


Porter St. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


8 


- 


200 


Fairlee .... 


Cherry St. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


30 


_ 


150 


Fairmount Ave. . 


Curtis St. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


700 


Fanning Ave. . . 


Highland Ave. , 


Lexington Ave. 


Private. 


50 


• 


375 


Farragut Ave. 


Broadway 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


840 


Fenwick . . . 


Broadway . . 


Heath St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


340 


Fisk Ave. . . . 


Hinckley St. 


Lowell St. . . . 


Private. 


20&25 


- 


460 


Fitchburg Ct. . . 


Fitchburg St. . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


10 


~ 


225 



*Proposed. 



416 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Street. 



From. 



To. 



Public. 

or 
Private. 



Width 

in 
Feet. 



Length. 



Public. Private.- 



Fitchburg 
Fitchburg 
Flint Ave. 
Flint . . 
Florence 
Folger . 
Forest . 
Forster . 
*Fosket . 
Fountain Ave. 
Francesca Ave. 
Francis . . . 
Franklin Ave. 
Franklin Ct. . 
Franklin PI. . 
Franklin . . 
*Frederick Ave. 
Fremont . . 
Fremont Ave. 
Frost Ave. . . 

Garden Ct. 
Garfield Ave. . 
Garrison Ave. 
George . . . 
Gibbens . . 
Giles PI. . . 
Gill's Ct, . . 
Gilman . . . 
Gilrnan Terrace 
Glass House Ct. 
Glen .... 
*Gordonia Road 
Gorham . 
Gould Ave. 
Grand View Ave- 
Granite . 
Grant . . 
Greene . 
Greenville , 
Grove . , 

Hadley Ct. 
Hall . . 
Hall Ave. 
Hamlet . 
Hammond 
Hancock 
Hanson Ave. 
Hanson . 
Harding 
Harris . 
Harrison 
Harrison 
Harrison 
Harvard 
Harvard PI. 
Hathorn 
Hawkins 
Hawthorne 
Heath . 
Heath . 
Henderson 



Linwood St. . 
Linden St. 
Flint St. . . 
Franklin St. . 
Washington St. 
Broadway- 
Beacon St. 
Sycamore St. 
Willow Ave. 
Cross St. . . 
Elm St. . . 
Porter St. 
Washington St. 
Somerville Ave 
Franklin St. 
Broadway . 
Willow Ave 
Main St. . 
Parker St. 
Somerville Ave 



Ave 



Ave 



Somerville 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Central St. 
Walnut St. . 
Franklir St, . 
Cross St. . . 
Pearl St. . . 
Webster Ave. 
Broadway . . 
Summer St. . 
Holland St. . 
Porter St. 
WalnutSt. . 
Somerville 
Broadway . 
Summer St 
Medford St 
Elm St. . 



Franklin St. . 
Cedar St. . . 
Elm St. . . 
Highland Ave. 
Dickinson St. 
Elm St. . . 
Hanson St. . 
Washington St. 
South St. . . 
Beacon St. 
Ivaloo St. , . 
Mondamin Ct. 
Elmwood St. 
Summer St. . 
Harvard St. . 
Broadway . 
Somerville Ave 
Willow Ave. . 
Temple St. 
Bond St. . . 
Richardson St. 



B. & L. R. R. 

Easterly . . 
Northerly 
Aldrich St. . 
Perkins St. . 
Fairmount Ave 
Cambridge Line 
Central St. . 
Liberty Ave. 
Glen Sr. . . 
Liberty Ave. 
Conwell St. . 
Franklin St. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Southeasterly 
Washington St 
Cedar St. 
Northeasterly 
Easterly & west 
Dane St. . 



Fitchburg R. R. 
Mystic Ave. 
Southwesterly 
Lincoln Ave. 
Benton Ave. 
Northwesterly 
Westerly . . 
Walnut St. . 
Northeasterly 
Easterly . . 
Tufts St. . . 
Charnwood Road 
Howard St. . 
Southeasterly 
Vinal Ave. . 
Osgood St. . 
Mystic Ave. 
Laurel St. 
High St. . . 
Morrison St. 

Westerly . . 
Cherry St. 
Liberty Ave. 
Southwesterly 
Concord Ave. 
Summer St. . 
Easterly . . 
Vine St. . . 
Cambridge Line 
Cambridge Line 
Mondamin Ct. . 
Kent St. . , . 
Southeasterly . 
Beech St. . . 
Easterly & west'ly 
Arlington St. 
Washington St. 
Northwesterly 
Bond St. . 
Moreland St. 
B. & L. R. R. 



'ly 



Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Pubhc. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private, 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Pubhc. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 



40 




20 


_ 


40 


_ 


40 


1,773 


40 


1,280 


40 


- 


40 


150 


30 


_ 


40 


- 


30 


_ 


40 


762 


30 


_ 


20 


- 


15 


_ 


40+ 


2,230 


45 


- 


4) 


_ 


30 


- 


35 


- 


25 


_ 


40 


_ 


40 


_ 


40 


_ 


40 


492 


32.71 


_ 


10 


_ 


4J 


1,430 


40 


_ 


40 


_ 


40 


2.300 


40 


_ 


40 


763 


16 


_ 


40 


470 


40 


_ 


40 


_ 


40 


555 


40 


660 


40 


985 


20 


_ 


30 


- 


40 


- 


30 


_ 


40 


_ 


40 


- 


35 


_ 


30 


_ 


35 


- 


40 


335 


40 


_ 


40 


_ 


40 


650 


35 


_ 


40 


330 


40 


330 


30 


_ 


45 


1,043 


45 


_ 


20 





*Proposed. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



417 



Street. 



From. 



To. 



Public 

or 
Private. 



Width 
in 

Feet. 



Length. 



Public. Private 



Hennessey Ct. 
Henry Ave. 
Herbert . . 
Hersey . . 
High. . . 
Highland Ave. 
Hillside Ave. 
Hillside Pk. 
Hinckley . 
Hodgdon PI. 
Holland 
Holt Ct. 
Holt's Ave. 
Homer Sq. 
Horace . 
Houghton 
Howard 
Howard 
Howe 
Hudson 
Hudson . 
Hunting 

Irving . 
Ivaloo . 

Jackson 
James . 
Jaques . 
*Jasper . 
Jay . . 
Jenny Lind Ave. 
Jenny Lind Ave. 
Jerome Ct. . . . 
Jerome . . . . 
Joseph . . . . 
Josephine Ave. . 

Joy 

Joy St. PI. . . . 



Ave. 



Kensington 
Kent Ct. . 
Kent . . . 
Kenwood . 
Kidder Ave. 
Kingman Ct. 
Kingston . 
Knapp . . 
Knowlton . 



Lake . . . 
Lam son Ct. 
Landers . . 
Laurel . . 
Lawrence . 
Lawrence . 
Lawson Terrace 
Lee . . . 
Leland . . 
Leon . . . 
Leonard PL 
Lesley Ave. 
Leslie PI. . 



Medford St. . 
Highland Ave. 
Chester St. 
Berkeley St 
Boston St. 
Medford St. 
Pearl St. . 
Walnut St. 
Broadway . 
Dane Ct. . 
Davis Sq. . 
Wyatt St. 
Oak St. . 
Bonner Ave 
South St. . 
Prospect St. 
Thorndike St. 
Whipple St. 
Marshall St. 
Central St. 
Lowell St. 
South St. . 

Holland St. 
Beacon St. 

Medford St. 
Pearl St. . 
Chauncey Ave 
Pearl St. . 
Holland St. 
Vernon St. 
Medford St. 
Sycamore St. 
Montrose St. 
Newton St. . 
Morrison Ave. 
Washington St. 
Joy St. . . 

Broadway . . 
Kent St. . . 
Somerville Ave 
Elm St. . . 
Elm St. . . 
Washington St. 
Meacham St. 
School St. . 
Oliver St. . . 

Hawkins St. . 
Linwood St. . 
School St. 
Somerville Ave 
Hinckley St. . 
Boston Ave. . 
Putnam St. . 
Medford St. . 
Washington St 
Concord Ave. 
Joy St. . . 
Highland Ave. 
Highland Ave. 



Fisk Ave. . , 
Lexington Ave. 
Day St. . . 
Oxford St. . 
Munroe St. . 
Davis Sq. 
Southwesterly 
Northwesterly 
Lawrence St. 
Northeasterly 
Broadway 
Westerly . . 
Southeasterly 
Northwesterly 
Fitchburg R. R 
Springfield St. 
Gorham St. . 
Willow Ave. 
School St. 
Lowell St. 
Cedar St. 
Cambridge Line 

Broadway . 
Park St. . . 

Maple St. . 
Veazie St. 
Bond St. . . 
Oilman St. . 
Howard St. . 
Medford St. 
Broadway 
Jerome St. . 
Jerome Ct. . 
Northwesterly 
Broadway 
Poplar St. . 
Southwesterly 

Blakeley Ave. 
Northerly 
Beacon St. . 
Billingham St. 
Willow Ave. 
Fitchburg R. R 
Campbell Pk. 
Granite St. . 
Tufts St. . . 

Church St. . 
Poplar St. . 
Westerly . . 
Summer St. . 
B. & L. R. R. 
Southwesterly 
Easterly . . 
Richdale Ave. 
Northeasterly 
Dickinson St. 
Northeasterly 
Lexington Ave. 
Easterly . . 



Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

PubUc. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 
Public. 

Private, 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 



20 
40 
4<) 
40 
50 
60 
30 
40 
30 
about 20 
60 
10 
10 

30+ 
30 
40 
40 
30 
40 
40 
40 
30 



360 
9,100 

2,650 



445 
1,368 



40 


1,180 


40 


650 


30 


_ 


40 


320 


40&45 


2,250 


40 


- 


40 


- 


40 


910 


40 


- 


10 


_ 


20 


- 


40 


- 


45 


- 


30 


- 


30 


- 


40 


_ 


about 25 


- 


25&40 


- 


40 


- 


40 


- 


25 


- 


40 


- 


40 


_ 


40 


- 


40 


860 


20 


- 


40 


- 


40 


940 


35 


- 


35 


- 


5 


_ 


40 


- 


40 


- 


40 


- 


13+ 


- 


40 


- 


12 


- 



250^ 
290' 

230* 
1,100 

150 
245 
430 
150 

70 
100 
200 
510 

750 
430 
255 



1,380 
125 



150 



300 
525 

590 
150 
125 
380 
1,715 
1,150 
175 

440 
420 
740 
322 
1,280 
400 
320 
350 
925 



370 
280 

650 
710 
200 
385 
250 
150 

98 
333 

75 



Proposed. 



418 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 













Length. 








Public 


Width 






Street. 


From. 


To. 


or 


in 
















Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


Lester PI. . . . 


Meacham St. 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




190 


Lexington Ave. . 


Willow Ave. 


Cedar St. ... 


Private. 


50 


- 


1,360 


Liberty Ave. . . 


Appleton St. 


Broadway 


Private. 


40 


- 


1,495 


Lincoln Ave. . . 


Lincoln St. . 


Mt. Verno-i St. . 


Private. 


40 


- 


450 


Lincoln PI. 


Lincoln Ave. 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


9 


- 


120 


Lincoln .... 


Broadway. . . 


Perkins St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


550 


- 


Linden .... 


Somerville Ave. 


Fitchburg R. R. . 


Private. 


30 


- 


705 


Linden Ave. . . 


Elm St. ... 


Summer St. . 


Public. 


45 


1,050 


- 


Linden Ave. . . 


Summer St. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


45 


- 


250 


Linden PI. . . . 


Linden Ave . . 


Northwesterly . 


Private. 


20 


_ 


160 


Line .... 


Washington St. . 


Cambridge Line . 


Private. 


33 


- 


1,750 


Linehan Ct. . . 


Linwood St. . . 


Chestnut St. . . 


Private. 


about 15 


- 


200 


Linwood PI. . 


Linwood St. . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


about 12 


- 


150 


Linwood 


Somerville Ave. 


Washington St. 


Public. 


50 


2,050 


- 


London .... 


Linwood St. . . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


3-10 


Loring ... 


Somerville Ave. 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


400 


Louisburg PL . . 


Autumn St. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


13 


- 


90 


Lowell .... 


Somerville Ave. 


Albion St. . . . 


Private. 


33+ 


- 


2,580 


Lowell .... 


B. & L. R. R. . 


Medford St. . . 


Private. 


33+ 


- 


1,200 


*Lowden 


Broadway . . 


Fosket St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


1,215 


Madison . . . 


School St. 


Sycamore St. . . 


Public. 


40 


891 


_ 


Main .... 


Broadway , . 


Medford Line . . 


Public. 


50 


950 


- 


*Malden . . . 


Mystic Ave. . . 


Melrose St. . . . 


Private. 


50 


- 


1,360 


*Mallet .... 


Willow Ave. . . 


Liberty Ave. . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


580 


Malloy Ct. . . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Merriam St. . . 


Private. 


30 & 15 


- 


520 


Mansfie'd . . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Washington St. 


Private. 


40 


- 


730 


Maple Ave. . . 


School St. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


300 


Maple .... 


Poplar St. . . 


Jackson St. . . . 


Private. 


30 


- 


470 


Maple PI. . . . 


Marshall St. . . 


Maple Ave. . . . 


Private. 


5 


- 


125 


Marion .... 


Concord Ave. . 


Adrian St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


170 


Marshall . . . 


Broadway . . 


Pearl St 


Public. 


40 


1,650 


- 


Mason Ave. . . 


Orchard St. . . 


Cambridge Line . 


Private. 


35 


- 


220 


May PI. ... 


Hawkins St. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


12 


- 


100 


McGregor PI. . . 


Wiggles worth St. 


Walnut St. ._ . . 


Private. 


about 10 


- 


250 


Meacham . . . 


Orchard St. . . 


Cambridge Line . 


Public. 


40 


ice 


- 


Meacham . . . 


Arlington B.R.R 


Orchard St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


600 


Meacham . . . 


Mt. Vernon Ave. 


Medford Line . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


800 


Mead .... 


Cameron Ave. . 


Moore St. ... 


Private. 


40 


- 


340 


Medford . . . 


Cambridge Line 


Medford Line . . 


Public. 


50 & 55 


10,100 


- 


Melrose . . , 


Mystic Ave. . . 


Middlesex Ave. 


Private. 


50 


- 


2,310 


Melvin .... 


Bonair St. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


35 


- 


150 


Melvin .... 


Broadway . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


317 


MerriaiTi . . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Charlestown St. . 


Private. 


30 


- 


500 


Middlesex Ave. . 


Mystic Ave. . . 


Medford Line . . 


Public. 


60 


3,400 


- 


Milk St. PI. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


about 30 


- 


100 


Miller .... 


Sacramento St. . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


33 


- 


350 


Mills 


Walnut St. . . 


Sargent Ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


560 


- 


Miner .... 


Vernon St. . . 


Ames St. ... 


Private. 


40 


- 


245 


Mondamin Ct. 


Ivaloo St. . . 


Harrison St. . . 


Private. 


25 


- 


250 


Montgomery Ave. 


Broadway . . . 


Wellington Ave. . 


Public. 


40 


265 


- 


Montrose Ct. . . 


Montrose St. 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


12 


- 


110 


Montrose , 


School St. . . 


Sycamore St. . . 


Public. 


40 


886 


- 


Moore .... 


Holland St. . . 


Mead St. ... 


Public. 


40 


695 


- 


Moreland . . . 


Main St. . . . 


Meacham St. . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


7(0 


Morgan .... 


Beacon St. . . 


Park St 


Public. 


40 


- 


350 


Morrison Ave. 


Willow Ave. 


Cedar St. ... 


Private. 


50 


- 


1,366 


Morrison PL . . 


Morrison St. 


Northerly & east'ly 


Private. 


15 & 20 


- 


370 


Morrison 


Willow Ave. 


Elm St 


Public. 


40 


1,700 


- 


Mortimer PL . . 


Marshall St. 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 


- 


150 


Morton .... 


Glen St. . . . 


Knowlton St. . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


285 


Mossland . . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Elm St 


Pub ic. 


41) 


350 


- 


Mountain Ave. . 


Linden Ave. . 


Porter St. . . . 


Private. 


22 


- 


310 



* Proposed, 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



419 



Street. 



From. 



To. 



Public 

or 
Private. 



Width 

in 
Feet. 



Length. 



Public. Private. 



Mousal PI 
Mt. Pleasant Ave 
Mt. Pleasant Ct 
Mt. Pleasant 
Mt. Vernon Ave 
Mt. Vernon 
Munroe . , 
Murdock 
Murray . . 
Museum 
Myrtle Ct. . 
Myrtle . . 
Mystic Ave. 
Mystic . . 
Mystic . . 

Nashua . . 
Nevada Ave. 
Newberne . 
Newbury . 
Newman PI. 
Newton PI. 
Newton . . 
Norfolk . . 
North 

North Union 
Norton . . 
Norwood Ave 

Oak . . . 
Oak . . . 
Oak St. PL 
Oakland Ave. 
Olive Ave. 
Olive Sq. . 
Oliver 
Orchard 
Osgood 
Otis . 
Oxford 
Oxford 



Packard Ave. 
Palmer Ave. 
Park Ave. . 
Park PI. . 
Park . . . 
Parker PI. . 
Parker . . 
Partridge Ave 
Patten Ct. 
Pauline . . 
Pearl . . . 
Pearl St. PI. 
♦Pearson Ave. 
Pembroke Ct. 
Pembroke . 
Perkins PI. 
Perkins . . 
Pinckney PI. 
Pinckney . 
Pitman . . 
Pleasant Ave. 



North Union St 
Curtis St. . , 
Perkins St. . 
Broadway . . 
Main St. . . 
Washington St. 
Walnut St. . 
Uedar St. . , 
Washington St. 
Beacon St. 
Myrtle St. 
Washington St. 
Charlestown Line 
Washington St. 
Benedict St. . 



Richardson St 
Village St. 
Appleton St. 
Holland St. 
Cedar St . 
Newton St. 
Webster Ave 
Webster Ave 
Broadway . 
Mystic Ave. 
Nashua St. 
Broadway . 

Prospect St. 
Angle . . 
Oak St. . 
Marshall St. 
Linden Ave. 
Lake St. , 
Franklin St. 
Cambridge 
Granite St. 
Cross St. . 
School St. 
Beacon St. 



Line 



Broadway . 
Franklin St 
Elm St. . 
Laurel St. 
Somerville Ave 
Porter St. , 
Washington St 
Vernon St. 
Cutter St. . 
Broadway . 
Crescent St 
Pearl St. . 
Morrison Ave 
Pembroke St 
Central St. 
Perkins St. 
Franklin St. 
Pinckney St. 
Washington St 
Beech St. . . 
Walnut St. . 



B. & M. R. R 

Northwesterly 
Southwesterly 
Perkins St. . 
Meacham St. 
Broadway 
High St. . . 
Clyde St. . 
Southerly 
Cambridge Line 
Easterly . . . 
Perkins St. . 
Medford Line 
Somerville Ave 
Mystic Ave. 

B. & L. R. R. 
Hanson St. . 
Morrison St. 
Cambridge Line 
Southeasterly 
Easterly . . 
Concord Ave. 
Cambridge Line 
Medford Line 
Northeasterly 
Southeasterly 
Medford St. 



Angle . . . 
Cambridge Line 
Northerly 
School St. . 
Southeasterly 
Southerly 
Cross St. . . 
Meacham St. 
Easterly & west'ly 
Wigglesworth St 
Central St. . . 
Cambridge Line 

Medford Line . 
Northwesterly . 
Wallace St. . . 
Easterly & north'ly 
Beacon St. . . 
Northwesterly . 
Fremont Ave. . 
Broadway . . 
Southeasterly . 
Holland St. . . 
Medford St. . 
Northeasterly . 
Boston Ave. 
Southwesterly , 
Sycamore St. . 
Northeasterly . 
Charlestown Line 
Southeasterly 
Perkins St. . . 
Belmont St. . . 
Vinal Ave. . . 



Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Pubhc. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Pubhc. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 



20 




40 


- 


40 


- 


33 


570 


50 


- 


40&50 


1,640 


40 


- 


30 


_ 


30 


_ 


40 


_ 


10 


- 


40 


1,400 


60&66 


7,250 


40 


360 


40 


- 


35 


_ 


20 


_ 


40 


- 


40 


1,250 


10+ 


- 


about 10 


- 


40+ 


650 


40 


200 


40 


2,550 


30 


_ 


20 


- 


40 


350 


40 


670 


30 


- 


4 


_ 


40 


440 


25 


_ 


about 15 


- 


40 


1,050 


40 


1,625 


40 


_ 


40 


1,200 


30+ 


- 


50 


100 


60 


_ 


20 


_ 


40 


450 


30&20 


_ 


50 


1,300 


20 


- 


35 


_ 


40 


1,457 


8 


- 


40 


. 


40&50 


4,750 


20 


_ 


45 


- 


25 


- 


40 


- 


20 


_ 


40 


1,350 


24 


- 


40 


1,170 


30 


- 


40 


470 



200* 
700^ 
260^ 

800 

400 
900 
250 
170 
100 



330 

640 
200 
200 

100 
100 



600 
200 



530 

85 

155 
100 



450 
1,330 



2,000 
200 

350 

150 
200 

100 
775 

200 
1,300 
130 
440 
200 

1.25 

800 



*ProDOsed. 



420 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Street. 



From. 



To. 



Public 

or 
Private. 



Width 

in 
Feet. 



Length. 



Public. 



Private. 



Row 



Poplar Ct. 
Poplar . 
Porter Ave 
Porter Pi. 
Porter . 
Porter . 
Prescott 
Preston . 
Professors' 
Prospect 
Prospect Hill Av 
Prospect PI. . 
Putnam . . . 

Quincy . . . 

Randolph PL . 
Raymond Ave. 
Record's PI. . 
Reed's Ct. . . 
Remick Ct. 
Richardson 
Richdale Ave. 
RichmondHi'h'd 
Roberts . . 
Robinson . 
Rogers Ave. 
Roseland . 
Rossmore . 
Rush . . . 
Russell . . 

Sacramento 
Sanborn Ave. 
Sargent Ave. 
Sartwell Ave. 
School . 
Sellon PL . 
Sewall Ct. . 
Sewall . 
Shawmut PL 
Shawmut 
Shedd . . 
Sherman PL 
Sherman 
Sibley Ct. . 
Sibley PL . 
Simpson Ave. 
Skehan . . 
Smith Ave. 
Snow PL 
Somerville Ave. 
South 
*Southwick Ave 
Spring Ct. . 
Spring . . 
Springfield . 
Stickney Ave. 
St. James Ave 
Stone Ave. 
Stone PL . 
Summer 
Summit Ave. 



Poplar St. . 
Somerville Ave 
Porter St. . . 
Porter St. . . 
Elm St. . . 
Summer St. . 
Summer St. . 
School St. 
College Ave. . 
Washington St. 
Medford St. . 
Prospect St. . 
Summer St. . 

Somerville Ave 

Cross St. . . 
Curtis St. . . 
Broadway . . 
Oliver St. . . 
Cutter St. . . 
Lowell St. 
School St. 
Madison St. . 
Lawrence St. 
Central St. 
Morrison Ave. 
Beacon St. 
Somerville Ave 
Broadway . . 
Elm St. . . 

Somerville Ave 
Warren Ave. 
Broadway . . 
Cedar St. . . 
Somerville Ave 
Marshall St. . 
Sewall St. 
Grant St. . . 
Shawmut St. 
Washington St. 
Somerville Ave 
Sargent Ave. 
Somerville Ave 
Cutter St. . 
Cutter St. . 
Broadway . 
Dane St. . 
Beacon St. 
Belmont St. 
E. Camb. Line 
Medford St. . 
Morrison Ave. 
Somerville Ave 
Somerville Ave 
Concord Ave 
Marshall St. 
Elm St. . 
Union Sq. 
Stone Ave. 
Bow St. 
Walnut St. 



Southeasterly . 
Joy St. ... 
Northwesterly . 
Northwesterly , 
Summer St. . 
Highland Ave. . 
Highland Ave. . 
Summer St. . . 
Curtis St. . . 
Cambridge Line 
High St. . . . 
E. Newton St. . 
Highland Ave. 

Summer St. 

Westerly . . . 
North St. . . 
Southwesterly . 
Southwesterly . 
Southeasterly . 
Lawrence St. . 
Sycamore St. . 
Southerly . . 
Northwesterly . 
Bartlett St. . . 
Broadway 
Cambridge Line 
Washington St. 
Flint St. . . . 
Cambridge Line 

Cambridge Line 
Walnut St. . . 
Mills St. . . . 
Cherry St. 
Broadway 
Northwesterly . 
Southwesterly . 
Temple St. . . 
Alston St. . . 
Cross St. . . 
Charlestown St. 
Marshall St. 
Frost Ave. . . 
Northwesterly . 
Northwesterly . 
Holland St. . . 
Durham St. . . 
Line St. . . . 
Easterly . . . 
N. Camb. Line 
Westerly . . . 
Boston Ave. 
Westerly . . . 
Summer St. . 
Cambridge Line 
School St. . . 
Summer St. . 
Columbus Ave. 
Southeasterly . 
Elm St. . . . 
Vinal Ave. . . 



Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

PubHc. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 



10 




30&35 


- 


20 


- 


20 


- 


45 


1,150 


45 


- 


50 


1,050 


40 


800 


40 


_ 


40&50 


2,050 


40 


450 


20 


- 


50 


1,240 


40 


700 


15 


_ 


40 


1,345 


10 


- 


20 


- 


10 


- 


35 


_ 


40 


875 


30 


- 


20 


- 


40 


- 


45 


- 


40 


100 


40 


- 


40 


1,400 


40 


700 


40 


_ 


40 


280 


40 


522 


35 


- 


40&50 


4,370 


12 


- 


25 


- 


40 


- 


30 


- 


40 


550 


40 


- 


10 


- 


35 


- 


10 


- 


10 


- 


40 


- 


30 


- 


25+ 


- 


25&30 


- 


70 & 75 


11,100 


30 


- 


40 


- 


20 


_ 


40 


1,200 


40 


800 


40 


- 


40 


488 


40 


676 


30 


- 


45 


7,700 


45 


470 



80 
650 
220 
195 

830 



1,900 
130 

244 

110 
105 
100 

480 

150 
170 

645 
1,700 

525 

600 

400 

120 

190 
650 
200 

310 
250 
270 
100 
100 
825 
720 
200 
270 

940 
990 
200 

450 

145 



*Proposed. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



421 













Length. 


Street. 


From. 


To. 


Public 


Width 






or 


in 












Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


Summit .... 


Elm St. ... 


Billingham St. . . 


Public. 


40 


262 




*Sumner . . . 


Lawrence St. 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 


- 


175 


Sunnyside Ave. . 


Walnut St. . . 


Wigglesworth St. . 


Private. 


35 


- 


250 


Sycamore . . . 


Broadway . . 


Medford St. . . 


Public. 


45 


1,250 


- 


Sycamore . . . 


MedfordSt. . . 


Highland Ave. . . 


Private. 


33&40 


- 


1,350 


Sydney .... 


Wheatland St. . 


Temple St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


925 


Taunton . . . 


So. Wyatt St.. . 


Marion St. . . . 


Private. 


30&20 


_ 


260 


Taylor's PI. . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Southerly . . , 


Private. 


15 


- 


200 


Taylor .... 


Mystic Ave. . . 


Sydney St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


310 


Temple .... 


Broadway . . 


Mystic Ave. . . 


Public. 


66 


1,540 


- 


Tenney Ct. . . 


Mystic Ave. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


30 


- 


400 


Tennyson . . . 


Forster St. . . 


Medford St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


469 


- 


Tennyson . . . 


MedfordSt. . . 


Pembroke St. . . 


Private. 


40 


_ 


400 


Thorndike . . . 


Holland St. . . 


Campbell Park 


Private. 


40 


_ 


580 


Thorpe PL . . 


Highland Ave. . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


30 


_ 


450 


Thurston . . . 


Broadway . . 


Richdale Ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


1,660 


— 


Tower Ct. . . . 


Tyler St. . . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


25 


- 


150 


*Tower .... 


Crown St. . . 


Highland Ave. . . 


Private. 


40 


_ 


550 


Tremont PI. . . 


Tremont St. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


about 10 


_ 


75 


Tremont . . . 


Webster Ave. . 


Cambridge Line . 


Public. 


40 


589 


_ 


Trull .... 


Vernon St. . . 


Medford St. . . 


Private. 


40 


_ 


1,050 


Trull Lane . . . 


Highland Ave. . 


Oxford St. . . . 


Private. 


15 


_ 


200 


Tube Works Ct. . 


Somerville Ave. 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 


_ 


150 


Tufts .... 


Washington St. . 


Cross St 


Public. 


40 


940 


_ 


Tyler .... 


Vine St. . . . 


Dane St 


Public. 


40 


404 


- 


Union .... 


Broadway . . 


Mystic Ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


330 


_ 


Union PI. . . . 


Linwood St. . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


10 


- 


100 


Veazie .... 


Walnut St. . . 


Bradley St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


_ 


650 


Vernon .... 


Central St. . . 


Jenny Lind Ave. . 


Public. 


40 


740 


_ 


Vernon .... 


Jenny Lind Ave. 


Lowell St. . . . 


Private. 


30 


- 


600 


Villa Ave. , . . 


Win slow Ave. . 


Arlington B. R. R. 


Private. 


35 


_ 


200 


Village .... 


Dane St. . . . 


Vine St 


Private. 


25 


_ 


370 


Vinal Ave. . . . 


Summer St. . . 


Highland Ave. . . 


Public. 


45 


1,400 


_ 


Vinal .... 


Richardson St. . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 


_ 


200 


Vine 


Somerville Ave. 


Beacon St. . . . 


Private. 


25&40 


_ 


1,400 


Virginia .... 


Aldrich St. . . 


Jasper St. ... 


Public. 


40 


405 




Wade Ct. . . . 


Cedar St. . . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


20 


_ 


180 


Waldo .... 


Highland Ave. . 


Hudson St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


_ 


287 


Wallace. . . . 


Holland St. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,350 


_ 


Walnut .... 


Bow St. . . . 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


40 


3,830 


_ 


Walter PI. . . . 


Walter St. . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


222 


Walter .... 


Walnut St. . . 


Bradley St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


_ 


548 


Ward .... 


MedfordSt. . . 


Earl St 


Private. 


30 


_ 


610 


Warren Ave. . . 


Union Sq. . . 


Columbus Ave. 


Public. 


40 


650 


_ 


Warren .... 


Medford St. . . 


Cambridge Line . 


Private. 


30 


_ 


100 


Warwick . . . 


Cedar St. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


40 


- 


630 


Washington Ave. 


Washington St. . 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


18 


- 


350 


Washington . . 


Charlest'n Line . 


Cambridge Line . 


Public. 


60 to 100 


7,250 


_ 


Water .... 


South St. . . . 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


25 


- 


250 


Waverly . . . 


Washington St. . 


Southerly . . . 


Private. 


35 


- 


200 


Ware .... 


Curtis St. . . . 


Northwesterly . 


Private. 


40 


- 


700 


Webster Ave. . . 


Union Sq. . . 


Cambridge Line . 


Public. 


49.5 


1,950 


_ 


Webster . . . 


Franklin St. . . 


Cross St 


Public. 


40 


1,000 


_ 


Wellington Ave. . 


Walnut St. . . 


Montgomery Ave. 


Public. 


40 


215 


_ 


Wellington Ave. . 


Montgomery Ave. 


Easterly . . . . 


Private. 


40 


_ 


85 


Wesley Pk. . . 


Wesley Sq. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Public. 


40 


405 




Wesley .... 


Otis St. ... 


Pearl St 


Private. 


30&40 


- 


515 


Wfcst 


Broadway . . . 


Heath St. . . . 


Private. 


30 


_ 


250 


West 


Hawthorne St. . 


Arlington B. R. R. 


Private. 


30 


~ 


590 






♦Proposed. 











422 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 













Length. 








Public 


Width 










To. 














Private. 


in 
Feet. ^ 


Public. 


Private » 


Weston Ave. . . 


Clarendon Ave. . 


Broadway . . . 


Private. 


40 




525 


Wheatland . . . 


Broadway . . . 


Jaques St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


495 




Wheatland . . . 


Jaques St. . , 


Mystic Ave. . . 


Private. 


40 


_ 


855 


Wheeler. . . . 


Pinckney St. . . 


Mt. Vernon St. . 


Private. 


40 


_ 


26a 


Whipple . . . 


Hawthorne St. . 


Arlington B. R. R. 


Private. 


30 


_ 


575 


White .... 


Elm St. . . . 


Cambridge Line . 


Private. 


20 


_ 


300 


White St. PI. . . 


White St. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 


_ 


200 


Wigglesworth . . 


Bonair St. . . 


Pearl St 


Private. 


40 


_ 


740 


William .... 


Chandler St. . . 


Elm St 


Public. 


40 


381 




Williams Ct. . . 


Porter St. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


3f) 


- 


150 


Willoughby . . 


Central St. . . 


Sycamore St. . . 


Private. 


30 


. 


400 


Willow Ave. . . 


Elm St. ... 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


50 


3,440 




Willow PI. . . . 


Cambridge Line 


South St. ... 


Private. 


25 


_ 


150 


*Willowdale . . 


Willow Ave. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


40 


- 


550. 


Wilson Ave. . . 


Broadway . . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


20 


~ 


3ia 


Wilton .... 


Lowell St. . . 


Lawrence St. . . 


Private. 


35 


_ 


470 


Windom . . . 


Elm St. . . . 


Summer St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


_ 


300 


Winslow Ave. 


Elm St. . . . 


Grove St. ... 


Public. 


40 


514 


_ 


Winslow Ave. 


Grove St. . . . 


Clifton St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


_ 


572 


Winter .... 


Elm St. . . . 


Holland St. . . . 


Private. 


30 


_ 


430 


Winter Hill Cir. . 


Broadway . . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


25 


- 


177 


Winthrop Ave. . 


Broadway . . . 


Mystic Ave. . . 


Public. 


50 


1,170 


- 


Woodbine . . . 


Centre St. . . 


Lowell St. . . . 


Private. 


30 


- 


600. 


*Woods Ave. . . 


North St. . . . 


Alewife Brook . . 


Private. 


40 


_ 


1,350 


WyattCt. . . . 


South Wyatt St. 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


13 


- 


200 


Wyatt (South) . 


Concord Ave. . 


Northerly . , . 


Private. 


40 


- 


400 


Wyatt (North) . 


Washmgton St. . 


Southerly . . . 


Private. 


40 


~ 


350. 


* Proposed 


UNNAMED STREETS. 




Meacham St. 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




105 




Pearl St. . . . 


Pearl St 


Private. 


40 


- 


56a 




Somerville Ave. 


Northeasterly , . 


Private. 


24 


- 


110 


Total . . . 


254 66* 


184,956 
















PubHc, 4 


8.23 miles; private, 3 


5.03 miles. 











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14,936 sq. yds. paving 

'6.223 lin. ft. edgestone set and reset . . 
2,620 sq. yds. sidewalk relaid .... 
457 sq. yds. crossings relaid 






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REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMIHEE ON FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 11, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 11, 1893. 
Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Committee on Fire Department, ") 
January 2, 1893. j 

To the City Council of Somerville : — 

The following is the final report of the committee on fire depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1892 : — 

The manual force of the department consists of eighty-three 
members, including one chief and one assistant engineer. 

A new fuel wagon has been purchased during the year of Messrs, 
E. Teel & Co., of Medford, for Hose 5, at a cost of $73.50 ; also a 
new hose wagon has been purchased from the above named party 
for $480.00, and placed in Steamer House No. 1. 

A three-horse hitch has been purchased for Hook and Ladder 
Company No. 1 ; there has also been ordered, but not yet received, 
one patent three-horse engine pole, complete, for Steamer 1. 

A brick hose trough for the washing of hose has been placed in 
Steamer 4 house, at a cost of $150.00. 

Fifteen hundred feet of hose has been purchased during the year, 
of the Boston Belting Company, at a cost of $900.00. 

Two fire-alarm boxes have been added during the year, one 
placed in Gilman square and one in Prospect street, near Oak street. 

One old hose carriage has been sold during the year. 

The usual repairs for the several houses have been made during 
the year as required, and the buildings are in good condition. 

The price paid for water from the hydrants for the year was 
$3,220.00 net, while in 1891 there was a discount of ten per cent., 
which reduced the bill to $2,898.00. 

The committee recommends that the addition be built to the 
steamer house on Central Hill Park, in accordance with plans already 



428 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

secured, and that a chemical engine be placed therein ; also a ten- 
circuit repeater for the fire-alarm telegraph. 

They also recommend that a new hook and ladder truck be 
added to the department, and located in West Somerville. 

We present herewith the report of the chief engineer, and 
recommend that it be printed with the annual reports. 

The appropriation, receipts, and expenditures are shown by the 
following statements : — 

FIRE DEPARTMENT ACCOUNT. 

4 Credit. 

Appropriation . . . . , $37,000 00 

Receipts : — 

For manure sold . $54 00 

old copper, zinc, etc. 125 73 
old hose carriage . 15 00 



194 73 



Total credit . . . $37,194 73 

Debit. 



Expenditures : — 



salaries of permanent men 


$16,224 28 


salaries of call-men 


8,314 00 


substitute drivers . 


966 51 


improvements and repairs of 




apparatus and vehicles . 


1,197 84 


new vehicles and apparatus . 


560 00 


improvements and repairs of 




buildings and furniture. 




and new furniture . 


1,293 48 


maintenance and extension of 




fire-alarm telegraph 


1,435 51 


hose and hose-pipe and repair- 




ing same 


1,539 98 


grain and feed 


938 40 



Amounts carried forward . . $32,470 00 $37,194 73 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



429 



Amounts brought forward 


$32,470 00 


$37,194 73 


hay and straw 


1,131 05 




horseshoeing 


393 27 




horse medicine and doctoring, 87 05 




harnesses and repairing same 


298 56 




fuel .... 


870 17 




supplies . 


161 56 




water for hydrants 


3,220 00 




water for department build 






ings 


130 00 




gas . . . . 


656 95 




ice .... 


49 50 




washing and ironing 


130 85 




telephones 


129 80 




hand fire-extinguishers . 


164 18 




insurance 


131 25 




incidentals 


968 25 




Total debit 


. 


40,991 94 



Amount overdrawn 



$3,797 21 



For the committee, 



FRANK E. FITTS, Chairman. 
WILLIAM P. MITCHELL, Clerk. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 11, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk, 



In Common Council, January 11, 1893. 
Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of Chief Engineer of Fire Department, > 

December 31, 1892. j 

-To the Committee on Fire Department : — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you a report of the opera- 
tions of this department for the year 1892. 

In presenting this report, I desire to thank his honor the mayor, 
the chairman, and other members of the committee, for the interest 
they have shown in all matters appertaining to its welfare ; to the 
officers and other members of the department, I extend my thanks 
for their good work, as evinced in their successful efforts in extin- 
guishing fires. 

NUMBER OF FIRE ALARMS. 



The total number of bell alarms was 
The total number of still alarms was 
The loss by fire was 
The insurance on property was 



116 
16 

$65,537 00 
142,250 00 



The causes for which the alarms were given were as follows 

No. of Alarm. 

1. Hot irons in closet. 

2. False alarm. 

3. Chimney fire. 

4. Overheated oil stove. 

5. Breaking of lighted lamp. 

6. Fire in Medford. 

7. Gas jet in contact with wood. 

8. Igniting of japan on hot stove. 



434 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

9. Drying of plastering. 

10. Igniting of naphtha from other fire. 

11. Unknown. 

12. Sparks on shingled roof. 

13. Making fire with kerosene oil. 

14. Fire in Cambridge. 

15. Unknown. 

16. Alarm from automatic signal. 

17. Chimney fire, 

18. Fire in Arlington. 

19. Sparks in picker room from machinery. 

20. Burning of rubbish. 

21. Sparks on roof. 

22. Caught from fire box in boiler room. 

23. Hot ashes in barrel. 

24. Overheated oil stove. 

25. Railroad fence set on fire by sparks. 

26. Fire in Medford. 

27. Children playing with matches. 

28. Overheated oil stove. 

29. Burning of rubbish. 

30. Fire in Medford. 

31. Smoke mistaken for fire. 

32. False alarm 

33. Breaking of kerosene lamp. 

34. Unknown. 

35. Unknown. 

36. Slacking of lime. 

37. Supposed incendiary. 

38. Sparks on roof. 

39. Burning of rubbish set fire to building. 

40. Igniting of kettle of tar from candle. 

41. Chimney fire. 

42. Smokestack against wooden roof. 
, 43. Curtain in contact with gas jet. 

44. Children playing with matches. 

45. Igniting of oil waste. 

46. Breaking of kerosene lamp. 

47. Boiling over of a pan of fat. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 435 

48. Smokestack in contact with roof. 

49. Sparks on roof. 

50. Sparks on roof. 

51. False alarm. 

52. Fire-crackers on roof. 

53. Fire crackers on roof. 

54. Overheated oil stove. 

55. Tree blown down. 

56. Sparks from a tobacco pipe. 

57. Breaking of kerosene lamp. 

58. Electric light wire (defective insulator). 

59. Burning of rubbish. 

60. Sparks from tobacco pipe. 

61. False alarm. 

62. Unknown. 

63. Sparks on roof. 

64. Smoke mistaken for fire. 

65. Killing vermin with naphtha. 

66. Accidental dropping of matches in closet. 

67. Fire in Medford. 

68. Unknown. 

Supposed rats and matches. \ 

70. • Sparks entering hay-loft through open door. 

71. Chimney fire. 

72. Rags round stove pipe. 

73. Overheated oil stove. 

74. Smoking in shed. 

75. Sparks from tobacco pipe. 

76. Electric wire setting fire to a tree. 

77. Sparks on roof. 

78. Sparks on roof. 

79. Fire in Medford. 
80. ' Unknown. 

81. Unknown. 

82. Igniting of gas from lantern. 

83. Unknown. 

84. Fire set by boys. 

85. Supposed incendiary. 
-86. Fire in Cambridge. 



436 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

87. Burning of old mattress. 

88. Filling lighted lamp. 

89. Igniting of paper from hot stove. 

90. Chimney defective. 

91. Fire in Medford. 

92. Sparks on roof. 

93. Sparks on roof. 

94. Escaping steam mistaken for fire. 

95. Alarm from automatic signal. 

96. Unknown. 

97. Falling of lighted lamp in repair shop. 

98. Boiling over of a cement pot. 

99. Sparks from hoisting engine fire box. 

100. Unknown. 

101. Burning of hay-stack. 

102. Tablecloth in contact with lamp. 

103. Defective fire-place. 

104. Rags round stove pipe. 

105. Unknown. 

106. Oily rags in closet near hot-water tank. 

107. Dropping of lighted match. 

108. Defective chimney. 

109. Smokestack in contact with roof boards. 

110. Hot stove set fire to casing. 

111. Sparks from burning grass. 

112. Unknown. 

113. Wood floor timbers built into chimneys. 

114. Unknown (caught in closet). 

115. Drying of plastering. 

116. Chimney fire. 

APPARATUS IN SERVICE. 

The apparatus in service consists of two steam fire-engines, one 
hook and ladder truck, five hose wagons, one combined chemica 
engine and hose reel. The hose wagons are equipped with 900 
feet of hose each, forty-three feet of ladders, and two portable chemical 
extinguishers. 

There is 8,000 feet of good hose in service. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMTNT. 



437 



MANUAL FORCE. 

The manual force consists of eighty-three men, divided as 
follows : — 

Chief engineer .... 

Assistant engineer . 
Two engine companies, 14 men each 
Two hose companies, 9 men each . 
Two hose companies, 10 men each . 
One hook and ladder company, 15 men 




Total 



8S 



RECOMMENDATIONS. 

The rapid growth of the city in combustible buildings, placed in 
close proximity to one another, renders our city especially liable for 
fires to extend from one building to another, and thus become a con- 
flagration. With these conditions there is no piece of fire apparatus 
we need so much as a chemical engine, and it should be located in 
the building occupied by Engine No. 1 or the immediate vicinity ; it 
will then be of equal value for service in Wards One, Two, and Three. 

LADDER SERVICE. 

As there is but one ladder truck to cover the whole city, 
another truck should be put in service in the westerly section of 
the city, as the one we now have is located in Union square, remote 
from West Somerville. 



FIRE-ALARM SYSTEM. 

The fire-alarm system as now constituted is unreliable by reason 
of its being divided only into three circuits to cover the entire city. 
If one of these circuits breaks, one-third of the city is without any 
means of giving an alarm. I therefore earnestly recommend, as in 
previous years, that a ten-circuit repeater be put in service, so that 
the city can be divided into as many circuits as thought desirable ; 
then if one circuit is broken, the close proximity of a box on another 
circuit will furnish the means of giving an alarm. 



438 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



FIRE-ALARM BOXES. 

Many fire-alarm boxes are required, but none of these additions, 
either increased number of circuits, new repeater, or additional boxes, 
can be provided until more room is furnished for the battery. 

ENLARGING STEAMER HOUSE. 

Plans for the enlarging of Engine House No. 1 were procured 
lay the committee of 1891 for the purpose of providing room for these 
improvements. 

These plans will have to be carried out, or other arrangements 
made, before any increase or change can be made in the telegraph 
system. 

The purchase of land and erection of a new station for Ward 
One is now in the hands of the committee on fire department. 

PERMANENT MEN. 

The number of permanent men should be increased. I recom- 
mend that a permanent captain be appointed for Engine Company 
No. 1, and two permanent men on Engine No. 4, one of them to be 
detailed as hoseman on the chemical engine, and a permanent man on 
Hook and Ladder No. 1. 

FIRE-ALARM BOXES AND HYDRANTS. 

Fire-alarm boxes and hydrants are very important factors to the 
successful working of the fire department in putting out fires. To 
arrive at a fire soon after it is discovered and quickly put it out 
requires signal boxes to be placed in frequent positions and hydrants 
not more tlian 300 feet apart. I recommend that eight new alarm 
boxes be put in service, and fifty hydrants. 

TABLE SHOWING THE NUMBER OF MILES RUN BY EACH 

COMPANY. 

Engine Company No. 1 ...... . 214 

Hose Company No. 1 ....... 152 

Hose Company No. 2 ....... 138 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



439 



Hose Company No. 3 
Engine Company No. 4 
Hose Company No. 5 
Ladder Company No. 1 



80 
221 
149 
215 



TABLE SHOWING NUMBER OF FEET OF HOSE USED BY EACH 

COMPANY. 



Engine Company No. 1, 2^-inch hose 
Hose Company No. 1, 2^-inch hose 
Hose Company No. 2, 2^-inch hose 
Hose Company No. 3, 2^-inch hose 
Engine Company No. 4, 2^-inch hose 
Hose Company No. 5, 2^-inch hose 
Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, small hose 
Chemical Engine No. 4, small hose . 

Total number of feet of 2^-inch hose 
Total number of feet of 1-inch hose 



18,150 
16,350 
12,950 
11,950 
10,300 
16,450 
300 

5,800 
86,150 

6,100 



TABLE SHOWING NUMBER OF FEET OF LADDERS USED BY 

EACH COMPANY. 



Engine Company No. 1 

Hose Company No. 1 

Hose Company No. 2 

Hose Company No. 3 

Engine Company No. 4 

Hose Company No. 5 

Hook and Ladder Company No 



60 
129 
215 

69 

525 

280 

3,279 



TABLE SHOWING THE NUMBER OF BELL ALARMS ON EACH 

DAY OF THE WEEK. 



Sunday 


17 


Monday ..... 


20 


Tuesday 


.... 14 


Wednesday , . . . 


. . . 16 


Thursday . 


28 


Friday ..... 


12 


Saturday 


9 



440 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE SHOWING THE NUMBER OF BELL ALARMS DURING 

THE DAY AND NIGHT. 



From 7 A. M. to 7 P. M. 
From 7 P. M. to 7 A. M. 



65 
51 



NUMBER OF ALARMS IN EACH MONTH. 



January 
February 
March 
April . 
May . 
June . 
July . 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 



ACCIDENTS TO FIREMEN. 



4 
7 
5 

13 

15 

17 

10 

16 

5 

6 

9 

9 



Daniel R. Spike, Hose Company No. 2, fell from ladder ; bone 
fractured. 

William H. Dennis, Engine Company No. 4, fell through floor ; 
hip injured. 

Nathaniel C. Barker (assistant engineer) fell from wagon; arm 
and leg injured. 

Martin S. Lacey, Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 ; arm cut 
by falling slate. 

Merrill N. Bent, Hose Company No. 5 ; face burnt by fire blast. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 441 



ROSTER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT OF THE 
CITY OF SOMERVILLE OF 1892. 

Chief Engineer, James R. Hopkins. 
Assistant Engineer, Nathaniel C. Barker. 
Fire-alarm Operator, Edward F. Backus. 

ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 



Name. 



Frank Langer . . 
Benjamin H. Pond 
Wm. H. Whitcomb 
Joseph Young . . 
Geo. L. Blackbird . 
Fred Young . . . 
Jesse A. Lipsett 
Sewall M. Rich . . 
Oscar J. Lingley 
Fred'k A. Blackburn 
Henry A. Byrnes . 
William A. Burbank 
William A. Perry . 
George F. Harris . 



Rank. 


Age. 


Captain . . 


3Y 


Lieutenant . 


23 


Hoseman . 


32 


Hoseman . 


57 


Hoseman . 


37 


Hoseman . 


24 


Hoseman . 


26 


Hoseman . 


30 


Hoseman . 


24 


Hoseman . 


22 


Engineman. 


52 


A't Engine'n 


50 


Driver . . 


39 


Driver . . 


33 



Occupation. 



Wood-moulder . 
Poultry dealer . 
Janitor . . . 
Janitor . . . 
Janitor . . . 
Plumber . . . 
Wood-turner 
Real estate . . 
Milkman . . . 
Painter . . . 
Engineman . . 
Asst. Engineman 
Driver .... 
Driver .... 



Residence. 



Oxford St. 
Vinal Ave. 
Prescott St. 
Highland Ave. 
Highland Ave. 
School St. 
Highland Ave. 
Medford St. 
Berkeley St. 
Webster St. 
Steamer House. 
Steamer House. 
Steamer House. 
Steamer House. 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Age. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 




Thomas H. Daley . . 


C'pt.& Driv. 


47 


Driver .... 


Webster St. 




John Frizzell .... 


Lieutenant . 


36 


Painter . . . 


Everett Ave. 




Edgar F. Shaw . . . 


Hoseman . 


40 


None .... 


Cross St. 




Clarence V. Cook . . 


Hoseman . 


34 


Rubber-worker . 


Pearl St. 




George North . . . 


Hoseman . 


30 


Fish dealer . . 


Cutter St. 




Edward Grant . . . 


Hoseman . 


39 


Carpenter . . 


Webster St. 




John W. McDonald . 


Hoseman . 


39 


Milkman . . , 


Webster St. 




John W. Logan . . . 


Hoseman . 


50 


Painter . . . 


Cross St. 




James E. Lovejoy . . 


Hoseman . 


32 


Undertaker . . 


Webster St. 





442 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Age. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


Frank W. Ring . . . 


Captain . . 


33 


Teamster . . . 


Wheatland St. 


Daniel R. Spike . . 


Lieutenant . 


48 


Janitor . . 




Broadway. 


Joseph H. Hollis . . 


Hoseman . 


58 


Painter 




Jaques St. 


Charles H. Timson . 


Hoseman . 


31 


Teamster . 




Marshall St. 


Edwin R. Perham . . 


Hoseman . 


41 


Expressman 




Marshall St. 


John H. Pattee . . . 


Hoseman . 


31 


Clerk . . 




Oilman St. 


William F. Marble 


Hoseman . 


40 


Fish dealer 




Jaques St. 


Charles A. Woodbury 


Hoseman . 


41 


Teamster . 




Sargent Ave. 


Albert Irish .... 


Hoseman . 


24 


Clerk . . 




Marshall St. 


Edward W. Ring . . 


Driver . . 


46 


Driver . . 




Marshall St. 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 3. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Age. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


Charles Trull . . . 


C'pt.& Driv. 


65 


Driver .... 


Prospect St. 


Alfred R. Higgins . . 


Lieutenant . 


43 


Cooper 




Prospect St. 


Frank L. Draper . . 


Hoseman . 


40 


Machinist 




Medford St. 


Charles H. Bridges . 


Hoseman . 


44 


Machinist 




Medford St. 


John H. Cuddy . . . 


Hoseman . 


40 


Teamster . 




Bow-st. PI. 


James A. Ferguson 


Hoseman . 


33 


Cooper 




Warren Ave. 


Thomas W. Joy . . 


Hoseman . 


37 


Cooper 




Joseph St. 


Joseph H. Cribby . . 


Hoseman . 


28 


Cooper 




Prospect St. 


Henry J. Turner . . 


Hoseman . 


29 


Teamster . 




Hawkins St. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 



Name. 



Samuel H. Stevens 
Edwin F. Trefren 
Danforth S. Steele 
Eugene H. Jones 
Frank A. Hersey 
John F. Burton . 
James J. Watkins 
James I. King . 
Joseph A. Sander 
Ephriam P. Cook 
Charles H. Stearns 
Lindorf D. Bixby 
John Gillooly 



Rank. 


Age. 


C'pt.&Driv. 


50 


Lieutenant . 


36 


Hoseman . 


40 


Hoseman . 


27 


Hoseman . 


36 


Hoseman . 


36 


Hoseman . 


40 


Hoseman . 


27 


Hoseman . 


28 


Hoseman . 


50 


Driver . . 


37 


Engineer 


51 


Asst. Engi'n 


37 



Occupation. 



Driver . . . 

Water works 

Cabinet-maker 

Lineman 

Janitor 

Painter 

Tinsmith 

Painter 

Teamster 

Janitor 

Driver . 

Engineman 

Asst. Engineman 



Residence. 



Steamer House. 
Morrison St. 
Highland Ave. 
Park Ave. 
Highland Ave. 
Highland Ave. 
Broadway. 
Broadway. 
Willow Ave. 
Elm St. 

Steamer House. 
Steamer House. 
Steamer House. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



44^. 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 5. 



Name. 



Irving C. Jackson . . 
William J. Blaisdell . 
Charles H. Hilt . . . 
James H. Banks . . 
Frederick G. Jones 
Oscar P. Sheltus . . 
Merrill N. Bent . . . 
H. W. Hutchins . . 
Daniel W. McDermott 
H. G. Curtis .... 



Rank. 


Age. 


C'pt.& Driv. 


45 


Lieutenant . 


46 


Hoseman . 


42 


Hoseman . 


40 


Hoseman . 


27 


Hoseman . 


35 


Hoseman . 


29 


Hoseman . 


26 


Hoseman . 


46 


Hoseman . 


28 



Occupation. 



Driver . . 
Painter . . 
Carpenter 
Cabinet-maker 
Paper-hanger 
Cabinet-maker 
Cabinet-maker 
Teamster . . 
Painter . . 
Draper . . 



Residence. 



Lowell St. 
Quincy St. 
Porter St. 
Beacon St. 
Somerville Ave. 
Hose House. 
Beacon St. 
Dane St. 
Somerville Ave. 
Somerville Ave. 



ROBERT A. VINAL HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Age. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


Melvin B. Ricker . . 


C'pt.&Driv. 


51 


Driver .... 


Washington St. 


Horace P. Ewell . . 


Lieutenant . 


35 


Carpenter . . 


Bow-st. PI. 


William A. McLane . 


Ladderman 


33 


Engineer . . . 


Clark St. 


John E. Hill .... 


Ladderman 


47 


Salesman . . . 


Rush St. 


Patrick J. Foil en . . 


Ladderman 


33 


Upholsterer . . 


Allen St. 


Frank S. Brown . . 


Ladderman 


47 


Cooper . . . 


Washington St. 


James M. Gould . . 


Ladderman 


47 


Printer , . . 


Otis St. 


James D. Perkins, Jr. . 


Ladderman 


32 


Paper-hanger . 


Bow-st. PI. 


Charles A. Southwick 


Ladderman 


35 


Laborer . . . 


Clark St. 


Martin S. Leacy . . 


Ladderman 


30 


Painter . . . 


Washington St. 


William J. Jones . . 


Ladderman 


38 


Machinist . . 


School St. 


George A. Page . . 


Ladderman 


37 


Laborer . . . 


Webster Ave. 


Charles E. Shaw . . 


Ladderman 


38 


Paper-hanger . 


Highland Ave. 


Richard F. Clarkson . 


Ladderman 


33 


Painter . . . 


Linden St. 


J. E. Thompson . . 


Ladderman 


22 


Laborer . . . 


Webster St. 



JAMES R. HOPKINS, 

Chief of Fire Department. 



444 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



LINEMAN'S REPORT. 

SoMERViLLE, December 31, 1892. 
Chief J. R. Hopkins^ Superintendent of Fire Alarm : — 

I herewith submit to you the annual report of the fire-alarm 
department for the year ending December 31, 1892. During the 
year the system has been maintained in good condition, alarms hav- 
ing worked correctly. Two new boxes have been added during the 
year — box 224, located on Prospect street, near Oak street, and box 
331, in Oilman square. 

A larger battery room is needed, as the present room is crowded 
to its utmost capacity. As the number of wires in the city has 
increased very materially, especially the electric light wires, an 
additional permanent man is needed in this department; it being 
exceedingly difficult, at a moment's notice, to get a competent 
man temporarily. Oreat care must be used in handling the wires 
to prevent their coming in contact with electric light and trolley 
wires. It is impracticable for one man to accomplish this without 
great risk and with sufficient rapidity, especially during a strrm ; 
and in many cases it is absolutely impossible. A wagon to carry 
tools and supplies is needed to maintain the alarm safely and 
repair breaks quickly. 

The system at present consists of the following : — 

Fifty miles of wire, 53 boxes, 6 tower-bell strikers, 6 box indica- 
tors, 26 gongs, 1 five-circuit repeater, and 257 jars gravity battery. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD F. BACKUS, 

Fire- Alarm Operator. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON FUEL AND STREET LIGHTS, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 11, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 11, 1893. 
Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Committee on Fuel and Street Lights, 

January 2, 1893. 

To the City Council of Somerville : — 

The following is the final report of the committee on fuel and 
street lights for the year ending December 31, 1892 : — 

SCHOOL FUEL ACCOUNT. 



Credit. 



Appropriation 



$7,150 00 



Debit. 



Expenditures : — 



For fuel to Beach-street School 


%m 80 


Bell School 


225 83 


Bennett School . 


136 15 


Bingham School . 


176 00 


Burns School 


155 45 


Cedar-street School 


26 18 


Cummings School 


144 13 


Davis School 


176 03 


Edgerly School . 


297 50 


Forster School 


351 50 


Franklin School . 


130 96 


Glines School 


. , 533 13 


Harvard School . 


32 99 


Amounts carried forward . 


f 2,483 65 



$7,150 00 



448 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 


$2,483 65 


$7,150 00- 


High School 


306 70 


, 


Highland School 


480 78 




Jackson School . 


219 20 




Knapp School 


605 27 




Lincoln School . 


346 92 




Morse School 


673 04 




Prescott School . 


441 20 




Pope School 


1,138 52 




Prospect Hill School 


313 97 




Webster School . 


138 43 




Total debit . 


. 


7,147 68 


Balance unexpended . 


$2 32 



STREET LIGHTS ACCOUNT. 



Credit. 



Appropriation 



Expenditures : — 



Debit. 



f27,000|00 



For lighting and care of oil lamps, 


$42 90 




electric lighting 


26,327 15 




electric mast arms 


10 00 




moving street lamps 


49 50 




advertising for contract (elec- 






tric lighting) . 


18 40 




carriage hire 


46 50 




cutting off gas supplies 


35 00 




Total debit 




26,529 45 


• • • 


Balance unexpended 


$470 55 



FUEL. 



Under an order dated July 13, authorizing this committee'ito 
make contracts with Messrs. Horatio Wellington & Co., B. F. Wild 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON FUEL ANt) STREET LIGHTS. 449 

& Co., and George M. Winslow & Co. for the furnishing of such 
fuel as may be required at the various schoolhouses and public 
buildings to December 31, at the following-named prices : — 



Furnace Coal. 


Egg Coal. 


Stove Coal. 


Soft Wood. 


Hard Wood. 


$5 20 


$5 20 


$5 20 


$5 75 


$T75 



the fuel was furnished ai authorized by said order, at the prices 
as stated, and placed in the various schoolhouses and public build- 
ings. 

STREET LIGHTS. 



The city is now lighted exclusively with electric lights, with the 
exception of Boston avenue, near the Medford line, where three oil 
lamps are used and cared for by the Wheeler Reflector Company, at 
a cost of five cents per night, and lighted, as last year, on moon 
schedule. The cost of lighting the oil lamps for the year was $42.90. 

The city has been lighted during the year by electricity under 
the old three-year contract, made with the Somerville Electric Light 
Company October 1, 1889, which included 140 arc lights and 275 
incandescent lights, for the sum of $20,000.00 per year. This num- 
ber was increased from time to time, and on January 1, 1892, there 
were 158 arc and 356 incandescent lights. The number of arc lights 
was increased to September 1 of the present year, and at the expi- 
ration of the contract there were 186 arcs, while the incandescent 
lights were decreased twenty-eight. 

Under the old contract the arc lights were used each and every 
night from dusk to 1 o'clock A. M., while the incandescent lights 
were used only on moon schedule. 

Under the new contract, made October 1 of the present year, 
with the Somerville Electric Light Company, for five years, the city 
is now lighted every night and all night with half arc and incandes- 
cent lights. The price paid for the arc lights under the new con- 
tract is $120 each per year, until the number shall reach 400, after 
which the price will be $115 per light per year; the price paid 
for incandescent lights to be $25 each per annum. 



450 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



The committee would recommend that the next City Council 
appoint a suitable person to look after the street lighting, as under 
the new contract the city is to receive six cents per hour for all arc 
lights out, and one cent per hour for all incandescent lights out. 
There are many lights reported out each night, but your committee 
are of the opinion that not more than fifty per cent, of the total outs 
are reported. The present superintendent of lights is also superin- 
tendent of public buildings, building permits, and plumbing, and is 
unable to give the time to the street lighting which the city should 
receive. 









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Lamps in the city January 1, 1892, as per last report 


3 


158 


356 


517 


Erected during the year 


_ 


115 


_ 


115 


Discontinued during the year 


- 




134 


134 


Lamps in the city January 1, 1893 


3 


273 


222 


498 



For locations of the above lights see report of the superintendent 
of street lights. 

For the committee. 



WARREN J. ROBINSON, Chairman. 
WILLIAM P. MITCHELL, Clerk. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF LIGHTS. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 11, 1898. 
Accepted and referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the 
annual reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk., 



In Common Council, January 11, 1893. 
•Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of the Superintendent of Lights, ) 
January 2, 1893. J 

To the Honorable the Mayor and City Council: — 

Gentlemen, — As required by ordinance, I have the honor to 
submit my report relating to street lights for the year 1892. 

There were in the city on January 1, 1892, 517 street lamps. 
During the year 115 electric arcs and ten incandescents have been 
added, and 144 incandescents discontinued, making the number in 
the city December 31, 1892, three oil lamps, 273 electric arcs, and 
222 incandescents. 

The arc and incandescent lights are to burn, by terms of the 
new contract made for five years from October 1, 1892, 3,828 hours 
in each year. A schedule of the time of lighting and putting out is 
given to the company each month by me. 

A fine of six cents per hour for arc and one cent per hour for 
incandescent lights is imposed on the company for all lights out dur- 
ing the time they should be in service. The way of obtaining the 
outs is by the police patrolmen, which seems to me to be the best 
way yet devised. It is done so in all cities which I have knowledge ofo 
The police cover the whole city, and a report from them each morn- 
ing comes as near being correct as any that can be obtained without 
great expense. 

Three of the arc lights have been changed from iron poles and 
placed upon arms, on wooden poles, leaving only four upon iron 
extensions which belong to the city. Four arcs are suspended across 
the street, twenty-nine are upon wooden poles, and 236 are upon 
arms. The change made from placing the arc lights upon poles to 
arms is a good one, and carries out the recommendations of my 
report of last year. 



454 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTS. 



The following table gives the locations of lights, their kinds, 
and how placed : — 



Electric Arc Lamps. 



Adrian St., near Knapp School . 

Albion St., corner of Centre St 

Alpine St. 

Ames St., opposite Miner St 

Appleton St., corner of Newberne St 

Arlington St., near Hathorn St 

Ashland St., corner Sartwell Ave 

Auburn Ave., in front of estate No. 21 .... 

Austin St., corner of Benedict St 

Bartlett St., opposite Robinson St 

Beacon St., opposite Concord Ave 

Beacon St., opposite Buckingham St 

Beacon St., corner of Washington St 

Beacon St., corner of Kent St 

Beacon St., corner of Park St 

Beacon St., corner of Sacramento St 

Beacon St., between Sacramento and Harris Sts. . 

Beacon St., opposite Ivaloo St 

Beach St., at bend 

Benton Ave., opposite Gibbens St 

Berkeley St., corner of Hersey St 

Bond St., at elbow 

Bonair St., corner of Arthur St. 

Brastow Ave 

Boston St., corner Prospect Hill Ave 

Broadway, corner Union St 

iBroadway, corner Benedict Ave 

Broadway, opposite Franklin St 

Broadway, opposite Glen St 

Broadway, opposite Cross St 

Broadway Parkway 

Broadway Parkway . 

Broadway Parkway 

Broadway Parkway 

Broadway, corner Endicott Ave 

Broadway, front of estate No. 285 

Broadway, corner Marshall St 

Broadway, opposite School St 

Broadway, corner Dartmouth St 

Broadway, corner Fenwick Ave 



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- 




_ 


— 


- 




- 


— 


- 




— 


— 


- 




— 


— 


- 




- 




1 




- 




- 




- 


— 


- 




— 


— 


- 




- 


- 


- 




- 


— 


- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




1 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




1 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




1 


- 


- 




1 


- 


- 




1 


- 


- 




1 


- 


- 




- 


1 


- 




- 


1 


- 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


i - 


- 


1 


- 


- 


" 


1 




1 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF LIGHTS. 



455 



ELECTRIC STREET I^IGHTS.— Continued. 



Electric Arc Lamps. 



Broadway, corner Main St 

Broadway, corner Adams St 

Broadway, opposite Partridge Ave 

Broadway, corner Medford St 

Broadway, corner Cedar St 

Broadway, corner Willow Ave 

Broadway, corner Elm St 

Broadway, corner Wallace St . 

Broadway, corner Holland St 

Broadway, corner North St ' . . , 

Boston St., corner Greenville St 

Bow St., corner Bow-street PI , 

Bow St., corner Walnut St , 

Bow St., corner Wesley St 

Cedar St., opposite Clyde St 

Central St., opposite Vernon St 

Central St., opposite Forster St. . . . . . . 

Central St., between estates No. 192 and No. 194 

Central St., at Berkeley St 

Church St 

Columbus Ave., corner Warren Ave . . . . 

Columbus Ave., corner Bonner Ave 

Concord Sq., opposite Knapp St 

Concord Ave., at Leon St 

Concord Ave., at Springfield St 

Chandler St., near William St 

Chandler St., near Chapel St 

Crescent St., corner Pearl St 

Crocker St., at Hospital 

Cross St., comer Pearl St 

Cross St., corner Ellsworth St 

Cross St., corner Oliver St 

Cross St. at Lowell Railroad bridge .... 

Cross St., opposite estate No. 62 

Curtis St., corner Professors' Row 

Curtis St., opposite Fairmount Ave. .... 

Curtis St., opposite Remick PI 

Dane St., opposite Dane Ct 

Dana St., corner Otis St 

Day St., opposite Herbert St 

Day St., corner Orchard St 

Davis Sq 

Delaware St., at elbow 

Elm St., corner William St 

Elm St., opposite Morrison St 

Elm St., corner Chester St 

Elm St., corner Russell St 

Elm St., corner Beach St 



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- 




- 


_ 


- 




— 


— 


- 




- 


— 


- 




— 


— 


- 




— 


_ 


1 




- 


— 


- 




- 


— 


1 




— 


_ 


1 




- 


— 


- 




- 


_ 


- 




— 




- 




- 




■ - 




- 




1 




- 




- 




— 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




— 




- 




- 




- 




- 




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1 


- 




- 




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1 




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- 




— 




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- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




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1 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




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- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




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- 




- 




- 




_ 


_ 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




— 




1 


— 


— 





456 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTS. 



Contimied. 



Electric Arc Lamps. 



Elm St., at White St. . . , 

Elm St., corner Mossland St 

Elm St., opposite Porter St 

Elm St., opposite Davenport St 

Elm St., opposite Winter St 

Elm St., opposite Kenwood St 

Evergreen Ave., at Marshall St 

Evergreen Ave., at School St 

Evergreen Ave., at Dartmouth St 

Evergreen Ave., at Thurston St 

Everett Ave., opposite estate No. 23 

Flint St., opposite Rush St 

Flint St., opposite Flint PI 

Florence St., between estates Nos. 33 and 35 . . . 

Franklin St., opposite Perkins St 

Franklin St., opposite Flint St 

Fremont St., between estates Nos. 11 and 17 . . . 

Fountain Ave., opposite estate No. 12 

Frost Ave., at bend 

Oilman St., corner Aldrich St 

Oilman St., opposite Jasper St 

Olen St., opposite Brooks St 

Orand View Ave . . 

Gorham St., near Howard St 

Oreene St., at bend 

Harvard St., corner Chestnut Ct 

High St., opposite Prospect Hill Ave 

Highland Ave., corner Medford St 

Highland Ave., corner Walnut St 

Highland Ave., opposite Prescott St 

Highland Ave., corner School St 

Highland Ave., opposite Trull Lane 

Highland Ave., at Central St 

Highland Ave., corner Belmont St 

Highland Ave., corner Porter St 

Highland Ave., corner Cedar St 

Highland Ave., corner Willow Ave 

Highland Ave., corner West St 

Highland Ave., corner Grove St 

Highland Ave., corner Cherry St 

Holland St., opposite Wallace St 

Holland St., opposite Gorham St 

Holland St., corner Cameron Ave 

Hudson St., near corner Benton Ave 

Irving St., near Holland St 

Jaques St., corner Temple St 

Jenny Lind Ave., between Medford and Vernon Sts. 

Joy St., corner Leonard PI 

Kingston St., opposite Campbell Park 



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- 




_ 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 


1 


- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




1 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




_ 1 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




~ 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF LIGHTS. 



457 



ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTS.— Con^mued. 



Electric Arc Lamps. 



Laurel St., near Greene St . "V 

Linden Ave., near Elm St 

Linden Ave., corner Linden PI 

Lincoln St., at Lincoln Ave 

Line St., corner Cooney St 

Linwood St., corner Poplar St 

Lin wood St., between Poplar and Washington Sts. . 
Lowell St., between Summer St. and Somerville Ave. 

Lowell St., corner Fiske Ave 

Lowell St., opposite Wilton St 

Madison St 

Marion St., corner Cook St 

Maple St 

Marshall St., opposite Howe St 

Main St., corner Moreland St 

Meacham St., opposite Kingston St 

Medford St., corner Ward St 

Medford St., corner South St 

Medford St., corner Somerville Ave. 

Medford St., in front estate of John Manning . . . 

Medford St., at Central Sq 

Medford St., corner Walnut St 

Medford St., at Oilman Sq 

Medford St., corner School St 

Medford St., corner Essex St 

Medford St., corner Thurston St 

Medford St., corner Sycamore St 

Medford St., corner Central St 

Medford St., corner Jenny Lind Ave. ...... 

Medford St., corner Norwood Ave 

Moore St., corner Mead St 

Morrison St., opposite Clifton St 

Morrison St., opposite Grove St 

Mt. Pleasant St., between Perkins St. and Broadway 
Mt. Vernon St., at Lincoln Ave. ........ 

Myrtle St., at top of hill 

Myrtle St., near Washington St 

Mystic St. ( Ward 1 ) 

Mystic Ave., corner North Union St 

Newton St., corner Joseph St 

Newbury St 

Oak St., at bend 

Oakland Ave., corner School St. 

Oliver St., corner Glen St. ... 

Orchard St., corner Russell St. 

Orchard St., corner Dover St 

Orchard St., corner Chester St 

Park Ave., opposite Chandler St 

Partridge Ave., between Medford and Vernon Sts. . 



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458 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ELECTRIC STREET I^IGHTS.— Coitimued. 



Electric Arc Lamps. 



Parker St., corner Fremont Ave. 

Pearl St., corner Bradley St 

Pearl St., corner Mt. Vernon St 

Pearl St., corner Florence St 

Pearl St., corner Franklin St 

Pearl St., corner Glen St 

Pearl St., corner Aldrich St 

Pearl St., corner Walnut St 

Perkins St., corner Mt. Pleasant St 

Perkins St., opposite Pinckney St 

Pinckney St., between Pearl and Washington Sts. . 

Prescott St 

Preston St., near School St.. 

Professors' Row, at Packard Ave 

Professors' Row, at College Ave 

Prospect St., opposite Oak St 

Prospect St., corner Prospect PI - 

Putnam St., between Highland Ave. and Summer St. 

Richardson St., opposite Henderson St 

Richdale Ave., opposite Lee St 

Rush St., between Broadway and Brook St. . . , 

Sargent Ave., corner Sherman PI 

School St., opposite Berkeley St 

School St., opposite Montrose St 

Springfield St., opposite Houghton St. . . - , . . 

Somerville Ave., at Craigie St 

Somerville Ave., at Central St 

Somerville Ave., near Bow St 

Somerville Ave., corner Washington St 

Somerville Ave., at Fitchburg Railroad bridge . , 

Somerville Ave., at Spring St 

Somerville Ave., opposite Laurel St 

Somerville Ave., opposite Dane St 

Somerville Ave., corner School St 

Somerville Ave., opposite Hawkins Ct 

Somerville Ave., corner Prospect St 

Somerville Ave., near Mystic St 

Somerville Ave., opposite Poplar St 

Somerville Ave., at Fitchburg Railroad crossing . 

Somerville Ave., corner Franklin Ct 

Somerville Ave., corner Sacramento St 

Summer St., corner Belmont St 

Summer St., corner Cedar St 

Summer St., corner Willow Ave 

Summer St., corner Porter St 

Summer St., corner Benton Ave 

Summer St., corner Central St 

Summer St., corner Preston St 



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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF LIGHTS. 



459 



ELECTRIC STREET ILIGHTS. — Conc/uc/ed. 



Electric Arc Lamps. 



Summer St., corner School St 

Summer St., corner Prescott St 

Summer St., corner Putnam St 

Summer St., corner Cherry St 

Summer St., opposite Windom St 

Summit St., corner Billingham St 

Sycamore St., in front of estate No. 141 .... 

Tremont St . 

Tufts St., corner Glen St 

Union Sq . 

Union Sq 

Vernon St., corner Trull St 

Vinal Ave., opposite Aldersey St 

Vinal Ave., opposite Pleasant Ave 

Walnut St., opposite Mills St 

Walnut St., corner Summit Ave 

Walnut St., corner Columbus Ave 

Washington St., corner Mt. Vernon St 

Washington St., corner Washington Ave. . . . 
Washington St., corner Florence St. . . . . . 

Washington St., opposite Franklin St 

Washington St., opposite Tufts St 

Washington St., opposite Joy St 

Washington St., at Medford St 

Washington St., corner Mystic St 

Washington St., at Fitchburg Railroad bridge . . 

Washington St., corner Calvin St 

Washington St., corner Bonner Ave 

Washington St., corner Bowdoin St 

Webster St., opposite Cutter St 

Webster St., opposite Rush St 

Webster Ave., opposite Prospect St 

Webster Ave., opposite Norfolk St 

Webster Ave., opposite Everett St 

Webster Ave., junct. Newton St. at Fitchburg R. R. 
Wellington Ave., opposite Montgomery Ave. . . 

Wheatland St., corner Jaques St 

Willow Ave., opposite Morrison St 

Wyatt St 







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- 


- 




— 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


— 




— 


1 


— 


— 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


— 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


1 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


- 




- 


— 




— 



460 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



LOCATION OF INCANDESCENT LIGHTS. 



Location. 



Adams St., opposite No. 18. 
Adams St., opposite No. 06. 
Allen St., at end. 
Allen St., near Somerville Ave. 
Autumn St., corner Louisburg PI. 
Avon St., first from School St. 
Avon St., opposite No. 24. 
Beach St., near Spring St. 
Belmont St., opposite No. 14. 
Belmont St., corner Snow PI. 
Belmont St., opposite No. 41. 
Belmont St., between Highland Ave. 

and Summer St. 
Benedict St., between Nos. 3 and 5. 
Berkeley St., near Hersey St. 
Bleachery Court. 
Bolton St., corner Oak St. 
Bond St., near Broadway. 
Bond St., near Broadway. 
Bonair St., corner Cross St. 
Bonair St., corner Wigglesworth St. 
Bonair St., corner Melvin St. 
Bonair St., in front of No. 85. 
Bow-street PI. 
Boston St., corner High St. 
Bradford Ave. 
Broadway PI. 

Broadway, near Arlington line. 
Broadway, between Liberty and Willow 

Aves. 
Broadway, near City Ledge. 
Bowdoin St., at Fremont Ave. 
Cedar St., at Lowell Railroad bridge. 
Cedar St., opposite Sartwell Ave. 
Cedar St., opposite No. 14. 
Cedar St., at railroad crossing. 
Central St., opposite No. 26. 
Central St., opposite No. 32. 
Central St., at Lowell Railroad bridge. 
Central St., corner Albion St. 
Central St., opposite Hudson St. 
Chester PI. 

Chester Ave., opposite No. 19. 
Cherry St., between Sartwell Ave. and 

Elm St. 
Church St., near Somerville Ave. 
Claremon Ave. 

Claremon Ave., near Mead St. 
Clarendon Ave., opposite Western Ave. 
Clark St. 



Location. 



College .Ave. 

College Ave. 

Concord Ave., between Concord Sq. 
and Prospect St. 

Craigie St., opposite No. 74. 

Crescent Ave., opposite No. 10. 

Curtis St., between Wall St. and Ray- 
mond Ave. 

Dane St., opposite No. 23. 

Dane St., corner Frost Ave. 

Dane St., at Fitchburg railroad. 

Dane Ct. 

Dell St. 

Dickinson St., opposite Hammond St. 

Dover St. 

Elm St., corner Chapel St. 

Elm PI., near end. 

Emerson St. 

Everett St., opposite Emerson St. 

Fairmount Ave. 

Flint St. 

Fitchburg St. 

Florence Street, between Perkins and 
Pearl Sts. 

Forster St., corner Tennyson St. 

Forest St.. corner Beacon St. 

Franklin Ave. 

Franklin St., corner Oliver St. 

Franklin St., between Washington St. 
and Hadley Ct. 

Garden Ct. 

Garden Ct. 

(reorge St. 

Giles PL 

Oilman St., corner Walnut St. 

Oilman St., bet. Aldrich and Cross Sts. 

Glen St., between Pearl and Flint Sts. 

Granite St., opposite Knapp St. 

Harris St., near Beacon St. 

Hanson St., corner Durham St. 

Hanson St., corner Skehan St. 

Hamlet St. 

Hamlet St. 

Hall St. 

Heath St., opposite West St. 

Heath St., opposite No. 44. 

Hinckley St., opposite Fiske Ave. 

Hillside Ave. 

High St., between Boston St. and 
Prospect Hill Ave. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF LIGHTS. 



461 



LOCATION OF INCANDESCENT LIGHTS. — Continued. 



Location. 


Location. 


Holt PL, corner Oak St. 


Montrose St., corner Jerome St. 


Homer Sq. 


Montrose St., corner Sycamore St. 


Howe St., corner School St. 


Morgan St. 


Houghton St., opposite Bolton St. • 


Myrtle St., between Perkins and Pearl 


Irving St. 


Sts. 


Irving St. 


Mystic Ave., corner Austin St. 


Irving. St. 


Mystic Ave., near railroad bridge. 


Ivaloo St. 


Munroe St., between Walnut and Bige- 


James St. 


low Sts. 


Jaques St., bet. Grant and Temple Sts. 


Murdock St. 


Joy St., opposite No. 68. 


Murdock St. 


Joseph St., corner Adrian St. 


Oakland Ave., opposite No. 10. 


Kent Ct. 


Otis St., opposite No. 25. 


Kent Ct. 


Oxford St., between Trull Lane and. 


Kent St., at railroad. 


School St. 


Kingman Ct. 


Oxford St., corner Hersey St. 


Lake St., corner Church St. 


Park St., opposite No. 28. 


Lake St., opposite Carleton St. 


Park St., near Somerville Ave. 


Lake St., between Hawkins and Carle- 


Park St., corner Ivaloo St. 


ton Sts. 


Pearl St., corner Rush St. 


Lake St., corner Olive Sq. 


Pearl St., between Franklin St. and! 


Laurel St., opposite No. 27. 


Hillside Ave. 


Leon St., at Dickinson St. 


Pearl-street PL 


Line St., near Washington St. 


Perkins-street PL 


Line St., between Cooney St. and Smith 


Perkins St., corner Mt. Vernon St. 


Ave. 


Perkins St., opposite Florence St. 


Line St., between Cambridge line and 


Perkins St., opposite Myrtle St. 


Smith Ave. 


Pembroke St., near Sycamore St. 


Line St.. corner Smith Ave. 


Pitman St. 


Linden St. 


Pleasant Ave. 


Linden St. 


Poplar St., opposite Chestnut St. 


London St. 


Porter St., corner Williams Ct. 


Lowell St., corner Vernon St. 


Prospect St., between Oak St. and Cam- 


Lowell St., corner Richardson St. 


bridge line. 


Loring St., corner Somerville Ave. 


Putnam St., opposite No. 65. 


Loring St., at end. 


Quincy St., opposite No. 4. 


Maple Ave. 


Quincy St., opposite No. 23. 


May PI. 


Richdale Ave. 


Marshall St., corner Sherman Ct. 


School St., between Preston and Os- 


Mason Ave. 


good Sts. 


Medford St., corner Adams St. 


Skehan St., corner Dane St. 


Medford St., corner Greenville St. 


Somerville Ave., in front estate No. 63. 


Medford St., at J. P. Squire factory. 


Somerville Ave., at Fitchburg Railroad 


Medford St., near Highland Ave. 


crossing. 


Medford St., at Fitchburg railroad. 


Somerville Ave., at Belmont St. 


Medford St., opp. N. E. Dressed Meat. 


Somerville Ave., at Beach St. 


Meacham St., opposite Orchard St. 


South St., corner Hunting St. 


McGregor PL 


Spring St., near Beach St. 


Miller St. 


Spring St., bet. Summer and Beach Sts. 


Mills St., opposite No. 23. 


Summer St., corner Spring St. 


Montrose St., opposite No. 21. 


Summer St., corner Craigie St. 



462 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



LOCATION OF INCANDESCENT, LIGHTS. — C^^r/?/^^^. 



Location. 


Location. 


Summer St., between Harvard and 


Virginia St. 


Central Sts. 


Washington St., corner Wyatt St. 


Stickney Ave., opposite No. 8. 


Washington St., between Prospect St. 


Stickney Ave., opposite No. 24. 


and Somerville Ave. 


Sunnyside Ave. 


Washington St., between Kingman Ct. 


Summit Ave. 


and Hawkins Ct. 


Sycamore St., opposite Forster st. 


Wallace St. 


Temple St., opposite No. 19. 


Walnut St., corner Veazie St. 


Tenney Ct. 


Walnut St., corner Wellington Ave. 


Thorpe PI. 


Warwick St. 


Thorpe PI. 


Warwick St. 


Thorndike St., opposite Howard St. 


Warren Ave., corner Sanborn Ave. 


Tufts St., corner Dell PI. 


Wesley St., near Pearl St. 


Vernon St., corner Jenny Lind Ave. 


Wesley Park, opposite No. 11. 


Vernon St., opposite Miner St 


Wesley Park. 


Vernon St, opposite Bartlett St. 


Webster St., near Franklin St. 


Vine St., opposite Tyler St. 


Willow Bridge. 


Vine St., opposite Hanson St. 


Willow Bridge. 


Vine St., bet. Beacon and Eliot Sts. 


Wigglesworth St., opposite Otis St. 


Vine St., opposite Eliot St. 


Wyatt St., corner Cook St. 


Vinal Ave., corner Summer St. 





Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS R. ROULSTONE, 

Superintendent of Lights. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC PROPERTY. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 11, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 11, 1893. 
Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Committee on Public Property, ) 
January 2, 1892. | 

To the City Council of Somerville : — 

The committee on public property presents the following report 
for the year 1892: — 

POLICE STATION INCIDENTALS ACCOUNT. 



Credit. 






Appropriation 


$3,500 00 




Receipts for rent of hall and court room, 


430 00 




Total credit 


• 


$3,930 00 


Debit, 






Expenditures : — 






For janitor's salary 


f 850 00 




gas . . . . 


697 60 




fuel . . . . 


117 06 




water ..... 


90 70 




repairs and improvements on 






building and furniture 


1,933 49 




incidentals .... 


86 83 




Total debit . 


. 


3,775 68 


Balance unexpended 


$154 32 



466 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SCHOOLHOUSE INCIDENTALS ACCOUNT. 



Credit. 



Appropriation 


. $10,000 00 




Sale of Union School lot . 


2,340 


00 




Transfer from interest account . 


1,500 


00 




Rental of ward room . . . 


115 


00 




Receipts for articles sold . . . 


22 07 




Total credit . 


•; 


• 


$13,977 07 


Debit. 








Expenditures : — 








For repairs .... 


. $6,602 87 




improvements 


576 55 




furniture . . . . 


1,442 67 




repairing furniture and putting 








down same 


252 87 




edgestones and grading 


1,056 


89 




repairing heating apparatus 


1,472 


68 




insurance 


1,675 00 




repairing blackboards 


209 


55 




emptying privy-vaults 


132 


00 




flag-staff ... 


54 25 




heat, rent, etc. (superintend- 








ent of schools' office ) 


371 


46 




repairing halliards 


20 


25 




school supplies 


718 


37 




removing furniture 


11 


80 




land, Tufts street . 


2,142 


00 




sidewalk assessments 


741 


21 




sewer assessments 


210 


41 




books .... 


5 


00 




expressing 


22 


35 




carriage hire . 


16 


00 




Total debit . 


• tt • 


• 


17,734 18 


Amount overdrawn 


$3,757 11 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC PROPERTY. 



467 



The expenditures at the different schoolhouses were as 
follows : — 

Beach-street. 



Improvements 


. 


. 


$456 18 


Repairing heating apparatus 


. 


90 37 


I^mptying privy vaults 


. 


. 


32 00 


-Furniture . ... 


. 


, 


23 46 


Insurance 


Luther V. Bell. 


33 75 






Repairs 


. 


. , 


$656 11 


li'urniture 


. 


, 


64 19 


Repairing blackboards 


. 


. 


17 37 


-Insurance . . . 




Bennett. 


367 50 






Repairs 


, 




$172 13 


Repairing heating apparatus 




44 00 


Removing night soil . 


. 




20 00 


Furniture 


. 




33 65 


Sidewalk assessment . 


, 




107 44 


Insurance 


■ 


Bingham. 


90 00 






Repairs 


• 




$26 51 


JFurniture 


. 




13 92 


Repairing furniture 


. 




4 00 


Repairing heating apparatus 




43 47 


Repairing blackboards 


. 




2 00 


Insurance 


■ 


Brastow. 


9 00 






Repairs 


, 


, , 


$13 89 


Removing night soil 


• 




8 00 



$635 76 



1,105 17 



467 22 



98 90 



21 89 



Amount carried forward 



$2,328 94 



468 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 



$2,328 94 



Burfis. 



Repairs . . . . 
Repairing heating apparatus 
Repairing furniture 
Insurance . . . . 



$44 84 

8 30 
4 00 

9 00 



Ceda7--street. 




Repairs ...... 


$270 20 


Repairing heating apparatus 


50 71 


Furniture . . . 


12 33 


Repairing furniture .... 


5 50 


Removing night soil .... 


24 00 


Cummings. 




Repairs . . . 


$177 00 


Furniture ...... 


13 92 


Repairing furniture .... 


4 00 


Davis. 




Repairs 


$173 43 


Repairing heating apparatus 


18 28 


Repairing furniture .... 


4 75 


Edgerly. 




Repairs ...... 


$45 46 


Repairing heating apparatus 


17 62 


Furniture ...... 


37 40 


Repairing furniture .... 


27 75 


Insurance ...... 


387 50 



66 14 



362 74 



194 92 



196 46 



515 7a 



Amount carried forward 



$3,664 9a 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC PROPERTY. 



469 



Amount brought forward . 

Forster. 



$3,664 9a 



Repairs ...... 


$279 24 


Repairing heating apparatus 


5 30 


Furniture . . . 


234 11 


Repairing furniture . . 


39 75 


Sidewalk assessment . 


126 15 


Insurance ...... 


46 50 


Franklin. 




Repairs ...... 


$351 90 


Repairing heating apparatus 


86 69 


Furniture ...... 


25 57 


Repairing furniture .... 


4 00 


Removing night soil .... 


12 00 


Jacob T. Glines. 




Repairs 


$90 64 


Furniture ...... 


37 83 


Repairing furniture 


7 00 


Sidewalk assessment .... 


79 86 


Harvard. 




Repairs . . . . . 


$58 81 


Repairing heating apparatus 


14 54 


Repairing furniture .... 


1 00 


High. 




Repairs ...... 


$509 50 


Repairing heating apparatus 


285 16 


Furniture ...... 


176 62 


Repairing furniture .... 


17 00 


Repairing blackboards 


32 35 


Insurance . . . . . 


262 50 



'31 05 



480 16 



215 33 



74 35 



1,283 13 



Amount carried Jorward 



$6,448 95 



470 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 



$6,448 95 



Highland. 




Repairs ; 


$344 57 


Repairing heating apparatus 


98 55 


Furniture . . . . . 


27 00 


^Repairing furniture 


19 00 


Repairing blackboards 


37 06 


Sidewalk assessments .... 


228 16 


Jackson. 




Repairs 


$232 57 


Repairing heating apparatus 


26 80 


Repairing furniture .... 


10 50 


Removing night soil .... 


20 00 


Sidewalk assessment . . . . 


45 34 


0. S. Knapp. 


H' 


Repairs ...... 


$181 59 


R.epairing heating apparatus 


31 20 


Furniture . . . . . . 


71 66 


Repairing blackboards 


25 93 



754 34 



335 21 



310 38 



Lincoln. 



Repairs ..... 


$540 67 




Repairing heating apparatus 


44 33 




Furniture 


42 41 




Insurance ..... 


50 00 




Sidewalk assessment . 


154 26 


831 67 






KjtJ X. \J 1 



Amount carried forward . 



$8,680 55 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC PROPERTY. 



471 



Amount brought forward . 

Morse. 

Repairs .... 
Repairing heating apparatus 
Furniture 

Repairing furniture 
Repairing blackboards 
Sewer assessment 
Insurance 



$8,680 55 



Charles G. Pope, 



Prescott. 



Repairs 
Furniture 

Repairing furniture 
Edgestones, grading, etc. 



Repairs . . . . 
Furniture . . . . 
Repairing furniture 
Repairing heating apparatus 
Repairing blackboards 
Insurance . . . . 



Prospect Hill. 

Repairs i . . . 
Repairing heating apparatus 
Furniture .... 
Repairing furniture 
Insurance .... 



Spring Hill. 



Improvements 
Sewer assessment 
Insurance 



$325 99 

36 28 

155 38 

16 00 

48 59 

129 68 

187 50 



$348 55 
83 20 
17 00 

1,056 89 



$1,009 27 

110 39 

53 62 

37 75 

18 30 

123 75 



$222 34 

112 28 

252 91 

7 00 

56 25 



$120 37 
80 73 
18 00 



899 42 



1,505 64 



1,353 08 



650 7& 



219 10- 



Amount carried forward . 



$13,308 51 



472 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 



$13,308 57 



Union. 



Removing furniture 



11 80 



Webster. 



Repairs ...... 

Repairing heating apparatus ( including 

two furnaces) 
Furniture 

Repairing furniture 
Repairing blackboards 
Flagstaff 

Removing night soil 
Insurance 



$527 66 



421 


05 


26 72 


11 


00 


27 


95 


54 25 


16 


00 


33 75 



1,118 38 



Superintendent of Schools' Office. 



Rent . 
Heat . 
Carpet 
Cleaning carpet 



Total 

School supplies (brooms, dusters, lan- 
terns, etc.) ..... 

Carriage hire ..... 

Repairing halliards .... 

Ledger ...... 

Expressing ...... 

Land, Tufts street, adjoining Davis 
School 

Total ..... 

Total expenditure 



$231 00 




25 00 




111 37 




4 09 






371 46 




tj % X. ^\J 


• 


$14,810 21 


$718 37 




16 00 




20 25 




5 00 




22 35 




2,142 00 




• 


2,923 97 


• 


$17,734 18 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC PROPERTY. 473: 

SCHOOLHOUSE IN WARD TWO ACCOUNT. 

(Washington street.) 

Credit. 

Unexpended balance from 1891 . . f 856 26 

Transfer from Highland schoolhouse 

addition account .... 294 62 



Total credit . . . .... $1,150 88 

Debit. 
Expenditure : — 

For balance due architects' services (Loring & 

Phipps) 260 88. 

Balance unexpended . . . . $890 00 

SCHOOLHOUSE, EDGERLY ADDITION ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 
Appropriation 120,000 OG 

Debit. 
Expenditures : — 

George M. Starbird, on account of 

contract .... 

Smith Heating and Ventilating Co., 

on account of contract . 
Samuel D. Kelley (architect), on 

account of contract 
T. Harrington and H. F. White, 

removing furniture 

Total expenditure 
Balance unexpended . 



;io,50o 00 




298 50 




400 00 




19 00- 




. 


11,217 50 


. 


$8,782 50 



474 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



EXPENDITURES BY THIS COMMITTEE FROM MISCEL- 
LANEOUS ACCOUNT. 



City Hall expenses: — 

gas . . 

electric lighting 

fuel 

water 

telephone connections 

repairs and furniture 

insurance 

ice ... 

incidentals 



Preparing rooms for elections and caucuses 

Rent of rooms for elections and caucuses . 

Care of rooms for elections and caucuses . 

Rental of seven sets of telephone instruments in 

public buildings from Sept. 1, 1892, to Sept. 1, 

1893 

Building band stand .... 
Carpet, Company M, M. V. M. . 
Ballot boxes ..... 
Advertising sale Lincoln School lot 
Incidentals 



$61 60 




315 18 




234 25 




16 40 




113 05 




945 58 




187 50 




35 00 




97 85 






$2,006 41 




• • 


227 92 


, , 


40 00 


. 


76 00 


iments in 




D Sept. 1, 






105 00 




100 00 




141 08 




55 88 




96 00 




115 03 



City Messenger's team: — 

maintenance, including one new horse, $225.00, 
less one horse sold . . . . . 



925 95 



City Engineer's team: — 

maintenance from Apriljl, 1892, to December 
31, 1892 . ." 



202 50 



Total 



$4,091 77 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC PROPERTY. 475' 



POLICE STATION INCIDENTALS ACCOUNT. 

At the police station a new shed has been built on the westerly 
side of the police stable. 

The officers' quarters, the court room, the overseers of the poor 
room, the armory, and the lower hall have been re-frescoed, at an ex- 
pense of $1,131.76. 

SCHOOLHOUSE INCIDENTALS ACCOUNT. 

By an order dated September 29, new sanitaries have been placed 
in the Beach-street schoolhouse, and the building is now in fair con- 
dition. 

At the Bell School the walls on the northwesterly side of the 
building have been strengthened by iron rods being placed through 
the outside brick walls ; the fence has also been rebuilt and painted. 

At the Bennett School the building has been painted outside 
during the year ; also gravel sidewalks with edgestones have been 
constructed around the building. 

The Brastow schoolhouse has been discontinued during the past 
year. 

At the Cedar-street School new sanitaries have been placed out- 
side of the building, new steps have been built to the entrances of 
the building, the ceiling and walls have been whitewashed and tinted, 
and the inside woodwork has been painted. 

At the Cummings School the building has been painted outside 
and slight repairs made. 

At the Davis School the basement floor has been concreted. 

At the Forster School a brick sidewalk has been constructed on 
Evergreen avenue ; two rooms have been painted during the year, the 
ceilings whitened, and the hall ceiling tinted ; one room has been fur- 
nished with new desks for the lowest grade of pupils. 

At the Glines School edgestones and gravel sidewalks have been 
constructed. 

At the Franklin School the interior of the building has been 
painted and the ceilings whitened. 

At the Harvard School the ceilings and walls have been tinted. 



476 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

At the High School four recitation rooms and toilet rooms have 
been painted and the ceilings whitened; the boilers have received 
new tubes, and a shaking-grate placed under one of the boilers. 

At the Highland School the walls and ceilings of the halls were 
painted and whitened throughout ; brick sidewalks and edgestones 
have been constructed on Highland avenue and Grove street. 

At the Jackson School the inside woodwork has been painted, 
the ceilings whitened, and the southeast side of the roof has been re- 
shingled. 

At the Lincoln School the building has been painted outside, a 
brick sidewalk with edgestones has been constructed, and an inside 
granite curbing has been laid ; concrete walks have also been laid on 
each side of the building. 

At the Morse School the walls of six rooms have been painted, 
the teachers' toilet rooms have been fitted up, and the office of the 
principal's room has been furnished with a roll-top desk, chairs, and 
rugs. 

At the Prescott School a portion of the basement floor has been 
concreted, the walls and ceiling of one of the schoolrooms and the 
halls have been painted and the ceiling whitened ; a new entrance has 
been made from the hallway to the principal's office. 

At the Prospect Hill School a new front fence has been built, 
and two rooms have been fitted up with new furniture. 

At the Charles G. Pope School the grounds have been graded 
and curbing set on two sides of the building; a new division fence 
has been placed on the westerly side of the lot. 

At the Webster School new furnaces have been placed in the 
building, the woodwork has been painted, the walls painted, and the 
ceilings whitened. 

EDGERLY SCHOOLHOUSE ADDITION. 

By authority of an order dated June 22d, a contract was made 
with George M. Starbird for an addition of four rooms to the Edgerly 
schoolhouse, situated on Cross street, in accordance with plans and 
specifications prepared by Samuel D. Kelley, architect, for the sum of 
$16,351. The building has been raised and is now nearly completed. 
The heating appliances are to be furnished by the Smith Ventilating 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC PROPERTY. 477 

and Heating Company. The building when finished will contain 
sixteen schoolrooms, and will rank among the best in the city. 

LAND, TUFTS STREET. 

By authority of an order dated June 8th, 8,568 feet of land was 
purchased of the heirs of Charles Robinson, at twenty-five cents per 
foot, amounting to $2,142. This lot joins the Davis School lot, 
and was secured with a view to the enlarging of the schoolhouse at 
some future time. 

For the committee, 

WILLIAM A. HUNNEWELL, Chairman. 
WILLIAM P. MITCHELL, Clerk. 



REPOR 



"p 



OF THE 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 11, 1893. 
Accepted and referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the 
annual reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 11, 1893. 
Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of Inspector of Buildings, 
January 1, 1893. 



} 



To the Honorable the Mayor and City Council. 



Gentlemen, — As required by the city building ordinance, I 
have the honor to submit the report of the business of this depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1892. 

The total number of buildings, etc., for which permits were 
granted, and the uses for which they are intended, will be found in 
the following table : — 



Single dwelling-houses 

Dwellings in blocks 

Additions and alterations to buildings 

Stables . 

Factories 

Carriage-houses 

Churches 

Shops 

Schoolhouses 

Public hall with stores 

Apartment-houses 

Bakery 

Stores 

Car-house 

Offices 

Office with store 

Undertakers' office and stable . . . 
For storage 





Wards. 




1 


2 


3 


4 


31 


100 


136 


143 


2 


29 


10 


10 


15 


27 


35 


19 


5 


15 


22 


11 


2 


1 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 
1 

1 


1 
1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


1 
1 


1 


1 
1 

2 


- 


1 


- 


1 


2 


*"■ 


3 


1 

1 


2 


61 


188 


211 


191 



< 
O 



419 
51 
96 
53 
3 
6 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
3 
1 
4 
1 
1 
6 

651 



482 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



The attention of the inspector of buildings has been called in 
the following cases where violations of the ordinance occurred or the 
public safety was endangered: — 



Partition wall unsafe (new building) 
Brick walls substituted for wooden 
Strength of floor timbers (new building) 
Strength of floor timbers (old building) 
Unsafe brick piers .... 
Unsafe chimneys (new building) . 
Unsafe fire-places .... 



The total number of permits to do plumbing was 483, covering 

513 buildings. The soil-pipes in 334 buildings were tested with the 

water test. Some joints were found that were not tight, and some 

sections of pipe cracked ; but, on the whole, there has been a great 

improvement in the manner of doing plumbing over that of the 

previous year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS R. ROULSTONE, 



Inspector of Buildings, 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 11, 1893. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual reports. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 11, 1893. 
CoDCurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of the Superintendent of Public Buildings, 

January 1, 1893. 



To the Honorable the Mayor and City Council: — 



Gentlemen, — In compliance with the city ordinance No. 50, 
Sec. 8, this report is respectfully submitted. 

The number of public buildings under my care and over which I 
have supervision of the repairs and alterations is twenty-eight. The 
following is a brief description of some of the repairs and alterations 
in same : — 

Beach-street School. -^ Repairs to plastering ; walls and ceilings 
tinted and whitened ; sanitaries constructed in basement for use of 
Beach-street and Spring Hill schools ; door cut through from boys' 
yard to basement ; back steps rebuilt ; drain built to sewer ; fence 
repaired. 

Luther V. Bell School. — Iron rods have been put into the rear 
walls to strengthen the building; front fence removed; rear and side 
fences rebuilt and repaired; repairs have been made to floors, roof, 
stairs, etc. 

Bennett School. — The building was painted on the outside, two 
coats ; repairs were made to platform, steps, and janitor's rooms. 
There is great need of new plumbing in basement. 

Bingham School. — Slight repairs have been made to roof, heat- 
ing apparatus, etc. The woodwork on the outside of the building 
should be painted. 



486 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Brastow School. — The school has not been in use for school 
purposes during the year. 

Burns School. — The building has had but slight repairs; the 
brickwork to boiler was repaired and basement whitewashed. The 
outside woodwork of the building needs to be painted. 

Cedar-street School. — The inside of the building was renovated 
by paint and whitewash ; chimneys repaired ; sanitaries improved 
and rebuilt; shed new silled; walks repaired; and new steps built. 

Cummings School. — The building was painted two coats on the 
outside ; slight repairs to woodwork, furnaces, and water closets ; 
basement whitewashed. 

Davis School. — Cellar floor concreted; a door cut in brick parti- 
tion to girls' sanitaries from basement. 

Edgerly School. — This building has been raised from its founda- 
tion and four rooms added. It is to be heated by the Smith system, 
with sanitaries and ventilation complete. At the present time the 
building is unfinished. 

Forster School. — The hall and two rooms have been tinted and 
painted ; furniture in two rooms dressed off and varnished ; repairs 
made to roof, etc. 

Franklin School. — The walls of the rooms painted and ceiling 
whitened ; drain relaid ; teachers' water closet put in cellar. 

Jacob T. Glines School. — Slight repairs have been made on the 
building ; one of the connecting rooms furnished with fifty No. 1 lid 
desks. 

Harvard School. — The interior of this building has been reno- 
vated by paint and whitewash ; front fence removed. This building 
should be painted outside. 

High School. — The walls and ceilings of four recitation rooms 
and toilet room were painted and whitened ; toilet room furnished 
with carpet, etc.; boilers retubed and new shaking grate put in by 
the Continental Grate Company. 

Highland School. — The halls were painted and whitened; cold 
air boxes on east and south sides changed ; door cut through from 
basement to girls' yard. 

Jackson School. — The inside woodwork, walls, and ceilings have 
been painted and whitened ; one side of roof reshingled. 

O. S. Knapp School. — Slight repairs have been made on the 
building ; door cut through from boys' basement to stairs. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 487 

Lincoln School. — The outside of the building has been painted ; 
walls and ceilings painted and whitened ; slight repairs to heating 
apparatus. 

Morse School. — The walls and ceilings of four rooms have been 
painted and whitened ; office and retiring room fitted up ; tin roof 
painted. 

Charles G. Pope School. — Sink put in basement for janitor's use; 
new division fence built. 

Prescott School. — The walls in the hall, office, and one room were 
painted ; an entrance made to master's office from the hall ; new slate 
blackboard in master's schoolroom ; basement partly concreted ; 
desks and chairs of two rooms dressed off and varnished ; stairs 
strengthened. 

Prospect Hill School. — Repairs to fences and slight general 
repairs to building ; one room has been fitted up with adjustable 
furniture and one room with kindergarten furniture ; all rooms are 
now in use. 

Spring Hill School. — The schoolroom that was unused in 1891 
has been fitted up with kindergarten furniture and is now in service ; 
repairs have been made to chimney, sink, drain, etc. 

Union School. — This school building has been sold, together with 
the lot. 

Webster School. — Walls, ceilings, and inside woodwork painted 
and whitened; stairs strengthened; two new furnaces put in, taking 
place of stoves ; closet built for supplies; flagstaff put on building. 

City Hall. — Slight repairs have been made ; a window put in 
partition; telephone closet built; lockers built in city clerk's 
office. 

Police Station. — Hard wood floors laid in front and back offices ; 
walls and ceilings painted and woodwork varnished in front and back 
offices, lower hall, guard room, court room, office of the overseers of 
the poor, and officers' rooms, Company M, 8th Regiment, M. V. M. ; 
€ight additional closets built in guard room ; alterations in basement, 
by changing two rooms into one large room ; putting in water closet, 
sink, and bunk for accommodation of tramps ; carriage shed built in 
rear of station. 

In my report I have named only some of the larger improve- 
ments and repairs that I have been called upon to make on the build- 
ings enumerated ; but in addition repairs have been made to black- 



488 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

boards, furniture, stoves, furnaces, electric bells, roofs, drains, stairs 
floors, windows, boilers, plumbing, sanitaries, walks, etc. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS R. ROULSTONE, 

Superintendent of Public Buildings ^ 



*; 3 



REPORT 



OF THE 



INSPECTOR OF MILK. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Common Council, January 11, 1893. 
Accepted and referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the 
annual reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 11, 1893. 
Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of the Inspector of Milk 
January 1, 1893. 

To His Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Council :■ 



■\ 



Gentlemen, — As inspector of milk for the city of Somerville, 
the following annual report is respectfully submitted: — 

During the past year two hundred and thirty-two (232) licenses 
to sell milk in this city have been issued to the citizens of Somerville 
and vicinity. Forty-three (43) registers to sell milk from stores have 
also been given. There are at present about two hundred and fifty 
(250) registers in force. Counting stores and milkmen together, 
there are engaged in the sale of milk nearly five hundred (500) of 
our citizens. I am glad to affirm, from personal acquaintance and 
knowledge of these people, that the milk business is conducted as 
honorably and honestly as any other business in this city. Our milk- 
men furnish as good a quality of milk as can be found in any city in 
the State. 

Nearly three hundred (300) samples have been tested, with very 
satisfactory results. During all the years of my service as inspector, 
I have had only three complaints from private families in regard to 
their receiving poor milk from milkmen ; and the people all know 
that there is a milk inspector in Somerville. 

The number of persons engaged in the sale of oleomargarine and 
butterine is very limited. These imitations do not appear to find a 
market in this community. Only eleven "(11) licenses have been 
given. 



492 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

For licenses and registers during the past year one hundred 
and forty-three dollars ($143) have been paid into the city treasury. 

Very respectfully, 

THOMAS CUNNINGHAM, 

Inspector of Milk. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



INSPECTOR OH PROVISIONS 

AND OF 

ANIMALS INTENDED FOR SLAUGHTER 

OR 

KEPT FOR THE PRODUCTION OF MILK, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, December 28, 1892. 

Accepted and referred to the next City Council, to be printed in the annual 

reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, December 28, 1892. 
Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of the Inspector of Provisions and of Ani- 1 
MALS Intended for Slaughter or Kept for the 1 
Production of Milk, ( 

December 15, 1892. J 

To If is Honor the Mayor and Members of the City Council: — 

Gentlemen, — Under your commission and the letter of in- 
structions from the " State Cattle Commission," I am able to give 
you a statement of the work accomplished by me to date. The work 
of inspection commenced the latter part of September. Since that 
time I have made a thorough inspection of the entire city of Somer- 
ville. 

I have found four hundred and forty-two (442) neat cattle, 
owned by one hundred and sixteen (116) citizens: three hundred 
and seventy-four cows producing milk, forty-one cows dry, three bulls, 
twenty young stock, four fatting stock. All of these animals were 
free from any contagious diseases. Only three were temporarily sick 
from local causes. These cattle are distributed from one end of the 
city to the other, and each one has been personally examined by me. 
This same report has been made to the Cattle Commission, and it was 
satisfactory to them. 

I have also made an examination of three slaughtering establish- 
ments in this city, two of which did not really require an examina- 
tion, as they are fully reported by the State officials. John P. Squire's 
report that they kill, on an average, 18,000 hogs per week. The 
North Packing Company report the same in number of hogs. The 
two establishments together kill about 1,800,000 hogs annually. 
Another establishment, 104 North street West Somerville, Hartz 



496 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

t 

Gunsenhiser, proprietor, kills beef cattle and calves, averaging 
twenty-live animals per week of four working days. This man kills 
almost entirely for the Jewish population of Boston. His premises 
are kept clean and in order. 

The North Packing Company have commenced killing sheep 
and lambs. They will be in full working order by January 1st, 1893. 
Assuming that a large proportion of the parties engaged in the differ- 
ent kinds of business described in Chapter 58, Section 2, Public 
Statutes, do not keep posted in regard to the laws and liabilities, I 
have, as a notice and caution, sent to each one a copy of the enclosed 
card, so that in case of prosecution they cannot plead a lack of 
knowledge : — 

SoMERViLLE, November 17, 1892. 

The following sections of Chapter 58 are published by the in- 
spector of provisions and animals intended for slaughter, for the 
information and caution to all dealers in meats, Jish, vegetables, produce, 
fruits, and provisions of all kinds : — 

CHAPTER 58, SECTION 5, PUBLIC STATUTES OF THE STATE OF MASSA- 
CHUSETTS. 

Whoever knowingly sells, or offers or exposes for sale, or has in 
liis possession with intent to sell for food, any diseased animal, or any 
tainted, diseased, corrupted, decayed, or unwholesome meat, fish, 
vegetables, produce, fruits, or provisions of any kind whatever, shall 
be punished by imprisonment in jail for not more than sixty days, or 
by fine of not more than one hundred dollars. 

Attention is also called to Section 3 of the same chapter: — 

Said inspector may inspect all veal found in said cities or towns, 
or offered or exposed for sale, or kept with intent to sell therein, and 
if said veal is, in the judgment of the inspector, that of a calf killed 
under four weeks old, he shall seize the same and cause it to be 
destroyed or disposed of as provided in the preceding section, sub- 
ject, however, to the provisions therein contained concerning appeal 
and the disposal of moneys. 

Thomas Cunningham, 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions. 

3 Oak street, Somerville, Mass. 



REPORT OP THE INSPECTOR OF PROVISIONS. 497 

These cards have been sent, or personally delivered, to seventy- 
^seven grocers, forty-four grocers and provision dealers, eighteen pro- 
vision stores, twelve fish stores, ten fruit dealers ; total number, 161. 

This list covers about all the places where there is a chance for 
transgression of the law. 

Hawkers and pedlers are not mentioned in this law, still it is 
undoubtedly a part of my duty to keep an eye on them. I under- 
stand, from the Cattle Commission, that the inspection of cows and 
cattle must be repeated every three months. There must also be a 
•constant supervision of all cattle that may be brought to the city from 

day to day. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS CUNNINGHAM, 

Inspector. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



CITY SOLICITOR. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, March 8, 1893. 
Accepted and referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the 
annual reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, March 8, 1893. 
Concurred in. 

WILLIAM P. MITCHELL, Clerk pro tern. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



March 8, 1893. 
To the Honorable the Mayor and the City Council: — 

I respectfully submit my report as city solicitor for the year 
ending December 31, 1892. 

The following are the cases now pending in the courts to which 
the city of Somerville is a party : — 

1. Parker vs. Somerville — Before County Commissioners of 
Middlesex County. Damages on account of land alleged to have 
been taken for a sewer by the city. 

2. Squire vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court in Middlesex 
County. Damages for conversion of box drain. 

3. Boston <5n Lowell Railroad Company vs. Somerville — Before 
Superior Court in Middlesex County. Petition in regard to repairs 
and reconstruction of bridges across railroad location in Somerville 
and assessment of expenses thereof. 

4. Philbrook vs. Somerville — Before United States Circuit 
Court. Action for damages for alleged violation of the Knibbs 
patent for a relief valve on steam fire-engines. This action was 
commenced May 20, 1887, and similar actions were brought against 
other cities. Somerville and the other defendant cities put their 
cases into the hands of Livermore & Fish, patent solicitors. At a 
hearing, November 14, 1888, the court decided for the defendant, 
and the appeal from that decision is now pending. 

5. Norwood vs. Somerville — Before Supreme Judicial Court on 
exceptions. Action for personal injuries alleged to have been re- 
ceived upon Cedar street, November 2, 1889. 

6. Kelly vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court in Middlesex 



502 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

County. Action for personal injuries alleged to have been received 
upon Somerville avenue, November 25, 1890. 

7. Williams vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court in Middle- 
sex County. Action for injuries alleged to have been caused to 
cattle, July 3, 1891, by the agents of the State Board of Agriculture 
for the extermination of the gypsy moth. 

8. John F. Cole, Collector, vs. Charles If. North — Before 
Superior Court in Suffolk County. Action for recovery of taxes. 

9. McCarthy vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court in Middle- 
sex County. Action for personal injuries alleged to have been re- 
ceived upon Somerville avenue, October 31, 1892. 

10. Somerville vs. Fitchburg and Albany Railroad Companies — 
Petition for appointment of commissioners for abolition of grade 
crossings on Somerville avenue. 

The following cases have been disposed of : — 

1. Brooks vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court in Middlesex 
County. Action for personal injuries alleged to have been received 
upon Summer street, January 27, 1891. Settled by payment ( after 
verdict in court), for $2,700. 

2. Boston vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court in Middlesex 
County. Appeal from assessment of taxes. Settled by payment of 
$140 to plaintiff. 

3. Somerville vs. T. P. Beal, Receiver of Maverick Bank — Tried 
in United States Circuit Court and in Court of Appeals. Judgment 
for the city for $21,170.40, which was paid to the city. 

4. Hadley vs. Somerville — Before County Commissioners of 
Middlesex County, Appeal from assessment of taxes. Appeal dis- 
missed. 

It thus appears that the total amount expended by the city dur- 
ing the year on account of actions brought against it was $2,840. 

In most of the cases which came before the committee on claims, 
the petitioners were given leave to withdraw, and as we have not 
heard from such cases since, I need not trouble you with a recital of 
them. 

All which is respectfully submitted, 

S. Z. BOWMAN, 

City Solicitor. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



CITY CLERK. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 25, 1893. 
Accepted and referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the 
annual reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 27, 1893. 
Concurred in. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk pro tern. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE, 



Office of the City Clerk, > 
January 25, 1893. (" 

To the Honorable the Mayor and the City Council: — 

Gentlemen, — The following is respectfully submitted as th& 
twenty- first annual report of the city clerk of Somerville, and is for 
the year ending December 31, 1892 : — 

CASH. 

The receipts and payments were as follows : — 

Receipts. 

Balance from year 1891, being for dog 
licenses issued in December, 1891,^ 

6 males at $2.00 $12 00 

Less city clerk's fees paid to the city 
treasurer in December, 1891, 6 at 

.20 1 20 

$10 80' 



For dog licenses issued in 1892 : — 

1,205 males ... at $2.00 $2,410 00 
127 females ... at 5.00 635 00 



3,045 00 



Amount carried forward .... $3,055 80* 



506 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward .... $3,055 80 

recording mortgages, assigments, etc., 

649 papers $398 75 

marriage certificates . 531 at $0.50 265 50 

furnishing copies of records . . 5 25 
recording and posting naturalization 

notices .... 3 at $0.50 1 50 

licenses: — 

to collect junk . . . 45 at 2.00 
(apothecaries') to sell liquor, 22 at 1.00 
for billiard and pool tables (three 
licenses) . . 11 tables at 2.00 
to auctioneers . . 16 at 2.00 

for intelligence offices . . 5 at 2.00 
to sell fireworks . . 64 at 1.00 

for amusements . . 23 at 1.00 

934 00 

Total receipts . . . . . . $3,989 80 

Payments. 

To Joseph O. Hayden, county treasurer, 
June 1 and Dec. 1, receipts for dog 
licenses from Dec. 1, 1891, to Nov. 
30, 1892, inclusive,— 

1,209 males . . . at $2.00 $2,418 00 
127 females ... at 5.00 635 00 



90 


00 


22 


00 


22 


00 


32 


00 


10 


00 


64 


00 


23 


00 



$3,053 00 
Less city clerk's fees, 1,336 at .20 . 267 20 



$2,785 80 



To John F. Cole, city treasurer, monthly, 
city clerk's fees for issuing dog 

licenses, 1,332 at .20 . . . $266 40 

All of the " receipts " above speci- 
fied, except for dog licenses . 934 00 

1,200 40 

Total payments $3,986 20 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



507 



Balance January 1, 1893: — 

receipts for dog licenses issued in 
December, — 

2 males .... at 2.00 ^400 

Less city clerk's fees paid to city 

treasurer . . . 2 at .20 40 



Of the amount in the hands of the receiver of the 
Maverick National Bank, January 1, 1892, as 
stated in my last annual report, viz. 



dividends have been received as follows : — 



January 19, 1892, 40 per cent. 
February 25, 1892, 20 " " 
April 18, 1892, 15 " " 
June 8, 1892, 5 " " 



$593 86 

296 93 

222 70 

74 23 



Balance in hands of receiver January 1, 1893 



$3 60 



f 1,484 66 



1,187 72 

$296 94 



All of these dividends have been paid, as soon as received, to 
the county treasurer. 

BIRTHS. 



Number of births in Somerville in 1892 registered 
More than previous year . . 

Males 

Females 



Born of American parents . . . . 

" foreign " 

American father and foreign mother 
foreign father and American mother 

" parents of unknown nationality 






Number of cases of twins 



. 1,158 
2 



602 
556 

445 
470 
129 
112 

2 



1,158 



1,158 
11 



508 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



MARRIAGES. 



Number of intention certificates issued 
More than previous year 
Marriages registered 
More than previous year 
Both parties American 

" " foreign 

American groom and foreign bride 
Foreign groom and American bride 



First marriage of 
Second '' 
Third 



, 


. 530 


, 


53 


. 


. 544 


, 


49 


267 




151 




65 




61 




544 


couples. 


987 




86 




15 




544 


couples. 



Oldest groom aged ......... 73 

*' bride " 63 

Youngest groom aged ........ 18 

bride " 16 

Youngest couple aged, — 

Groom . . . . . . . . . . .19 

Bride . . . . 17 



DEATHS. 



Number of deaths in Somerville in 1892 
Less than previous year . 

Males 

Females .... 



329 

389 



718 
63 



718 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



509 



Under 10 years of age . 










223 


Between 10 and 20 years of age 










27 


u 20 " 30 " " " 










58 


30 " 40 " " " 










59 


u 40 u 50 u u u 










58 


u 50 u 60 " " '* 










59 


u 60 '' 70 " " " 










89 


70 " 80 " " " 










^3 


80 " 90 " " " 










50 


90 "100 " " " 










10 


Of unknown age 










2 


Age of oldest person deceased 


Born in Somerville .... 






193 


" " other places in the United States 






319 


Of foreign birth ..... 






. 198 


Birthplace unknown .... 






8 


Number of deaths in January ..... 118 


11 a I 


' " February 










58 


U il I 


' " March . 










55 


11 (( ( 


" April . 










51 


(( U ( 


" May 










54 


u a I 


' " June 










. 56 


a u ( 


" July 










. 64 


(( a I 


' " August 










58 


<( u < 


' " September 










. 54 


^i a I 


' " October 










. 56 


a a I 


' " November 










47 


ti li I 


' " December 










. 47 



718 



98 



718 



The number of still-births recorded during the year was 



718 



50 



The causes of death may be found in the report of the Board of 
Health. 



510 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



VOTERS. 



MEN'S LISTS. 



Ward. 



Precinct. 



Dec. 

1, 
1891. 



Added 

in 
Sept., 
1892. 



Total. 



Re- 
vised 
Lists 
of 
Oct.l, 
1892. 



Added 

in 
Oct., 
1892. 


Nov. 

1, 

1892. 


Net 
Re- 
duc- 
tion 
in 
Nov., 
1892. 


Dec. 

1, 

1892. 


Voted 
Nov. 

8, 
1892. 



Voted 
Dec. 

6, 
1892. 



Wardl 
" 1 
" 1 
" 1 



Ward 2 

" 2 
" 2 
" 2 
" 2 



Wards 
" 3 
" 3 
" 3 



Ward 4 
.< 4 

" 4 
.< 4 



City 



Precinct 1 
2 
3 
4 



Precinct 1 



Precinct 1 

2 
3 
4 



Precinct 1 
2 
3 
4 



313 


3 


335 


1 


324 


1 


341 


3 


1,313 


8 


444 


2 


479 


7 


257 


3 


370 


6 


311 


3 


1,861 


21 


438 


3 


345 


2 


470 


2 


276 


4 


1,529 


11 


340 


1 


238 


1 


262 


1 


395 


6 


1,235 


9 


5,938 


49 



316 
336 
325 
344 



1,321 

446 
486 
260 
376 
314 



1,882 

441 
347 

472 
280 



1,540 

341 

239 
263 
401 

1,244 

5,987 



280 


105 


385 




385 


356 


280 


109 


389 


3 


386 


357 


289 


152 


441 


2 


439 


410 


258 


187 


445 


4 


441 


412 


1,107 


553 


1,660 


9 


1,651 


1,535 


415 


145 


561 


1 


560 


533 


456 


141 


597 




597 


566 


232 


118 


350 


. 


350 


324 


333 


205 


538 


. 


538 


512 


286 


120 


406 


4 


402 


377 


1,722 


730 


2,452 


5 


2,447 


2,312 


412 


211 


623 


_ 


623 


572 


322 


136 


458 


5 


453 


433 


431 


126 


557 


5 


552 


528 


274 


147 


421 


- 


421 


381 


1,439 


620 


2,059 


10 


2,049 


1,914 


308 


126 


434 


. 


434 


408 


221 


129 


350 


2 


348 


333 


254 


133 


387 


2 


385 


366 


368 


176 


544 


1 


543 


521 


1,151 


564 


1,715 


5 


1,710 


1,628 


5,419 


2,467 


7,886 


29 


7,857 


7,389 



259' 
260 
276 
331 



1,126 

409 
404 
241 
336 

287 

1,677 

352 
246 
363 
245 

1,206 

282 
195 

248 
328 

1,053 

5,062 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



511 



WOMEN'S LISTS. 



Ward. 



Precinct. 



Dec. 1, 
1891. 



Revised 

Lists of 

Nov. 14, 

1892. 



Added in 
Novem- 
ber, 
1892. 



Decem- 
ber 1, 
1892. 



Voted 
Decem- 
ber 6, 
1892. 



Wardl 

"1 

"1 

"1 


Precinct 1 

2 

3 

4 


Ward 2 

"2 

"2 

"2 

"2 


Precinct 1 

2 

3 

4 

5 


Ward 3 

"3 

"3 

" 3 ..... . 


Precinct 1 

2 

3 

4 


Ward 4 

"4 

"4 

"4 


Precinct 1 

2 

3 

'« 4 


City ....... 









19 

26 

14 

1 

2 
3 

46 

4 
14 
20 

6 

44 

6 

4 

5 

11 

26 

135 



17 

16 
13 

2 
3 



34 

4 

14 

15 

6 

39 

5 
4 

4 



21 



111 



5 

11 

1 

2 

2 

21 



1 

10 

7 
2 
1 
5 

15 

54 



6 

10 

9 



25 

21 

24 

1 

4 

5 

55 

5 
14 

23 

7 

49 

12 
6 
5 

13 

36 
165 



10 

3 
11 

1 

2 

17 



6 
3 
2 
6 

17 

52 



512 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



WAR RECORDS. 

I renew the recommendation made in my last annual report, that 
measures be taken to provide a record of the services rendered in 
the late war by those who went from Somerville. 

The public naturally expect to find such a record in the posses- 
sion of every city and town. 

The expense of compiling it would be small, and while it would, 
of necessity, be incomplete, yet it would be of great interest, and 
could be added to from time to time, as new material should become 
available. 

The longer this work is postponed, the more imperfect will be its 
results, as every year reduces the number of those capable of giving 
the necessary information. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, 

City Clerk. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1893. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1893. 



MAYOR. 
WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, 

188 Central Street. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

William L. Barber, President. 



WARD ONE. 



Edric Eldridge 
Charles B. Sanborn 



Frank E. Fitts 
Franklin J. Hamblin 



William L. Barber . 
John Andrews . 



WARD TWO. 



WARD THREE. 



WARD FOUR. 



Charles A. G. Winther 
Franklin F. Phillips 



88 Pearl Street. 
4 Austin Street. 



17 Pleasant Avenue. 
30 Walnut Street. 



36 Marshall Street. 
34 Albion Street, 



408 Highland Avenue. 
211 Holland Street. 



CLERK. 

George I. Vincent, 



516 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

Fred W. Gilbert, President, 



WARD ONE. 



Isaiah H. Wiley 
Herbert E. Merrill 
Lewis Stockbridge . 
Wilfred B. Rich 



54 Mt. Vernon Street. 
44 Florence Street. 
33 Pinckney Street. 
13 Franklin Street. 



WARD TWO. 



Fred W. Gilbert 
George B. Clarke 
Arthur W. Haynes 
Frank W. Kaan 



101 School Street. 
31 Berkeley Street. 

1 1 Parker Street. 

12 Pleasant Avenue. 



WARD three. 



Calvin H. Whitney 
Leonard B. Chandler 
G. Franklin Wilkins 
George H. Russ 



68 Gilman Street. 
45 Jaques Street. 
98 Central Street. 
28 Montrose Street. 



WARD four. 



Franklin E. Huntress 
J. Willard Jones , 
Frederick A. P. Fiske 
Benjamin J. Downs . 



318 Elm Street. 
217 Beacon Street. 
52 Cherry Street. 
52 Claremon Street. 



CLERK. 

Charles S. Robertson. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1893. 517 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Hamblin, Winther; Councilmen Merrill, 
Wilkins, Clarke. 

City Engineering. — Aldermen Barber, Sanborn; Councilmen 
Wilkins, Haynes, Downs. 

Claims. — His Honor the Mayor; Alderman Hamblin; the Presi- 
dent of the Common Council; Councilmen Rich, Fiske. 

Finance. — His Honor the Mayor; Aldermen Fitts, Phillips; the 
President of the Common Council; Councilmen Stockbridge, Whit- 
ney, Kaan, Fiske. 

Fire Department. — Aldermen Fitts, Phillips; Councilmen 
Wiley, Jones, Wilkins. 

Fuel and Street Lights. — Aldermen Sanborn, Winther; Coun- 
cilmen Jones, Haynes, Russ. 

Highways. — Aldermen Barber, Sanborn ; Councilmen Wiley, 
Clarke, Downs. 

Legislative Matters. — His Honor the Mayor; Alderman Bar- 
ber; the President of the Common Council; Councilmen Fiske, 
Chandler. 

Ordinances. — Aldermen Phillips, Hamblin; Councilmen Stock- 
bridge, Huntress, Russ, 

Printing. — Aldermen Hamblin, Eldridge; Councilmen Whitney, 
Huntress, Merrill. 

Public Grounds. — Aldermen Winther, Fitts ; Councilmen 
Stockbridge, Haynes, Chandler. 

Public Property. — Aldermen Eldridge, Andrews ; Councilmen 
Huntress, Kaan, Rich. 

Soldiers' Relief. — Aldermen Andrews, Eldridge; Councilmen 
Jones, Clarke, Russ. 

Water. — Aldermen Andrews, Phillips ; the President of the 
Common Council; Councilmen Rich, Downs. 



518 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Elections. — Aldermen Phillips, Fitts, Barber. 

Enrolled Ordinances. — Aldermen Winther, Eldridge, Ham- 
blin. 

Licenses. — Aldermen Sanborn, Andrews, Phillips. 

Police. — Aldermen Fitts, Sanborn. 

Sewers. — Aldermen Sanborn, Andrews, Winther. 

State Aid. — Aldermen Eldridge, Hamblin, Andrews, Winther. 

Special Building Permits. — Aldermen Barber, Fitts. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Elections AND Returns. — Councilmen Wiley, Kaan, Chandler. 
Enrolled Ordinances and Resolutions. — Councilmen Me 
rill, Whitney, Fiske. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1893. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

William H. Hodgkins, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 

Fred W. Gilbert, President of the Common Council, ex officio. 

(Term, three years.) 

WARD one. 

S. Newton Cutler (elected 1891). 
Sanford Hanscom, M. D. (elected 1890), 
George S. Poole (elected 1892). 

WARD TWO. 

Thomas M. Durell, M, D. (elected 1890). 

Alvah B. Dearborn, M. D. (elected 1891). 

Herbert A. Chapin (elected 1892). 

WARD three. 

Norman W. Bingham (elected 1891). 

QuiNCY E. Dickerman (elected 1892). 

Helen J. Sanborn (elected 1890 ). 

WARD four. 

Giles W. Bryant, M. D. (elected 1892). 

Martin W. Carr (elected 1890). 

Benjamin G. Brown (elected 1891). 

Clarence E. Meleney, Superintendent and Secretary. \ 



520 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ASSESSORS. 

( Term, three years.) 

Benjamin F. Thompson (term expires 1896). 

George W. Hadley (term expires 1894). 

Samuel T. Richards (term expires 1895). 

Clerk of Assessors, Albert B. Fales. 



ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

(Term, one year.) 

WARD ONE. 

Edward G. Wiswell. 

WARD TWO. 

David A. Sanborn. 

ward three. 
Edgar T. Mayhew. 

WARD four. 

Harry A. True. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

(Term : City Physician, three years; other members, two years.) 

Thomas M. Durell, M. D., Chairman (term expires 1895). 

Alvah B. Dearborn, M. D., City Physician ( term expires 1895). 

Alvano T. Nickerson (term expires 1894). 

C/erkf William P. Mitchell. 

Inspector, Caleb A. Page. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1893. 521 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Office, Police Building, Bow Street. 

William H. Hodgkins, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio, 
(Term, four years.) 

Charles G. Brett (term expires 1893). 

Edward B. West (term expires 1^95). 

Nathan H. Reed (term expires 1894). 

James G. Hinckley (term expires 1896). 

Agent^ Charles C. Folsom. 



SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD. 

Office, Prospect Street, corner Somerville Avenue. 

( Term, three years.) 

George D. Wemyss (term expires 1894), 
5 Austin Street. 

George A. Kimball (term expires 1895), 
5 Munroe Street. 

William Franklin Hall ( term expires 1896 ), 
345 Broadway. 

Nathaniel Dennett, Supt. Water Works. 

Frank E. Merrill, Clerk. 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS. 
( Term : City Clerk, one year ; other members, three years.) 

Cromwell G. Rowell, Chairman (term expires 1894). 

Charles P. Lincoln (term expires 1895). 

Charles E. Parks (term expires 1896). 

George I. Vincent, City Clerk. 



522 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

( Term, three years.) 

Charles S. Lincoln, Chairman (term expires 1894). 

Charles A. West, Secretary ( term expires 1895 ). 

James E. Whitaker (term expires 1896 ). 

John B. Viall (term expires 1896). 

J. Henry Flitner ( term expires 1895 ). 

Christopher E. Rymes ( term expires 1894 ). 

Elijah C. Clark (term expires 1895). 

Charles H. Brown (term expires 1894). 

Charles A. West ( term expires 1895 ). 

J. Frank Wellington (term expires 1896). 

Harriet A. Adams, Librarian. 



CITY OFFICERS. 



CITY CLERK AND CLERK OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

George I. Vincent. 



CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

John F. Cole. 



MESSENGER TO CITY COUNCIL. 

Jairus Mann. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Selwyn Z. Bowman. 



CITY AUDITOR. 

Charles S. Robertson. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Horace L. Eaton. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Thomas H. Eames. 



524 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS AND SUPERINTENDENT OF 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Thomas R. Roulstone. 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 

Melville C. Parkhurst. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
James R. Hopkins. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF ELECTRIC LINES AND LIGHTS. 

Leighton W. Manning. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Alvah B. Dearborn, M. D. 



INSPECTOR OF MILK AND VINEGAR. 

Thomas Cunningham. 



CLERK OF COMMITTEES. 

William P. Mitchell. 



CLERK OF ASSESSORS. 

Albert B. Fales. 



Suitable Person to Cause to be Properly Interred the Bodies of 

Honorably Discharged Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines, 

Under Chapter 395, Acts of 1889. 

Jesse J. Underhill. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1893. 525 



CONSTABLES. 

Jairus Mann. William D. Hayden. 

Robert R. Perry. Joseph J. Giles. 

Charles C. Folsom. Dennis Kelley. 

Edward McGarr. Charles L. Ellis. 

Christopher C. Cavanagh. Clarence Tucker. 

Eugene A. Carter. George H. Carleton. 



FIELD DRIVERS. 

Christopher C. Cavanagh. Charles S. Thrasher. 

George H. Carleton. George W. Bean. 

John E. Fuller. Charles L. Ellis. 

Jacob W. Skinner. John G. Knight. 

Theodore E. Heron. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

Lambert M. Maynard. Ammiel Colman. 



POUND KEEPER. 

( Office vacant.) 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Ammiel Colman, 34 Marshall Street. 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK. 

Samuel T. Littlefield. 



MEASURER OF GRAIN. 
John Craig. 



PUBLIC WEIGHER IN CHARGE OF CITY SCALES, UNION 

SQUARE. 

Fulton O'Brion. 



526 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



WEIGHERS OF COAL. 

John Craig. D. Warner Danforth. 

George K. Walcott. Thaddeus Harrington. 

Charles H. Tucker. C. C. Wooley. 

G. E. Slack. Edward L. Dunning. 

George E. Newcomb. William I. Newcomb. 



WEIGHERS OF BEEF. 

D. Warner Danforth. Thaddeus Harrington. 

Charles H. Tucker. George K. Walcott. 

C. C. WooLEY. G. E. Slack. 

Frederick A. Geiling. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Melville C. Parkhurst, Chief. 



Robert R. Perry, Captain. 
Chris. C. Cavanagh, Sergeant. 
Eugene A. Carter, Sergeant. 
John E. Fuller. 
Albion L. Staples, 
Judson W. Oliver. 
George W. Bean. 
George L. Smith. 
Edward M. Carter. 
John F. Johnson. 
Edward E. Hamblen. 
Charles E. Woodman. 
Arthur E. Keating. 
Stephen S. Smith. 
Eugene H. Gammon. 
Ira S. Carlton. 
Charles W. Stevens. 
James J. Pollard. 
Ulysses G. Skinner. 



Edward McGarr, Sergeant. 
Dennis Kelley, Sergeant. 
Phineas W. Skinner. 
Samuel A. Brown. 
John Hafford. 
George A. Bodge. 
Theodore E. Heron. 
George H. Carleton. 
Hubert H. Miller. 
Francis A. Perkins. 
Charles S. Thrasher. 
William H. Johnston. 
John G. Knight. 
Jacob W. Skinner. 
David A. Bolton* 
James M. Harmon. 
Michael T. Kennedy. 
Ezra A. Dodge. 
Daniel G. Simons. 



Melville C. Parkhurst, Lock-up Keeper. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1893. 527 



MEETINGS. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Second and fourth Wednesday evenings of each month. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

First and third Wednesday evenings of each month. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Last Monday evening of each month. 



528 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



INDEX. 















PAGE. 


City Government and Officers for 1892 3 


« 


(( 


" '• 1893 . . 








513 


Mayor's 


Inaugural Address . . . . , 








15 


Meeting 


;s 


>..•..... 








527 


Report 


of the 


Board of Health 








285 


(( 


(( 


Chief Engineer of Fire Department . 








431 


« 


<< 


City Clerk . . . ..... 








503 


(( 


(( 


*' Engineer . . . . . 








359 


(( 


« 


" Physician . . . 








317 


(( 


(( 


" Solicitor 








499 


(( 


(( 


" Treasurer and Collector of Taxes 








29 


« 


(( 


Committee on Fire Department 








425 


t( 


« 


" Fuel and Street Lights 








445 


<( 


« 


" " Highways 








329 


(( 


(( 


" •' Public Property . 








463 


(( 


« 


" " Sewers 








351 


«( 


(( 


Inspector of Buildings 








479 


<( 


(( 


Inspector of Milk .... 








489 


(( 


(( 


Inspector of Provisions and of Animals Intendec 
Slaughter or Kept for the Production of Milk 


i for 


493 


(i 


<( 


Overseers of the Poor 




277 


u 


(< 


School Committee .... 








161 


« 


(( 


Somerville Mystic Water Board 








227 


(( 


u 


Superintendent of Lights . 








451 


(( 


n 


Superintendent of Public Buildings 








483 


u 


K 


Trustees of the Public Library . 








321